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THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




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EXTRA 




EDITION 



ARE YOU 



AIRCRAFT 
MODELLER 










200-202, REGENT ST., LONDON, W.I. 



OUR ONLY ADDRESS 



ToUphon*: REGENT 3161 



No. 31 



April, 1938 



TRAINS THAT 

STOP 
LET EACH 
OTHER 














Two clockwork trains and automatic rails. 

Place the trains on the line facing in opposite 

directions. Set one in motion. When it draws 
level with the other it will stop automatically 

to allow its neighbour to move off. When 

the second one comes round again it will 

stop and allow the first one to move off, and 

so on. Most ingenious and very entertaining. 
Two trains and track. 



(Foreign.) 



PRICE 
Poit 9d. 










u 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






M ? 












p 



AND 



Meccano pares, many of which are illustrated below, combine to form a complete miniature 
engineering system with which practically any movement known in mechanics can be correctly 

uced. New parts are always being introduced in order to keep Meccano model-building 

in line with the most modern engineering requirements. The greatest care is taken in the design- 
ing of these parts to ensure that they function exactly as their counterparts in actual engineering 
practice. Ask your dealer for the latest complete illustrated price list. 

Binns Road, LIVERPOOL 

w 









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127 



m, * 



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139 



66&67 



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170 






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136 



158 A 



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DDUOD 



P O O O O O o 









147 & 148 






7* ^* v?a 






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106 









I54 A &I54 



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160 



30*& 30° 



Parts 



Illustrated 



»•* 



<■>+ » 



> 

Perforated Strips, 3|* 
Angle Girders, 34* 
Double Brackets.., 

Angle Brackets, k" x $*.*. „ 

Axle Rods, 2* ,„ „. 4 for 

Wheels, 3~ diam. 



i i fr 



each 



19c 



p * # 



* * * 



i # i 



« - * 



#** 






Flanged Wheels, 1 ft" diam. 

Pulley Wheels 
6* diam,, with centre boss 

and sec screw *.. 

2* diam., with centre boss 
and set screw B# . 

V diam, f with centre boss 

and set screw ,.. 
ft* diam,, with centre boss 

and grub screw 
1* diam., without centre 

boss and grub screw.,. 
Bush Wheels 
Pinion Wheels, ft* dram,. 

i'face 
Contrate Wheels, 1 ft* diam. 

f« it I J, 

Bevel Gears, I* t 26 teeth 

Gear Wheels, 1 * 38 teeth 

Worms 

nked Bent Strips 
Double 
Perforated Strips, slotted, 

5ft* long 
Windmill Sails 
Cranks 
Centre Forks 

Weights, 50 grammes 

25 



••• 



ii 



_ rt 



9- * * 



* * 



■ ■ ■ 



■ mm 



** + 



* ■ & 



*** 



**■ 



. .« 



■ ■ ■ 



Triangular Plates. 2ft* 

2ft* Curved Scrips, 2£" 
2ft* t , w cranked. 

If" radius 
Sprocket Chain, per 40* length 

Wheels. 1* diam* each 

Braced Girders, 1 2J " long \ doz. 3 
Single Bent Strips 
Flat Girders, 3ft* long 
^and Rollers 



«• » 



••• 



diam 



1 06a 

108 : / Architraves 

10?V Face Plates. 2 J 

Rack Strips. 3ft*„. 
er Frames •., 

1UV, Hinges 

116 Fork Pieces. Large 

Hub Discs, 5 J # diam. 

Buffers 



♦ V ft 



each 

ft doz. 

h 1 

doz. 

each 



• • 



*•# 



« 1 1 



«• # 4 



* *• 



mm * 



* * * 



A*fl 



t*f 






Compression Springs 
Train Couplings ... 
Cone Pulleys 
Reversed Angle Brackets, 



■ m + 



*« « 



*** 



m * 1 



** * 



»• i 



* ■ * 



Reversed Angle Brackets 
ft 

Trunnions 

Flat Trunnions ... 

e Bell Cranks 

Boss Bell Cranks 



A doz. 



each 



**« 



■ » A 



*■• 



• •■ 



139 



Rack Segments. 3* diam. 
Eccentrics, Triple throw 
Dredger Buckets 
Flywheels, 2|* diam. 

Corner Brackets, 1* 
Crank Shafts, 1 * stroke .,* 

Handrail Supports 
f138a-z Ships' Funnels, Raked 

Flanged Brackets (right) 

Universal Couplings 
Circular Girders. Sft* diam. 
Circular Strips, 7 J* dUm. 
Circular Plates* 6* diam. 

■ 3 W f 5 » ■ « ■ ■ B i ■ i. 

Ratchet Wheels *„ 
Collecting Shoes 

ne 
Pulley Blocks. Single Sheave 
Corner Angle 



■* 



* - * 



• *» 



• #4 



154a 
154b 



# P * 



111 



141 



4* (right hand) 
Corner Angle B 

ft* (left hand) ... 

Pointers. 2|" overall 

Signal Arms, Home 
Channel Bearings, 1 J 

1* x i* 

Girder Brackets. 2* x 1* 

X i* 

Boilers. Complete ... 

Geared Roller Bearings^, 

Ball Bearings. 4' diam. .„ 

Digger Buckets .. 



i doz, 



2 for 

each 



• • ■ 



■■ 



187 



Eccentrics, i* throw 
Socket Couplings «** 

Toothed Gear Rings. 31* 

diam, 133 teeth exter- 
nal. 95 teeth Inurnit... 
Road Wheeli 






■ 






Helical Gears. \* 
„ M 1 f 

Can only he used togtthtr. 
\Th* a §rist includes 26 dijjfirsnt Funntls. 







MECCANO MAGAZINE 



in 










■ 




















THE RAIDER 

wing span 13 J* 





_ I 

Complete with patent 

winder in specially con- 
structed box 
















• 



\ 



Many boys watch with interest the 



flights 
parks. 



o 




model aeroplanes 



in 



th 



e 



They 



a 




wish 




they, too 



j 



could own these wonderful machines. 



But even if these super models are too 



expensive you can get the 




of 



owners 




3 




or less than two shillings- 






Go to your 
"RAIDER. 



local 




and 




the 




u 





e amazed at 



its 




rmance. 



AIRCRAFT 



r* 






OBTAINABLE AT ALL GOOD TOYSHOPS AMD STORES 

■ ■ 

Covered by world Patents granted and pending. Made in England by 



International Model Aircraft Ltd, 



Sole Concessionaires 




COUPON 



Please 



# 





parti 

hands 
Name* 

A d d r ess 



To Lines Bros. Ltd. CDepu 51* 
Morden Road, London, S.W.ig 
$end me your "Frog " coloured leaflet with 
of ihe ** Frog " Flying Club and how to obtain 
s enamelled FROG Pilot Badges, 



»■** *a*»*«*l««*i ■#•■■«•# #*•**• 4 ••■«»■ ■»■»«** ««**-- •••»***■ #tli|«ititl*ttt*li ■ *»•• 



•*«»»* 



•*..,..* 



UMES BROS- LIMITED, TRI-ANG WORKS, MORDEN ROAD, LONDON, S.W.I 9 



Trade " M* 

Read. 



ark 



Please write in 



»**»«**«■***«###*» 






IV 






THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 














No. REFRIGERATOR VAN 

L.M.S., G.W., N.L and 

S.R» Finished with the appro 
pnafe derails Price 1/6 



ti 



•OPEN WAGON "B' 

Fitted wi?h centre tarpaulin- 

supporting fail. Price 21- 





No. 1 WAGON 

Price t/6 



•HOPPER WAGON 

Mechanically unloaded 

ice 3/- 







LM.S 




m* 



• 1 



No. 2 CORRIDOR COACH 

composite Not suitable for 1 ft. radius rail* 

Price 7/6 







No. 2 CORRIDOR COACH 

» 

I N ER, Brake-composite .Nor suitable for Hi radius rails. 

Price 7/6 










The Hornby Series includes a splendid rerrfle of realistic Rolling Stock. Each item is 
filled with patented and exclusive automatic couplings, a special Feature that places it in 
d»s entirely of its own. There ere Pullman Cars, Passenger Coaches, Guards' Vans, Tipping 
Wagons, and many other types, all beautifully finished. 
An attractive selection of Hornby Rolling Stock is illustrated and described on this page. Ask your dealer 




, Lumber 



for a com 




price h$| # 





No. 

BANANA VAN 

Lettered LM.S, only 

Price 1/6 



No. 1 BANANA 
VAN 1 FYFFES M 

Sliding doors. 
Price 2/3 





FIBRE WA60N 

This is an interesting model 

of a type of wagon used in 
France and other European 
countries Price 1 j 3 



REFRIGERATOR VAN 

No. 1 

Finished in white. Wilh sliding 
doors. Price 2/3 





No. 1 LUMBER WAGON 

Fitted with bolsters and 



SNOW PLOUGH 

With revolving plough 

Price 3(11 




ions for log transport. 
Price 1/3 








BAS CYLINDER WAGON 

Finished in red, lettered 

Price 1/8 




CEMENT WAGON 

The door ai the fop opens 
Finished in yellow. Lettered 
"Blue Circla*' Portland 

Cement. Price 1/11 




TROLLEY WAGON 

Not suitable for 1 ft. radius rails* 

TROLLEY WAGON 

Fined with two Cable Drums. 



Price 41 



Pnce 4/6 




■ 






OIL TANK WAGON 
"MOBILOIL" 

Finished in battleship grey. 




Price 1/11 









No. 1 PETROL TANK 
WAGON. "SHELL-B.P." 

Price 1/11 



No. 2 CORRIDOR COACH 

G.W. Brake-composite. Not suitable for 1 ft. radius tails. 

Price 7/6 



- 



I 









No. 2 GORRiOOR COACH 

S.R. Brake- composite. Not suitable tor 1 ft. 

Price 7/6 



No. 

An 
bi 



radius rails. 



MILK TRAFFIC VAN 

attractive model. Avail- 
lettered G.W. only, 
Price 1/6 



CHOCOLATE VAN 
"CADBURY'S" 

This van is beautifully enanv 
lied in blue with white roof. 

Price 2/3 




lettered L.M.S., N.E., Q.VP. or S.R 





No. 2 HIGH CAPACITY WAGON 

in correct colours of G.W, and L.M.S. "L 
Coal" Wagons, or LN.E.R. "Brick" Wagon. Not sui 
tot I ft. radius rails. Price 




41 




No. 1 TIMBER 
WAGON 

Beautifully enam- 
elled in yellow and 
red. Price 1 /3 



No. 1 SIDE TIPPING WAGON 

Excellent desrgr and finish. 
Letlered "Robert Hudson Ltd." 

Price 21- 





No. FISH VAN 

lettered LM.S., G.W. and 
NX Price 1/6 



No.O ROTARY TIPPING 

WAGON 

Container revolves and 

lips. Price 1 f 6 




No. 2 

LM.S. Fi*st-third. 



CORRIDOR COACH 

Not suitable for I ft. radius 
Price 7/B 



raili 




No. 2 CORRIDOR COACH 

LN.E.R. First-third. Not suitable for 1 ft. radius rail* 

Price 7/B 




G.W. 



Ni. 2 

First-third. 



CORRIDOR COACH 

Nor suitable* for 1 ft. radius 
Price 7/B 



rails 




No 2 CORRIDOR COACH 

S.R. Third class. Not suitable for I ft. radius 

Price 7/B 



rails 




■ ■ 











# 










* 
















MECCANO MAGAZINE 



i 

V 










MODEL 



AT 



AN 



AMAZING 



PRICE 




ONLY 



tO/6 



o* 



^ N 



^ 



& 




►NV 



GO 



O* 



^o 



m 



*° 



& 



N 



^ 



& 



O* 



& 






You may have seen this fine model at your toyshop and 
admired its appearance. Lose no time in discovering for 

is exce 




yourself its actual flying performance. 

for a true to type model at such a moderate price. 




READ THIS 







FICATION. 





Fitted with 




t 





and 



■ 









box, FROG 




detachable wings 



> 



twin 
spring 



18 



step-up 





« 



gear 

Dowty 




e 



t) 




rcarriage with aluminium wheel spats. 






in a really bad 



carriage 

nearly as possible "crash-proof? 

high-speed 




Machine is as 



> 




box 9 giving six 




with. FROG 
in the time 





one. 







MODEL AIRCRAFT 

Coveted by World Pat cm t 
granted and pending* 






Made in England by Inter- 
nationa I Mode I Aircraft Lid, 

Sole Concessionaires; 









LINES BROS. LTD.. MOR- 
DENRD.,MERT0N t S.W.t9 




COUPON 



To Lines Bros. Ltd. (Dept* S)> 
Morden Road, London t S,W*i9 



4/38 






Please send me your ,# Frog" coloured leaflet with panicul 
"Frog" JFIyinp Club and how to obtain handsome enamelled 



Frog** Pilot badges. 



*N m. V i V L JtC- ■ • ■ ■ « 



— - 



# - ft 



■ * * * 



• ■ 



i # * « 



« •■ * * 



P V * * « 4 



# * * # 



!RAl>, MARK 

REGD # ADDRESS 



■ 






• • • 



• * 



u' 



n 



VI 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 




I 



I 



* 



* 



_ 



r 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



■ ¥ 



Vll 






YOU'LL GET JUST THE SAMETHRILL 



: i*tt 



OUT 



SCREWDRIVER AND 



I 






SOME MILBRO PARTS! 

DUILDING your own locos, 

trucks, coach 
manent way 

pastime, especially when using 

e true-to-scale materials 
you can get all the thrill 
locomotive assem 
your own horr 

expe 

Mm * * 

can t imagine 

working a railway that you 






you 









you 



you want 



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personally 












09 



It's on 



. 






full of fascinating 



USE MILBRO T RUE-TO-SCALE 

MODELS 






m 



m 



Milbro Standard A -4 -2 Electric Tank 

Locomotives, £2-19-6 









WAYSIDE HALT 

S/O, 28 in. Ion i, 3 /f each 

GOODS DEPOT 

$15, 20 in, long, 1 016 each 

ENGINE SHED 

20 in. long, 9/6 eac, 



(singl 



e to 



irBiUie Mills—one of the"Big Three 

Milbro, has made a lifelong 

study of model railway problems. 



muE 



MILLS IRM. (Mttftl EaclHtrs) LTD.. DtiL F.S.. St. Mtrv'i Hi.. SHEFFIELD 2 











per pair, in Black, 

Colours extra. 

Write for Pocket Catalogue. 

BLUEMEL BROS. LTD.. Dent. 27. WOLSTON.Nr. COVENTRY 

















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ALL GAUGE 



i 



00 



> 



RAILWAYMEN 






our new series of line side models. In add 



ill be in- 
*re sted 

essential 



models such as stations, goods depots etc., we are making many 
new ones as standard product 

station, 




hoarding, villag 








power 

^ .__ -^ — , cement 

depot etc., etc. Every building is a hand-made copy of the real 
thing, built by expert workmen with years of experience. Write 



for our iree catalogue and price list. If it does not cover your 
requirements we are always pleased to quote for special models 
and we give special terms to members of Model Railway Out 



THE MODELS RANGE IN PRICE 





D 



TO 22'6 




UG 




M 









» 

















I 







H.M.S. NELSON 






H.M.S. NELSON. Complete Kit-Set for assembling 



Made-up model ready to sail 






25'- 

36'6 




Hugar Models Kit-Sets enable you to build for yoursell scale working models oi famous ships 
of H.ML Royal Navy and the Mercantile Marine. Kit-Set of H.M.S, NELSON (made-up 
model illustrated here) contains over 100 parts and a detailed instruction sheet for assembling 
When built the model A l**t§ perfectly, is electrically propelled and answers to the helm. Made- 
up models of ships completely equipped and ready for sailing are also available. Besides H.M.S. 
NELSON we can supply working models of the following— H.M.S. Southampton, R.M.S. 

Q 



uecn 



Maiy, R.M.M V. Sterling Castle, R.M.M.V. Alhlone Castle. S.S. Orion. S.S. Oread** 

and 5*S, Epsom Downs (Modem Cargo Vessel). The models are 2 feet upwards in length, 
and they will run 21 hours non-stop. 



Write now for description* and price list of models* sent f\ 
chart for building H.M.S. Nelson. 








instruction 




STR 




* 





9 



su 










V1U 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 












" * 



TRI-ANG TRICYCLE ^ 

f«itt TB*ri ****;i 



flL ■ - 



A 



TRI-ANG TRICYCLE No. 5B (Regd. Trade Mark) 

Cycle chain drive with free-wheel* frame best qualify woldless cycle tubing. 16 in. 
wheels 1| in. jointless sponge-rubber fyres. I m proved handlebars. FITTtD WfTH BALL- 
BEARINGS THROUGHOUT AND ROLLER BRAKE. Coil-spring saddte. CHROMIUM- 

FITTfNGS Black, blue or maroon. 

^K PRICE 59'6 








MODEL N? 2- 



1 ' I" 



TRI-ANG "FAIRYCYCLE" (Regd.) MODEL No, 2 

Tubular frame. 14 in* wheels. 1 | in. grey imitation pneumatic lyres. Ball-bearing pedals. 
Rim brake. Two-coil saddle. Chain cover. Stand CHROMIUM-PLATED FITTING! 
Black, blue of maroon.. 

' PRICE 39'6 





TRU 








TRI-ANG "UNITY" JUVENILE CYCLE No. 16PB 

Frame of best quality weldless steel tubing Adjustable ball-bearings throughout. 16 in. x If in. 






Dunlop pneumatic tyes on rustless tangent spoke wheels. Two rim brakes* Raised handlebars. 
i in, x i in, cycle roller chain, Three-roil saddle, CHROMIUM-PLATED FITTINGS Block or blue. 

PRICE 59'6 

GIRLS' MODEL SAME PRICE. 





K.3,MA«fiARET 



" 






If 



K YACHT "MARGARET 

Magnificent craft with AUTOMAT !C STEERING Patent light-weight 
wealher-re&istlng hull Solid mahogany polished deck. Mast and boom 
made from finest selected material best quality sails, fully adjustable. 
Beautifully finished in blue and white. Length of hull, 26 in. 



PRICE 




/ 



OTHER 




17/6, 35f 



COASTAL STEAMER "BRITISH 





COASTAL STEAMER "'BRITISH MERCHANT 

Exceptionally strong 

shafts, portholes 

cargo. Hull finished 



f# 



TRI-ANG SPEED BOAT No* 3 



Special!/ designed hull with mahogany deck, brass fittings, ventilators and detachable motor 
covar.VerypswGrful clockwork, Complete with bow pennant and stern flag Hull 20J in* overall. 






. Two working derricks. Dummy ventilating 
navigating lights. Anchor and chain. Two holds with dummy 

in red and btack with white superstructure- Overall length, 30 in, 

PRICE 37'6 



PRICE 




FITTED WITH ELECTRIC MOTOR 25'- 



ASK YOVR DEALER TO SHOW YOU THE MAGNIFICENT 

■ m 



• 



OTHER MODELS 7'6. 12'6, 21'- 



RA1S1GE OF 



it I/"JJ 



K 



YACHTS AND SPEEDBOATS 



Made by 






/ 



Tri-ang 





* 






r 




MONTH: "BOK/NG 




A GREAT RIVER." PUBLISHING DATE: 30th APRiL 







Li i E55J-3 f r:::33 £ M &M l\ EHtstta :»E: Earn: tasa ssaSlSJ bH2 SS 














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Editorial Office: 
Binns Road, Liverpoo 

England 



1 13 



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14 

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IS 




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ii 



144 
■ 11 



April 1938 



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LTTi ! a u!mi irri iti - f -— .a>£iME«aia ""»'"" ■"■ • ■ ■""•ii-ri mi— i *-■ •■* - ■ £"£*if" 

S: »t : : »: : { -r L:j £=• =: i E: ESS ris tiiRS SiL'SI at iff Ea ntiHln»S^»51S l^-!3s3s 



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StttKirtrtitti-ii 



lUIBBUMIIJlllll ■ I — * < 
4> J IjBBBJF B.l. IIIIMf'l - - . . 















With 



the 










Newspapers by 

■ ■ 

We are all accustomed to 







to news bulletins 
radio, and no longer regard it as a miracle that we 
able to learn what is going on in the world so easily 

in our own homes. 




and quicklv while sitting comforta 

JL ^r ^** 

Now we seem to be on the point of making another great 




forward, for in America trials are being 




of a 






device by means 

the latest 




of 

and 





complete newspapers, full of 

can actual!}' be printed 



in 




home. 







sim 




new device is operated by radio, 

. The type and pictures to be broadcast are con- 
verted at the transmitting station into electrical impulses 
by means of light 
the page, reflecting 
print to a photo-electric 





that moves across 



dark 




varyin 




es of the 

electrical 



currents that pass through the cell are then amplified and 
transmitted by radio in the ordinary manner. In the 
receiver, which is no larger than an ordinary radio set, 
a stylus or pointer moving across a roll of carbon-backed 



paper reproduces the print of the original, and the home 

sues from the machine in the form of long 
pages of convenient size can be cut off by 
means of a knife blade fitted into the receiver. 

In addition to newspapers, magazines and books also 




can be 




cast, 





the system in full swing 



owners of receivers will be able to get more printed 



matter than they will 




time to read! 



■ 



Recording Televised 





lsxon is 







an accomplished fact, and within 



a short time it should be 





» 




have 



just heard of an invention by means of which televised 

on discs similar to gramophone 



scenes 




be 





records. When such a disc is placed on the turntable of a 
gramophone and rotated in the ordinary manner the 
scene is reproduced on the screen of a television 
If this scheme proves practicable we shall be able to 
acquire a library of records of notable or exciting scenes 
that we can put on whenever we feel inclined. 




Captain of the "Sirins* 



» 



Many readers have written to me in connection 

on the crossing of the Atlantic bv the 

in last month's "M.A/." One of 



with the 






Sinus 

these letters contained an interesting note on Lieut. R. 
Roberts, R.N., the commander of that 





Roberts was a native of Passage West, County Cork 
and in the churchyard there is a memorial that com 



meliorates his pioneer voyage, which is described as 
"the greatest achievement of navigation since Columbus 







first revealed Europe and America to each other. 
Lieut, Roberts served with great bravery in 



>i 




engaged in suppressing the African slave traffic. After 

the memorial speaks of him as 
for enterprise and consummate skill in all 



referring 



une 









the details of his profession," which qualities led to 

command the first ship to attempt the 
Atlantic crossing entirely under steam. The result is 
described in 







words, "In accomplishing it he sur- 
passed not only the wildest visions of former days, but 

* - . .. « a .1 J* * 1 • _ '- _ _ A _ 



even 



science 








warmest anticipations of the 

s she had not dared to hope, and c 





an epoch for ever memorable in the history of his country 



and of navigation. The thousands 




shall follow in 




his track 

to travel with 

of the ocean." 



not forget who it was that first 





* 




marvellous rapidity that hig 




it 



ray 




There is little doubt that 








of that com- 



paratively small and overladen coasting steamer was due 
to Roberts' skill and iron determination. Later he became 



commander of the "British Queen/' and then of the 



"President," both of which were planned and built for 
transatlantic voyages. He hoped to win further fame by 



e <>mi n 





the first iron vessel 

but this hope 




across the 

■ 

unrealised. 



In the "President" he met an untimely end, for in March 
1841 she left New York and was * never seen again. 



The cover of 




Next 
month's 




tt 





1 1 




be a par- 



ticularly attractive one showing a great forging under a 
UOU-ton press. How giant presses of this kind work will 



/ 




be explained 
include also a 



the swamps and jungles of Malaya, m 






article. This issue 
1 description of drainage work in 

engineers 

* m m 

i 






nature, but also to deal 
around their camps at night and 




haunted their 
nothing of the ever-present leeches and 

also will be given of the Lincoln 









An 



a new 



lway passing under the Hudson River at New York, 
and another fascinating contribution will show 





what 




mens in the pits 




a 




ng motor 



car race. 




The issue will be on sale on Saturday, 30th April, and 

sure of obtaining his copy by 

with his dealer or news- 



every 
acing 

agent . 




er s 







193 



■ 



194 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 







□ 

a 

a 

□ 
a 
anannnnnnnnn 



Producing 




t 



000 




of 





Day 



□ 



By Harold J. Shepstone, F.R.G.S. 











cing 



WE are apt to look upon Canada as a 
country and little else. The Dominion is also a large producer 
of valuable metals, including gold, silver, copper, zinc, and lead, 
however. Among its famous mines the Hollinger, in the Porcupine 
district of Ontario, holds a unique place, for it is the largest gold 
mine on the American continent. Because of its rich veins of ore. 

_.___■._ W 






model equipment and 
that it will ultimately 

world has ever seen. 

In 1937 the Hollinger produced 




i 



many experts believe 



their property. Roads had to be cut through bush and swamp to 
get machinery in, and 800 teams of horses and many yoke of oxen 

n g 



were kept moving during 





summer of 1910, 




equipment and supplies. By 1911 erection of a 30-stamp mill was 
well under way when bush-fires swept the property clean, In 1912 
a disastrous strike that lasted for six months tangled everything up 



again, and no sooner had the mine recovered than the War of 



greatest 




mine the 




■ 







over £3,000,000 worth of 
During its life of 28 years it has yielded £51,000,000 worth of 

metal, but this huge total was really achieved in the 16 



1914-18 broke out and swept it nearly clean of workers. 

were several times in the early history of the Hollinger 





the cov 

years between 1921 and 1937. For the first 12"years of its historv 
Fortune presided over the activities of the Hollinger with a twisted 
smile. Over and over again it looked as if the enterprise were not 
worth carrying on. Then suddenly, in 1921, this mammoth among 
gold mines began to boom, and since then it has set up a new 
production record one day to tear it down the next. 

During 1937 over 5,000'tons of ore were hoisted up its centra 
shaft every 24 hours. From the beginning of mining operations until 
December 1937 there has 

- 

been broken and hoisted 
from this single mine 






mine when its backers were about to throw up the sponge. For- 
tunately they hung on, and by sheer grit and perseverance, backed 
by engineering skill, they built up an industry that is acknowledged 
as one of the wonders of the mining world. At Hollinger 2,700 men 
are now toiling continuously in a plant that cost £2,000,000 to create, 
and is turning out bullion with the same regularity that a factory 
might turn out axle-grease or pearl-headed pins. 

The surface workings of this single mine sprawls over 1,000 
acres. Underground, its tunnels have been cut backward and 
forward, up and down, through the Earth's interior, until levels, 

cross-cuts, shafts and the rest of its network of subways have 

such a length 

that they would run a 




more than 40,000,000 tons 
of ore, but 3,000 men and 



£2,000.000 worth 



of 



machinery, pushed to the 
limit, will not be capable 

of draining the scores of 




veins in it 
active 

present 

miners. 



during 



the 



of the 



■ 

generation 




of 

engineers of 
the mine have burrowed 
into the Earth's interior 

most a mile, but the 




for 

gold goes still deeper, and 
at least one expert has 
declared that it rnav con- 
tinue down far 

human react). 

Gold mining is always a 
gamble, but the gamble 





distance of 25n 




if 



it were possible 
to straighten them all 
out into one. 

There is no such thing 
as the end of the 

, At the surface, the 




w 





runs 





ed by nearly 900 men, 



working 



in 



eight-hou r 



A general view of the surface workings of the Hollinger Gold Mine, Timmins, Ontario. This Canadian 

gold mine is the largest on the American continent. 



shifts. Below, there are 

more than twice that 
number, to be exact 1 972. 
At the shafts, they split 
up and disappear in little 

a score or so in a 

dropping off at 

different levels and work- 
ing as independent units. 

In the gloom of the levels, 




faces 



as far as the Hollinger is concerned, seems to be how stupendous a 
total will be attained before the career of this great producer comes 
to an end. The present estimate is that it will vield erold to the value 
of £200,000,000 before that happens. Yet the site was going begging 



acquire 



a 



gray 



sameness that makes all miners look somewhat alike. This under- 
ground battalion, nevertheless, is a curious hodge-podge of nations, 



and in it are to be found MacDonalds, Manzinis, Ostojichs, 



little more than a generation ago. True, mines had been staked all 
round it, for the district is rich in the precious metals. Then one day 
in 1909 two men, Benny Hollinger and Alex Gillies his partner, 
made their way laboriously into Timmins, at that time a mere patch 
of brush with a few w-ooden shanties, some 500 miles from the 
nearest city and 45 mm the end of the railway. They wandered 



O'Rourkes, Shulaks, 

Schneiders, Holgevacs 




Costellos, 
of course Smiths. 




Landowskis, 




. and looked over the ground already staked. Old-timers 
directed them, freely and casually, to the site of the present 

er mine under the impression that the choice locations 
taken up and that thev were sending the newcomers 
to some of the second-rate property that was left. 

Hollinger and Gillies staked 12 claims and decide 1 ownership by 

* + ■--„ .*-._ — * _ •; * 






g a coin. Unsuspectingly they flipped for millions. Hollinger 

took the west and Gillies the east. Both properties were eventually 
combined, but Benny Hollinger's six claims were the foundation 

of j:he record-breaking workings. 

and forgotten, lying among the rocks that hid immense 

unes, was an abandoned prospector's forge. Beside it were some 
weed-grown workings. No other trace has ever been found of the 
. unknown who had wealth within his lingers and let it slip. It is 

4 certain that he never knew what he tossed away. Nor was he 
the only one. Hundreds of others had worn a trail over the quartz 
veins. A portage crossed Hollinger Hill, and many a pack-laden 
woodsman going over it had enlarged upon the difficulties 

the hill added to his enforced walk. 
Having staked their claim the two pioneers started to develop 



The men of this mixture of races have one particular trait in 
common, the desire to do more than a day's work in each eight 

hours. Much of the underground work at Hollinger is done on a 

contract basis, and time is not something to put in, but to work 
against. This contract system naturally is an added driving force, 
but Hollinger miners do not look like lazy men at any time. Nor do 
their homes resemble the houses of people inclined to tolerate any 
of the symptoms of indolence. They all have the incidental acces- 
sories, the odd trimmings and fixings of the man who gets enjoy- 
ment out of working with his hands. 

Underground the men work rapidly and almost automatically. 



They have every sort of mechanical assistance. Pipe-lines cam 



com 




air to every vein where 




ions are 








ing 








Drills 10 ft. to 12 ft. lorn,' bite viciously into the ore, and explosives 
finish the job. It takes 250 boxes of dynamite a day and thousands 

of cubic feet of compressed air a minute to keep things going. The 

rock, ripped out of the veins, is shovelled into cars, but if there were 
a more rapid, effective and efficient way of loading, the present 

method would be replaced. 

A glimpse at the other processes in the business of extracting 
cl makes it obvious that every step in the job has been developed 
to eliminate all waste effort. Affairs underground are controlled as 
carefully and precisely as the moves in a chess tournament. They 
must be. Even a comparatively slight delay could seriously upset 
the smoothness and swiftness of the process. The mill, hundreds 







t 



1 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



195 



— 






of feet above the miners* heads, has a large and everlasting appetite, 
and it is being operated continuously. 



Every 24 hrs. the sfeaggvring amount of 5,000 tons of raw ore is 



is neither more nor less glittering than the crushed stone on our 



CO 



III 





__-^ 







carrying seven 




apiece 




r l 



taken out. This quantity could not be removed with the methods 
in vogue a couple of decades ago, and even witli the most advanced 

the most modern mechanical aids it can be accomplish- 
w i th 




an incline carry it from the underground bin to the mill, when 
it is further ground by passing between rods, from which, after 
a solution of cyanide of potassium has been ndded. it 



* i 




in the form of a thick liquid m 



ud. 






and 



super-organization, 

are no romantic 

mine 

mules in this establish- 
ment. Everything is 

. where 









electrified 

possible, 

matic. On every level 

is being 



ore 



& 

















s a simple but 




P 



er- 



important service. In 
it, the pure gold dis- 

s< j 1 \f s a ssn --;- 1 r dissol V CS 

. and in order 



in w 




to give it every chance 
to do its work, the 

muddv mixture 



where 

taken out, a dwarf of 

an electric railway runs 

from vein to 

There are more 

200 miles of track in 

this hidden transports - 

an 
additional seven miles 

are operated above the 
surface. 

All the ore mined 

comes to the surface by 

central shaft, but 

are 23 shafts in A SCTaper Hoist at worn ra me 1,700-n. level of tfce HoMugcr Mine, which is equipped with the most modern 

machinery for winning the ore and transporting it to the crushers. 




poured into 
consisting of steel tanks 

50 ft. high, where blasts 

of compressed air are 

through and it 




20 hrs. 

By the 
time the 
d issol ved 






of that 




w 






g* 



sunk to different 



levels in the mine and having an aggregate length of over four 



gold 
The 
sediment that remains 

is paste, and the sooner 

it is eliminated the 
better. The mixture 

is washed and re washed 






miles. The levels that run from the shafts, one below the other 
like corridors in a tall office building, are at varying depths. Down 

thence down to the 

■ 



to the 300-ft level 




are 1 00 ft. 




800-ft. level the distance between them is 125 ft., and below 
that they are 150 ft. apart. The greatest depth reached by the 
shafts is 5,300 it, or just over a mile. 

As the gangs blast and drill at the face of the numerous workings, 



tests are made every few minutes, and 1,500 assays a day reveal 
the exact value almost to a cent of the ore that each little group 
of men is tearing loose. One of the most remarkable features of 
this large-scale drive for precious metal is the fact that the value 

of the ore per ton, as it is sent up, is practically constant. The 
veins vary in richness, but the orders are that the rock coining to 

crushers must be worth approximately eight dollars, 
or about 33/- a ton. This is not 








till it is clear of mud, and gold-laden solution can be poured off 
into separate tanks. This solution is as clear as crystal, and to 
a casual onlooker looks as if it contained less gold than the waters 
of an ordinary river. For all its innocent appearance it is a deadly 
poison, A mere sip means death, and every part of the building 

is plastered with warning signs. 

All that remains to be done in the mill is to recover the gold 

solution. For this purpose zinc dust is added, 
and the new mixture then flows into huge box -like filters, where 
it is squeezed through sheet after sheet of paper-covered canvas 

that retain the gold. Once a week the sheets are removed from 

On them is seven days' production of gold. Even 

recognizable, and perhaps the most accurate 
of it is that it is a dirtv sludge. The final 

of the mill, it is carried to the refinery, where the process it under- 

i B H — — 






the filters. 

it is 








high-grade ore. There are veins 
in Hollinger that run to three 
times its value, but by keepin 

steadily at the eisiht dollar 









ore 



. 



mark, and mixing the 
from different levels, 
with the low-grade, almost all 
of it can be utilized. 

On the 2,900-foot level, close 
to the central shaft, is the 

crushing plant. It is equipped 
with a 4 ft. by 6 ft. jaw crusher, 
driven by a 200-h. 

working at 120 r.p.m. Every bit 

every part of the 

mine goes there, either spilled 
down chutes from the upper 
levels, and hauled in from all 
parts of the workings. It is 

the mill by being 

into nuggets the size 
a man's closed fist, and is 
then ready for hoisting. 

The ore reaches the 
in 6-ton skips, which dump 











goes, although complex, is 
a standard one. The mixture 

i< smelted and the molten 

old poured off to cool into 
ars of bullion, Exactly 96 




per 




of all the gold in 



the ore is secured by this 
process. To get the remaining 



4 



cent, would cost more 



per 

than it is worth 



As far as bulk is concerned 



th 



e 



finished 




of a 







day's operations might almost 
be wheeled off in a 

lator. Bulk means 
however. Each small brick 

is worth /5.000, and a week's 
production is valued at nearly 

^60,000. 

The task of disposing of the 
waste mud from which the 






cvanide solution 



has 



been 




in 




The underground electric railway in the 1,200-fl. level. There are more than 200 miles of track. 



their loads automatically into chutes that carrv it to the crushers. 
From there it passes to the grinders, but as it does so limestone 
is added at the rate of 85 lb. of lime to every ton of ore. The grinder. 



or machine-age adaptation of the old mortar and pestle, crushes 
the rock endlessly. After the grinders come the rollers. The ore 
is crumbled to half -inch sizes between two steel cylinders, and 
dropped on an endless belt, ready for the mill-. Hanging over the 
belt is a powerful electro-magnet, which snaps up every bit of 
iron or steel that may have tumbled into the ore, taking out 
nails, spikes, bolts, fragments of piping, and even tiny bits of 
metal the size of a pinhead. 

The ore now passes to the 1,500 -ton storage bin, 60 ft. below 
the surface. Although it is about to pass through the final processes, 
there is nothing of the precious metal about its appearance, for it 






separated is a 

itself. There are several 

sand tons of it to throw awav 
each day. To haul it off and 

dump it would involve tremendous expense. The whole lake which 
once sparkled beside the mine has now been filled with it. As traces 
of the deadly cyanide mixture may still remain in it, a year must 
pass before vegetation of any sort will grow in the mine waste. So it 

is again mixed up, this time with water, and forced by powerful 

pumps through three miles of pipe line to be poured off into 
some abandoned claims. 

If the Hollinger Mine were to stop suddenly for good, the gold 
market of the world would doubtless feel the shock. Such a course is 
unlikely, for the Hollinger is continually adopting new ideas and 
methods. For instance, at the 1,100-ft, level it recently installed a 
repair shop, to which all machines that cannot be "doctored" on 
the job are brought for repairs, A factory at the surface is devoted 

exclusively to re-sharpening drills. 



* 



196 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 




□ FAMOUS ENGINEERS 

□ 

□ 

□ 
D 
D 

D 

□ 




II 



• 




Modern War 




DannnnnnnnnDannnnnnnnnnnDannnnDnnnnnnnnnnnn 




LAST month we described Ericsson's early days in Sweden and 
England, and told the story of the "Novelty," the engine that he 
entered in the 




*• 



trials, won by George Stephenson with the 
Rocket.*' Although Ericsson was unsuccessful in this famous 

speed of his locomotive and its originality of design 




contest, 

added considerably to his reputation as an engineer. 

After the trials Ericsson turned once more to marine engineering 
and soon became absorbed in the work with which his name will 

associated. This was the introduction of the screw 



alwavs 




propeller. As early as the 18th century this system of propulsion 
had been suggested by several scientists and engineers, including 
James Watt. The first man actually to use the screw with success 

whose 




was John Stevens, the American pioneer of 

story was briefly told last month by the Editor. A few years later 

Richard Trevithick, the famous Cornish engineer, proposed to use a 

screw driven by a steam engine 

to pro 



it led indirectly to his departure from this country for the United 

States, where he spent the rest of his life. F. P. Smith and other rival 
inventors of the screw propeller continued their experiments in 
England, but it was not until 1840-41 that the screw was adopted by 
the Royal Navy and introduced generally for British steamships. 
About the time of Ericsson's disappointment with the Admiralty's 
reception of his ideas he came into contact with Captain Robert F. 

mg in 






tton, of the United States Navv, who was 

England. Stockton was seeking funds to enable him to complete a 

canal in which he had invested his fortune. He was taken for a trip 

on that vessel, and was immediately convinced of the great value 
of the screw propeller. He at once ordered two iron boats for the 



United States to be fitted with Ericsson's machinery and propeller. 
The first of these was the "Robert F. Stockton," which was built by 
Laird Bros 





an iron vessel that he 

but the credit of 

- 

giving the screw propeller 

practical form and of bringing 

it into general use was reserved 



for Ericsson 




F. Pettit 



Smith, an English farmer, who 
were at work on the problem 
independently. 




firs t became 



in- 



terested in the problem in 
1833, when he 




engaged 



by a London carrier company 

with 
the 




London- 





ingham Canal. 



Later he made further experi- 




ments with a small boat 2 ft. in 
length 



tern, 



in a large circular cis- 

in one of the 

■ 

public baths of London. On its 
first trial the tiny vessel attain- 




ed a 




of more than 3 



m.p.h. on its voyage round 
tl io basin. 

1836 Ericsson's experi- 
ments were so far 





that he took out a patent for 




Birkenhead. This steamship was 70 ft. long, with a 

beam of 10 ft., and drew only 
3 ft. of water. Her engine was 
of 50 h.p. She was launched in 
the Mersey on 7th July, 1838. 
After being fitted out she was 
taken to London for trials on 
the Thames, 



successful 

it 




and 
"The 



was 





mi 




.. 




es in 



steam navigation" as the result 
of her appearance. The vessel 

was then sent out to the 

United States, making the 
Atlantic crossing under sail, 
and there under a new name 
she remained in service as a 

tug for over 25 years. 

About the time of the 

ally trial the engineering 

firm of Braithwaite and Eric- 
sson failed, and for a short 

period Ericsson found himself 

in a debtors* prison. He 
secured his discharge from 
bankruptcy, and eventually did 

some benefit in England 
from his invention, for after 
fighting each other for several 





e» 



his propeller. This consisted of 

a double screw, with right and 

-m, mm. - — — — _ - """^ 



A model of the propeller invented by Ericsson in 1836. The two screws rotate in opposite 

directions. From a model in (he Science Museum, South Kensington. 



left handed blades mounted on two shafts, one of which was placed 
inside the other. This double form is shown in the illustration on 
this page. It was applied in the "Francis B. Qgden," a vessel 45 ft 



long, with a beam of 8 ft. and a draught of 3 ft. This ship was 



specially built to 




his invention, the funds for this purpose 



being supplied by Mr. F. B. Ogden, the American Consul at Liver- 
", who was familiar with the steam engine and steam navigation 
and had 





in Ericsson's plans. 




screws were 5 ft. 3 in. in 
diameter, and the vessel attained a speed of over 10 m.p.h. on her 
first run on the Thames. The vessel also towed with success a 

of 140 tons, and a great impression was made when she 

at the 




towed the "Toronto, 

XT 

rate of 5 m.p.h. 



if 



a 




e American sailing 




Ericsson then tried to interest the British 
schemes. He succeeded in inducing the 








iralty in his 

Lord and other 

important officials to make an excursion on the river with him, and 
on this trial towed an Admiralty barge at a steady speed of 10 
m.p.h. through the reaches of Southwark and London 



success, but 



Limehouse, afterwards returning to Somerset House, 
inventor the 

astonishment 

in his plans ; 






seemed to be a com 

distinguished passengers showed little 

were not impressed. A few days later 





he learned that the technical advisers of the Admiralty thought 



years, Ericsson, Smith and 

three others who claimed to 

have invented the screw pro- 
peller decided to act together, and they shared in an Admiralty 
award of £1 0,000 for the use of the screw. 

In the meantime the inventor had been persuaded to cross the 
Atlantic Ocean, Captain Stockton assuring him that his work would 
be better appreciated in the United States. He sailed from London 
in the "Great Western" on 1st November, 1839, and after a stormy 
voyage arrived in New York on the 23rd. In his new home he 

immediately set to work to introduce his propeller, and by 1842 



some 40 vessels had been equipped with 



us pre 
it, Hi.< 



this work was the bu 







of the 




is greatest triumph in 

an iron screw 



steamship for the United States Navy that was the first battleship 
to be fitted with a screw propeller. This was of gun bronze and had 
six blades, its diameter being 14 ft. The engines of the vessel were 
much more compact and far lighter than those of British warships 

of the time and, in accordance with Ericsson's long cherished 



ideas, were placed entirely below the watcrlinc. Another feature 
was the fitting of a telescopic funnel, which could be withdrawn 
into the hull when required, for instance on coming into action. 



draught 



to the furnace was then supplied by an 





a 






to which power was applied on the stern could not 
be steered accurately. 
This opposition to new things, in spite of their apparent success, 
has been the experience of inventors of all ages. In Ericsson's case 



The 

blower worked by a small steam engine 

Ericsson continued to be busy for several years with a variety of 
projects, and then there came a stirring episode that won for him 
the greatest renown, not onlv in America but throughout the world. 

%mf * imf O 

civil war broke out between the Northern and Southern 

the early days of the war the naval yards at Norfolk, 

James River, were seized by the Southerners, 
as Confederates, and several vessels discovered 











f 






THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



197 



there were burned or sunk. Among them was the "Merrimac," a 40- 
gun irieate of 3,500 tons, This vessel was raised and found to be in 




good condition, and it was decided to convert her into a new type 
of ironclad in the hope that she would be able to break the blockade 
that had been established by the Federals, their opponents of 
the Northern States. Her deck was made level with the waterline, 
and a casemate 170 ft. long was constructed on her hull. This was 
strongly built of pine 20 in. thick, covered with 4 in. of oak, and 
over this were two layers of iron plating, each 2 in. thick. Its 
heavily armoured sides sloped outward at an angle of 35 deg., as 
shown in the upper illustration on this page. There were 14 ports, 



— 



warships that alone were available to oppose her, She rammed one 
of them, which immediately began to sink, and set a second on fire in 
several places before the ebbing of the tide compelled her to return 
to Norfolk. The "Merrimac*' suffered no serious injury beyond the 

loss of her ram, which remained wedged in the vessel she sank. The 
casualties on board were only two kilted and eight wounded, and 
for this price she had inflicted a loss of 257 officers and men in 



addition to destroying two ships 






It 



each provided 




guns, and to make this monster even more 



was at 




• 



critical moment 




the 



At 



Monitor' arrived. 





alised that 



formidable she was provided with a cast 

to a distance of 4 ft. 
three months after 



iron ram u 

was not 

tt 



It 




Orders had been given that she was to proceed to Washington, 

but the Federal commander in the James 

everytliing was lost unless she could check the all-conquering 

"Merrimac" and during 
"Monitor" 



career of the 




u 




PU07 Home position near 



work on the "Merrimac' had begun that 

Federal efforts 

to meet the tztzztzzzzz 

were !::—§§§:: 
made, and then :;;:;EEiE: 

the authorities ------«- 






the 





«« 



Minnesota, 



<* 



up 

the 



."FALSE BOW 



vessel that 



ffAAt seemed destin- 
ed to be the 

1 F rJ :::::::::- next victim of 

Jg==i=:=:::rir r the " 

^/:zi::::zzzzzzzz: mac." 




at Washington 

called for designs for ironclad 

warships. This was Ericsson "s 






Next day at 

8 a.m. the "Merrimac" again 



great opportunity. Me had 
already worked out plans for 




a 




and now he 






mm w * va * m * -v ■*• * b 



* * 







■ • ■ " 



M 



PHOT HOUSE 



came out, 




time to trv con 



» 







ote to President Lincoln, 
offering to build a vessel to 
destroy the Confederate fleet. 






elusions with the strange monster 

that had appeared so dramatic- 
ally upon the scene. Then began 

an amazing light. Neither 



After 




negotiations it 



The upper of Ihese two drawings shows the "Merrimac," with her huge armoured casemate. 
Below it is a similar drawing of the "Monitor." The famous battle between these vessels 

is described in this article. 




was decided to construct an ironclad in accordance with Ericsson's 

plans, and work was commenced at once at the Continental Iron 
Works, Green point, New York. 

Into the construction of the "Monitor" as this vessel was 
named, Ericsson threw himself with characteristic energy. He spent 




ending every 




and 



long days in the shipyard, supen 

continued at his desk, drawing up plans and preparing specifications, 
until far into the night. The keel of the vessel was laid on 25th 
October, 1861. She was launched at the end of the following 

January, and in February was ready to be handed over to the 

Government just 100 days after work upon her commenced. 
When the vessel appeared in public, the novelty of her con- 



struction aroused the greatest astonishment. 




many authorities 



she came to be known as " Ericsson's Folly," and she was variously 




described as "a cheesebox on a raft'* and "a tin can on a 
She was almost flush with the water. Of the portions visible the 
largest was the revolving turret in which her guns were mounted. 
She had two small funnels, which could be removed for battle, and 

behind these were two ventilating tubes through w 

sucked. Forward of the turret was the pilot house. The vessel's 

was 172 ft. and her breadth ' 




air was 



the " Minnesota " but 



• ■ 






ran ag 




seemed to be able to injure 
other seriously, and at length the 

"Merrimac" broke ofl to attack 

. When she once more floated the 



"Monitor" again attacked her, and her commander tried desperately 

r succeeded in damaging 
the bow of his own vessel, which was deeply cut by the edge of 

the "Monitor's" arm ourp late. 



to ram his persistent little opponent, but 




iior's" armour 

Then followed a lull in the battle, the "Monitor" returning to 
shoal water 




hoisting in a fresh supply of munitions before 
action. The Southern gunners now concentrated 
their fire on the pilot house of the "Monitor," with better results 



resuming the 



than in the first part of the conflict, for Lieut. Worden was stunned 
and temporarily blinded by a shell that burst outside one of 
the slits as he was looking through it. He had sufficient presence 
of mind to order the "Monitor" to sheer off, and she again retreated 

water. 

This was the end of the battle. The encounter was drawn, for 

of offen- 






neither ship could seriously injure the other owing to 1 

sive power, but the "Merri mac's" career of destruction was checked 



The "Monitor" had saved the Federals, for if she had not appeared 
on the scene at the critical moment the wooden ships would have 
be 



jen 




o 







41 ft. 6 in., with a tonnage of only 




_ 



or driven away and the blockade of the 

would have been broken. This result was due to 

■ 









She drew only 10 ft, 6 in. of water, 
and in this respect had a 

great advantage over her 
destined opponent, which 
could not follow her into 
shoal water on account of 
her greater draught. 

The turret, the central Apian view of the "Monitor." Behind the gun turret 1 arc the funnels 3 and the ventilator holes 4. Forward peril, and had brought about 

feature of the "Monitor" ~ ' " ----- 





Ericsson's genius 




ed by the skill and 



courage of Lieut, Worden. 



foundered 
&OW at sea m tne following 

autumn and 16 of her crew 

were drowned. During her 

short career she had 

the nation in a time of great 




■ 



- m v Hr m ■ H ^ H m T m hi v ^^h- -^r- h m *m ■ ^ 'W "■ ■ ■ "*- > W m t ^»» « ■ wr — — -w — ^— - — — » — ■* r — — — — — — — — — — — — - <■ - — — - — — ' — — — — — — — — — - — — 

is the pilot house 2, while 5 and 6 are the propeller and anchor wells. 



was 20 ft. in diameter and 9 ft. in height, and was rotated on a 
central pivot by means of a steam engine. It was protected by eight 









layers of iron, each 1 in. thick. In it were two II -in. smooth bore 
guns firing solid shot weighing 166 lb. each, and there were heavy 

iron stoppers to close the gun ports when the Runs were run in. The 






building. From this time onward wooden ships were 
place was taken by ironclads, and the turret that 



a revolution in naval ship- 

Their 




the "Monitor" was universally adopted. 
After the war Ericsson continued to s 








and improve upon 






deck was armoured with two thicknesses of £ in. plate, and there 
were five layers of 1 in. iron on the sides of the vessel. This armoured 
belt projected sideways in order to protect the hull from 

rammed. The pilot house was covered with iron billets 9 in. thick, 

the officers in charge of the vessel looking out through side holes 




only 




The 




in width. 



it or 



it 



was 



manned her underwent 




sea boat, and 




volunteers who 



hardships when she left New York, 



towed by a sm;ill tug, for the James River. The ventilation system 

broke down, and the engine room staff were nearly suffocated by 

fumes. Water poured into the vessel, on one occasion putting out 
the fires, and there was great risk of foundering. With a less resolute 
officer in charge than Lieut, 



the steam engine, his most important pioneer work being accora- 
pliMhed ih connection with the design of compound engines and the 
use Of superheated steam. He was a prolific inventor in many 
directions, and up to the end of 1883 he had planned and con- 
structed more than 1,000 different models and machines. He 

always had a preference for an engine using heat in a more direct 
manner than the steam engine, and this led him in his later years 
to spend much time experimenting with motors that would utilise 
directly the heat of the Sun. These took the form of large parabolic 
mirrors that concentrated the Sun's rays on boilers containing 

raised in this manner being employed to drive 







L. Worden, her commander, 




would never have reached her 




: mat ion, 




at 




on 




a small engine. 

He was full of energy to the end of his life. His home in New 

York was at once a workshop and a drawing office, where plans 

were worked out for his inventions 





she arrived in the James River. 









The "Monitor" was not a moment too soon, for the day had been 
one of battle, and the guns of the "Merrimac" could be heard as the 
Northern vessel approached. The Confederate ironclad had steamed 
slowly down shortly before noon to attack the doomed 



great care and thorough 
ness. He continued to work when he was seriously ill and even 

dying, and only a few days before the end was lively and active. 
He died on 8th March, 1889, at the age of 83, and with much 







cere mo n\ 



new 





was 




in the "Baltimore" one of the 



s cruisers, to his native land for burial 









MAGAZINE 




Lively Running 

(G.E. 




L.N.E.R. 






Sprightly locomotive' performance is a 

marked characteristic of the new L.N.K.R. 

that were 



non-stop Buffet Car 





on 



expresses 
the Great 



section between Liverpool Street 




Cambridge, These perform 




journey of 





55.7 miles in 65 min., including necessarily 

slow running in the me 

Loads are usually about 165 tons gross, 

and are light in proportion to the engine 

power employed, which includes "Super- 
Claud" 4-4-Os, and 4-6-0s of Great 
Eastern origin and 
of the "Sandring- 



.. 



The Silver Jubilee 



** 



An Unusual Wheel Arrangement 







"The Silver Jubilee" the first of the 
L.N.E.R. streamlined trains, has proved so 




that 



an additional 




of the 



distinctive type used on this train has been 



speci 





It was added to the 



On page 705 of the "M.M" last De- 
cember we referred to the preparation by 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad of the 
design of a steam locomotive of an unusual 



kind 



train last month. The number of passengers 
travelling between Tyneside and London 




having 





has shown a considerable 
the 



increase 



since 



commencement of the "Jubilee" 

1937 




service in 1935, the figures 
showing an advance of 40 per cent. 



driving axles 
by independent cylinders. We 
then described the engine as being of the 

e, but the Baltimore and Ohio 
Company have pointed out that this is not 








engine 




not be an 






n ' 



The original silver-coloured carriages of 






The Silver 





in have just 



eight-coupled one with leading and trailing 
bogies. Instead each driving axle with its 
cvlinders will be a 




ham" 

order 

time. 




ss 



to 
the 



In 
keep 
49.7 



miles between 

I 




en h am 



and 



Cambridge or vice 

versa have to be 

covered in a 
over "even time," 
although north of 




Bishop 's 



Stort- 



ford there are some 
quite heavy gradi- 
ents. 
, We are indebted 

to Mr, D. S. Barrie 
for particulars of 
an enterprising run 

with 1 58 tons tare 



> 




8547 




a 
of 
the former Great 

Eastern "1500" 




independent 
unit, and the pairs 
of driving wheels 
will not be coup- 
led. To be strictly 

correct, therefore, 
it is necessary to 
use the very un- 
usual combination 
4-2-2-2-2-4 to de- 

rheel 




the 



w 



arrangement, each 

of course re- 



i mu 



2 

f erring to a 



of driving wheels. 




ir 




*mes 

M 




two pairs of un- 
coupled driving 
wheels, each pair 

d riven by separate 
cylinders, were in 
service at one time 

form er 



on 



the 



S.R, 0-6*0 locomotive No. 530. This is one of the new class of 10 goods engines, constructed at the Eastleigh Works, that 

were described in these pages last month. Photograph by courtesy of the S.R, 




series, on the 8.30 p.m. up express. The 55.7 
miles were covered in 64 min. start-to-stop, 
a gain of a minute on booked time 
three severe slowhigs on account 





way 




and a signal 



check. The net time was 60 min. No. 8547 
accelerated out of Cambridge to a maxi- 

_ 

mum of 65 m.p.h, up two miles of 1 in 320 
to Great Chestarford, and speed fell only to 
58 m.p.h. on three miles averaging 1 in 150 
up to Iittlebury summit. Then came a 



p.w. slack at 
from 30 m.p.h- 




with 

m.p.h 



a recovery 

three 



miles averaging 1 in 270 to 
slack was 



up 

Elsenham. A 



m.p.h. to 30 

m.p.h. through Bishop's Stortford, and 
there was a final acceleration to 76 m.p.h. 

stretch from 








along the gentle 
Stortford down to Tottenham. The 49.7 
miles to passing the last-named station 
were run in 51 min. 22 sec, from Cambridge. 
There was a gain of nearly two minutes 

on booked time, despite the Newport 
slowing and two other checks between 
Cheshunt and Tottenham. This was a sound 
erformance, even though the load was a 
ght one for the engine concerned. 




undergone their annual overhaul, While 
the regular train was undergoing the 
overhaul, the service was worked by a 

spare set of blue-painted coaches similar to 
those in service on the "Coronation" train. 

The "Locomotive Stock Book" 



L.S.W.R. in this 

and were 
described as being 
of the 4—2-2-0 type. Even these four-figure 

rather awkward in 

with 4-4-0 or 




ions 




those days as com_ 

2—4—0, but now when we have articulated 







The Railway Correspondence and Travel 

announce that it is nut their inten- 



tion to produce a complete new edition of 
their "Locomotive Stock Booh" for 1938, but 
an appendix containing all alterations and 

additions to 3 1 st Decern ber. 1 937, in order to 

bring the 1937 edition up to date will 
be published. 



2-8-0 : 0-8-2 wheel 

arrangements and so on they do not seem 
so bad. It is to be hoped that the Baltimore 
and Ohio design is not extended to cover 
engines having five or six pairs of driving 



wheels in addition to leading and trailing 



wheels ! 




The combined volume will provide a 

JL ■ 

unique record for the years 1936 and IS 
with full details of locomotive stocks, en- 
^ines built, rebuilt or withdrawn, and all 
named engines on the main line railways of 
Great Britain and* Ireland. The 




also will contain the usual analysis of loco- 
motive types as at 31st December, 1937, a 
review of British locomotive practice for 
1937 and illustrations of obsolete classes. 

Details of price 

will be announced later. 



From Sheffield to Italy 



An interesting journey on the same rail- 
way wagon throughout was completed 
recently when a forged steel high-pressure 



converter manufactured by the 

_ «p 





date of publication 



Steel Corporation Ltd. travelled through 
from Sheffield to Italy by way of the 
Harwich-Zeebrugge Train Ferry. The forg- 
ing was 63 ft. 6 in. long and weighed about 
70 tons. It was loaded at Vickers Works, 
Sheffield, on a 100-ton bogie wagon 
belonging to the Belgian National Railways, 
and special arrangements for its safe trans- 
were made by the L.N.E.R. in con- 
junction with the Belgian National Railways. 




- 










MECCANO MAGAZINE 



199 




G.W.R. 4-6-0 locomotive No. 7800 



, «« n »r -i ..rr»o'I Torquay "?!?" {5< fi»« «>f »*»e new ''Manor" class bum at Swindon. These engines conform to the usual G.W.R. standards 
a general utility type some of the older and smaller 2-6-0s now withdrawn from service. Photograph by courtesy of the G.W.R. 





ace as 



L.M.S. Surplus Property 

Surplus railway property arising 

rationalisation 




from 




is 





amalgamations, 
and the abandonment of certain projects, 
a ~ ^ * disposed of in novel ways by the 
Estate Department of the L.M.S. 

sites formerly occupied for other 
purposes 10 are now let for such varied 
activities as a boxing stadium, furniture 

miniature zoo, badminton club. 
cinema. A disused railway tunnel has 

converted into a shooting range 
by a Glasgow rifle club. Engine sheds at 



The G.W.R. "Manor" 
The G. W. R. are constructing 20 general 

_i i _■ ^r * * fa ■ _^b ■. 



utility 
known 




■ tea 



otives of a new 



I 



Manor" class, for use 




passenger and express freight train services. 
These will have 5 ft. 8 in. driving wheels, 
18 in. by 30 in. cylinders, and a tractive 




and 
now 




effort of 27,340 lb., and they will weigh 109 
tons in working order. The working pressure 
is 225 lb. per sq, in. 

new engines will be 








PI ai stow, Camden and 





rough, in- 



of housing giants of the iron road, 
have become warehouses for toys, sugar 
beet and wine and spirits. 
The one at Camden, in 

north west London, was 
built by the London and 
Birmingham 
the 

opening throughout 
which is being celebrated 

year by the L.M.S. 

Disused 

South 



7800-19, and will be named 
following Manors: "Torquay," "Anthony, 
"Bradley," "Barcote," "Baydon," "Broome," 



If 








Cook ham 



t 3 



"Draycott," 



»» tt 



* 



Erie- 



Mote Streamlined Railcars for the G.W.R. 

The G.W.R. are to double their existiug 

fleet of streamlined railcars. It is just over 
four years ago since the first railcar was in- 
troduced on local services in the London 
area. In July, 1934, three other cars with a 
buffet compartment were brought into ser- 
vice on the Cardiff— Birmingham main line 
route. A year later, a further three cars were 
introduced on local services in the Oxford- 
Hereford, Princes Risborough-Didcot, 

Worcester and Malvern areas; and early in 
1936 another nine cars in the Bristol- 

wansea-Carmart hen-Ten by, 







ury 




win- 










premises in 
Wales are the 

meeting place of a re- 
ligious body; and two 
redundant laundries have 





sco me a piggery 

a furniture shop respec- 
tively. 

Six 

entirely or partly closed 
to traffic, are being used 





for 



among 




r things, 

gard en , 
e, a mens ' 
merchants' 
showroom. Another dis- 





Pontypool 

don, Bristol-Cardiff and the Worcester areas. 

In the spring of 1936, 
the first parcels railcar 

appearance in 





and 

speeded up the passenger 
trains by relieving them 
of parcels traffic. 

Railcar No. 18 was in- 
troduced on the Lam- 



bo i 
last 



irn Branch in April 
This car is con- 




structed on the same 
principles as the latest 
passenger coaches, and is 

of taking an addi- 
tional coach or horse- 
boxes and of 

■ 

ing light shunting opera 
tions. It is also used 

early each morning to 
carry mails from Reading 




to 







An L.N.E.R 



SI. Southend excursion train near East Romford. The engine is No. 8848 
4-4-Os of the rebuilt "Claud Hamilton" class. Photograph by M. W. Ea 




one of the very capable 
, Reading, 






used station is a Boy Scouts' headquarters, 
and another a petrol-filling station. New 
uses have recently been found also for 
many waiting rooms. The majority of 
which are rented to various organisations 

as 

n * 

is now used as a oractice room by the 



stoke," 

well," 

vilie" 



*t 




• i 



Frilsham/' 



tt 



Fringford, ' * 




and 



tt 



Hinton/ 



Garstngton 



1 ' 



r# 



it- 
Cr a n- 



The first of the class, No. 7800 "Torquay 

Jf *t1 i m -* ■"• — ■ 







g rooms. One such waiting room 
used as a 



Manor," illustrated above, is 



local Silver Band. 

The L.M.S, Estate Department -ad- 
ministers one of the largest estates in 



service 
of the 



to South Wales. 





in 



v-Swansea portion 
from Newcastle 




conn 






from 




River 



to the extreme North of Scotland, 

Northern Ireland. It repre- 
sents a rent roll of approximately ^1,300,000 






per annum. The total tenancies are 

90,000, including more than 23, 
houses and cottages, of which about 
13,000 are tenanted by railway employees. 




Names for L.M.S. Midland Division Trains 

Two of the accelerated express trains on 
L.M.S. Midland route between St. 

and Manchester (Central) are to 
be named. The 10.30 a.m. down train and 
the 4.25 p.m. return from Manchester, will 
become "lite Peak Express." The 10 a.m. 
from Manchester, and the 4.30 p.m. return 

fr«im uri'11 K«. .»„~«>.J HT».. »*_»_.■_ #f 



train will be named 




Palatine. 






car was illustrated and 
described in the "M.M" 
for May last. 

Model Railway Exhibition 

For their Annual Exhibition, to be held 




the 19th to 23 rd of 




mon t h , 



the Model Railway Club have taken the 

whole of the ground floor of the Central 




basement, 
exhibits. 




inster, in addition to the 




year the 

* 



carrying 



no n- work ing 

track and 



trade stands will be staged on the ground 
floor. In the basement there will be many 
working track layouts and a cinema. 
On the 19th the Exhibition will be open 
from 2 p.m. until 10 p.m.; on the re- 



maining days the hours will be from 
1 1 a.m. until 10 p.m. The admission charges 
are 1/3 




adults, and 
under 12 years of age. 




for children 



200 







□□□□ 




dl do-jljuldli.. iDnnnnnnnnnnannGnnnnnnnnnnn 




HOW THINGS ARE 







/\ 




to 









y The Editor 




annnnn 










RECENTLY I spent an extremely interesting day at the pottery 
works of Pearson and Co, (Chesterfield) Ltd.. at 




Whittington 



what might be described as a 









Chesterfield. Tins firm, which has been in existence for more 

than 127 years, produces all kinds of Bristol stoneware, lire-proof 
cooking ware, white and stoneware jars and bottles of every 

and a little art ware. I was taken in hand by the 
Works Manager, who proved to be not only an expert guide, 
but an extrer 

The many and varied products of the firm include those manu- 
factured from "stoneware" clay, which has a buff colour when fired, 

terra-cotta burning "red" clay, and "white" clay. The raw materials 

for the first two are obtained locally, the former by mining and the 

latter 

Cornwall and Devon. The earliest stages through which these raw 



ition. It is then 

turned and smoothed on a lathe, and if required a rim is cut in to 
take a string. Even at this stage the jar is far from dry, and it goes 




courteous and interesting companion 




digging; the 








materials come chiefly from 



materials pass give an impression of crudeness, but actually are 
extremely efficient in achievin 



to a stove that is heated by steam pipes to a temperature of 
from SO to 110 degrees F. This drying operation naturally varies 
with the thickness of the jars. Thin jars will dry out completely 
overnight; those with thicker walls may take two days.* 

" _ It is applied not only to the 
making of jars, pudding basins, bulb bowls, and similar circular 



This process is known as **j 












hard 




the desired object, namely, the 

elimination of every unwanted 

ingredient. 

To begi n 

lumpy raw 
shovelled into a container 
known as a "blunge pan, JJ in 
which they are swirled round 
incessantly with hot water for 

of from 30 to 60 
During this time 



but also to oval dishes of various kinds. The oval shape is 

attained by the use of jolly machines that spin eccentrically. 
Even more interesting is the potter's wheel. In its essentials this 
is the same to-day as it was thousands of years ago; the only 
important changes are the introduction of a power drive and an 
arrangement for securing variable speed control. A great variety 

of articles are produced on 
these wheels, and the crafts- 

displayed by the 
who are known as 

very remark- 



■ 

a 



mm 




o 






rotating paddle knives inside 
the pan are at work, and the 

final result is to reduce the clay 
to the consistency of a thick 
liquid, which is known as 



"slip 



When this slip has 



reached the required condition 




below 





is 



the contents are 

■ i 

run out through a coarse sieve 
into a large container or well 






^ iuw the -ground. j?rc 

here the slip is pumped up into 

a rotating sieve of very fine 

after 



mesh, 



passing 




ugh 



which it flows along a chute 
into a second well. The rejected 

matter is mainly bits of stone Attaching handles to bottle 
Or very hard clay, and bits of 





is 



throwers." 

W 



able. The wheel is merely a flat 
circular table ' '* 








rotating 



on a 



. The t hro wer 

throws a lump of clay of the 








of the wheel, and commences 

it with his 



uncanny s 






the formless clay 
assume the general shape of the 

product. The outer 

dimensions are gbfitroH cd by- 
means of fixed gauges, but the 
inside, and the 

_ 




ion of 

the product generally, depend 
to a very large extent on the 

of the thrower. 





The production of a 

jar or bottle by this process Is 

extremely fascinating to watch; 

" * " ost gets the impression 



one 




s. 



The illustrations to this article are by courtesy of Pearson and 

Co. (Chesterfield) Ltd. 



that the inert clay suddenly 
comes to life and shapes itself! 

Our cover this month shows an 



- 











the clay seam in the mine immediately underlies a thin seam 
of coal. Once more the slip is pumped up and forced through a filter 
ress, which consists of a number of iron trays with a cloth bag 
>etween each one, the series being pressed together by end plates. 

During this operation most of the superfluous water is eliminated 

through the edges of the press cloths. When the pressure is released 
the clay slabs are dropped out of the cloths and passed through a 
"pug mill" to render the clay uniform in stiffness, and from winch it 
is extruded in a solid continuous billet about 12 in. square. Lengths 
are cut off with a thin copper wire as required lor use. 

The subsequent proceedings depend largely upon the nature of 
the article into which the clay is to be shaped. For instance, the tens 
of thousands of jars used by a very famous firm of jam mami- 

urers are made here. The process apparently is simplicity itself, 
but actually care, skill and experience are demanded. A lump of clay 
of the right size for a jar of a particular size is thrown into a plaster 





A spectator is apt to wonder why the girls use what appears 

to be quite uncatled-for force in throwing the clay; but actually this 
seeming violence is necessary in order to force out air between 
the bottom of the lump of clay and the mould. 

The next step is to place the mould in a kind of vertically revolv- 
ing cup. The inside of the jar is then formed by means of a knife 
fixed to a lever arm that the girl pulls down to the required position, 

the outside taking its shape from the mould. The mould is now 




cen 




a rotating cupboard that is heated by 




air, and in a 



short time the clay contracts, owing to loss of water to the hot air 

and to the plaster mould, to a sufficient extent to allow the jar to 
be removed. From here the jar goes to a hot stove, where it attains 



experienced thrower at work at 
the Whittington Moor potteries. 



Many articles, such as cups, jugs, teapots, etc., require handles, 



spouts or tap-holes, and 




are added separatclv when the pot is 

h i a m "■ mt _ _ 



in the leather-hard condition. A handle consists of a strip of clay of 
the proper length placed by hand at the required point, moulded by 









the fingers to the correct shape, moistened 
into place. The simplicity of this process causes one to have mis- 
givings as to the adhering of the handle. As a matter of fact, 
however, the joint thus made is so strong as to survive any ill* 
treatment; the handle itself may be broken, but the joint remains 

sound- 

The glazing of the various pots is a separate and extremely im- 
~* — * -ic-^*-** :~* out a f ter (drying. The interiors of such 







articles as 7 lb. jam-Jars and bottles are glazed in a simple manner 
by pouring in a quantity' of the milk-like liquid glaze, rinsing it 
round, and pouring it out into the next pot. Any lettering or other 
marking that is to appear on the outside of the jar is carried out at 
"-'*- stage. The process is a kind of stencilling, the ink used being of a 
special heat-resisting nature. For glazing the exterior of such jars 
the girl picks up the jar by placing her hand inside it, and then 
lowers it up to the shoulder into a vessel containing the glazing 





containing the glazing 

The bottom of the jar is carefully wiped clear of glaze to 



prevent it from s 




while it is undergoing firing in the kiln. 



At this stage there may come a surprise for the spectator; he may 
notice that the lettering so carefully put on has disappeared! All 

during the process of firing the glaze 

through which the 



is 




however, 




changes into the form of a transparent 

lettering shows quite clearly. 




The glazing process is completed by turning the jar upside down, 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



. 



201 



and dipping the top in a brown glaze. 



Small jars and basins are glazed by submerging them com- 



pletely 



in the g 




liquid. 



Certain articles, particularly lidded ware, cannot be glazed in 
either of these manners, and for them the process is carried out 
by spraying the glaze on to them through nozzles by means of 
compressed air at a pressure of some 50 lb. per sq. in. There are 
also special glazes that produce a mottled or variegated effect, 
some with quite an opaque coloured finish, and still others that 
produce a matt or rough surface. 

The glazes are based on Corn ish 

stone and felspar, which are 
fusible materials, and are colour- 
ed usually* by metallic oxides. 
At one time the firing of clay 
goods was carried out entirely 

■ , * » • * - ■ 'j j - -- 

in 



the kiln, reaching the centre, which is the hottest zone, and then 



passing on into the cooling zone, emerging finally from the kiln 

300-ft. journey. 
After the articles leave the kilns and have cooled com 



a 



fter 



a 




they are inspected for faults and sounded for cracks. This latter 
process produces most extraordinary results. Each perfect product, 
when struck, gives out a ringing sound, .Many of these sounds are 
reallv beautiful, and the effect of the combination when several 




old intermittent kilns, 

with the characteristic shape of 
which most of us are familiar. 

At the Whittington Moor Works 

su ch dow n-d r a u gh t 

still used, but mostly for large 




are 



products with 




walls. The 



articles are placed in fire-clay 

1_ 1 ' _■ Ji_ il i 



boxes known as 



and 




saggars, 

these are packed into the kiln, 

skill being used to pack 
the greatest possible number 
into the space available. The 

filling of the kiln takes about two 

days, and when it is complete 
the door is bricked up and heat 

for about 60 hours. 




is 

A further 60 hours are then re- 
quired for the kiln to coot down 

sufficiently for the saggars to 
be removed. 

Most of the firing, however. 




girls are at work is that of a strange but fascinating musical instru- 
ment. Any article that by some 

mischance has become cracked 

to produce a ringing 




and 



note is lgnominiously 





ing department. 

of the 



we come to the pack- 



w 











a re 



straw, except when 

intended for export abroad or 
mto Lire, 



w 





must 



be packed in wood wool in 
conformity with the strict regu- 
lations in force to prevent the 
spread of foot and mouth disease. 
The articles are packed into 

made of ash poles and 




nches made pliable by soak- 

The packers work 



ing in wa 
at a 





the 




surprising 

skill with which 




distribute and arrange the vari- 



ous 



A 





is 



very 






Jam-jar making on Jolly machines. 



rge proportion of the goods 

into railway con- 
tainers on tracks running along- 
side the 

on the 
con 






with 



artment 
private siding 

the L.M.S. 




is done in two tunnel kilns of the muffle type, which are very 

much quicker, and are smokeless. These kilns are fired by producer 
gas, and a white heat is attained in the flues in the hot zone. 










The actual temperatures reached in the kiln in this zone are 



very high, ranging up to about 1,280 deg. C. 
The articles are loaded on cars of fire-brick bearing fire-brick 




. 




supports and divisions. The cars move along a rail track and enter 
the kiln in succession, one car being drawn out at the far end at 
the same time as one is pushed in. They are pushed slowly through 



An old trade that is still carried on here is the wickering of 

the making of baskets and hampers. 

I came away from this famous pottery works fee! ing somewhat be- 
wildered. I had never previously realised that there were so many 
jam-jars, teapots and pudding basins in the whole world; and as for 
the dog troughs — surely there must be more troughs than dogs! I 
found that the dog troughs were a mystery even to my guide. He 
told me that, although he felt certain they had supplied one to 
every dog in the country, the demand continued unabated! 




Migrations of 




Godwits 





NE of the most remarkable journeys made by any 
creature is the annual migration of a tiny bird, the godwit, 
between New Zealand and Siberia. Every year it travels twice 

with unerring accuracy over 8 t 000 miles of land and sea, arriving 

in Siberia frorn New Zealand in May and 

■ 

journey in September and October. 
The godwit is about the size of a pigeon, 




the return 




its plumage is 

g wings 



they did not really migrate at all, but hibernated in caves. 

It is easy to laugh at these legends, but even to-day there are 
many mysteries in bird migration. The movements of most British 
migrants have become accurately known, but it is not certain why 
J - 1 migrate at alL One suggestion is that in winter they fly south 
in search of insects, which are then scarce in our northern climate. 












coloured grey and brown. It has a long bill, and 

that have an almost imperceptible motion when the bird is in 

flight. It lives on the mud fiats of the sea coast. 

As the winter approaches in New Zealand thousands of godwits 
assemble on the northern beaches, as if by some prearranged plan. 
At a signal 'from their leaders they rise and take up a horse-shoe 
formation in the air, the stronger birds forming a tier at the 

rounded part of the horse-shoe. Thus these birds meet the first 
impact of the adverse winds encountered most of the way, and 
provide a shelter in which the weaker birds find the going easier. 
The first hop of the northward flight is across 2.0U0 miles of the 
Pacific Ocean to northern Australia. Thence the godwits fly onward 
over the Philippine Islands, Japan and part of China until they 
reach the coasts of Siberia, and there on the barren stretches of land 
between the mountains and sea they lay their eggs and hatch out 
the young birds. When the northern nights begin to grow shorter 

and "the young birds have gained sufficient strength, they set 

Zealand. 



hordes 







their winter haunts cannot support great 
in addition to the native birds. For instance. 




the warblers, rails and other birds that must migrate for the winter 
to Africa need more insects than our winters provide. They return 
north to nest because the average number of eggs to each pair of 
**"*? is four or five. The number of eggs indeed mav be a dozen or 
more with some birds, such as the ducks and partridges, and in 
certain cases there may be two or even three broods in a year. 
It will be realised that" if the birds stayed in Africa to nest there 
would be serious overcrowding, and some of them 
must seek other quarters. 

A bird that travels as far as the godwit is the golden plover, 
which on the approach of winter leaves its home in the far north 










of America to fly Southward over the forests of Brazil and other 
tropical countries to the wild and desolate regions of Patagonia, 




out on their return journey to r 

Many legends have grown up round the godwits. One old Maori 
explanation of their winter flight was that each bird was entrusted 

with the soul of a person who had died during the preceding year, 

r were for the purpose 




the journeys they made so regu 
of taking these souls to Paradise 




Even stranger superstitions than this have been connected 
with bird migration in past centuries. At one time it was generally 
believed in some parts of England that birds went to the Moon for 
winter, each journey requiring 60 days! Another suggestion was 






8,000 miles away. There it remains two or three months before 

again flying northward. 

Neither the golden plover nor the godwit is the world's greatest 
_., ^ «g^ however. This distinction seems to belong to the 
Arctic tern, a white- feathered bird with a black cap and forked 
tail that builds its nest on the shores of the islands to the north 
of Canada, apparently as near the North Pole as possible. There 




it spends the 




summer, and when the 




dark winter 






approaches it flies southward to the Antarctic. There it finds a 
season that is exactly like the one it has left in the far J north, and 
this seems to be more attractive than the more genial climates of the 
countries passed over on the way southward. The full journey is one 

of 11,000 miles, so that every year the tern travels 22,000 miles. 






202 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



DDnnananDnnnnnDDnnnnnnnnnnnnaDnnnn 
□ 

p 

D 

D 

D 





□ 




□ 

annDDannDaanDDDnann 



A 



T this time of the year, when the days begin to 




lengthen, large numbers of "MM" readers, probably 

to think about photography. 




as 



may 



m arlring 




care and eommonsense. 

We are sure that readers who, as the result of taking 
our advice, experience for the 




t he b eghv 
ning of the photographic 



it 




son, 



it 



if there can be 




to be one; but this 

year Easter is so late that 

before it 

readers will have with- 

c am eras 



arrives many 








• 






from the hiding places in 
which they have lurked 



through the winter. 




e space 
photographic articles 
throughout the summer. 




These articles 



will 



be 

specially written for 

readers who wish to get 

from 

their cameras, but who 
do not wish to be troubled 
too much 



really good 







time the thrill of 

de- 
velop, or their gaslight 

prints spring to life, 

want to sit down quickly 

write to tell us of 





their 



enthusiasm 



and 



excitement! 



And 



now 







our first, 







m 





most important piece of 
advice for those who have 
sought out their cameras. 
This is: "Make sure your 

is in good work- 
ing order before you set 
out 






on an 



or 



a 




oiia ay 



*T 




solemn instruction 



Much 

has 





written about how 
test a camera that has 



been laid 



This promenade fishing scene won second prize in the A Section of the August 1937 Photo 

Contest * ~ 






J. R. Tottle, Taunton. 





technicalities and, above all 



are 




prepared to spend a lot of money on their hobby. Here 
it must be emphasised that photography is not necessarily 



an ex 





l v e 



to 







iy. Any 




can become costly if you 



and in proportion to the fun and 



resort to the simple plan of 

es, developing these yourself, 



some 

Our advice is to 

ignore all this, and to 

film or a few 







with by a photographic dealer, and examining the results 
for defects. This test will show 



pleasure it provides, photography is a cheap 



This month s 




will 





camera, or 

else at all 



whether light is 
is sticking, or 
serious is wrong. The best 




> 

be confined mainly to a few 

hints for those 
who already possess 




came ras 



Subsequent 

articles will deal with every 






impoi 






photographic 
>ic, ranging from making 




exposures 



to 



producing prints. Later in 







matters will be included in 

the scheme. 

We hope that one result 
of these articles will be to 




many readers 

on 






r 



films to a local chemist to be 
developed and printed, to 
do this work for themselves. 

The fascination of carrying out the various photographic 

operations can be realised only by those who have 





a 



plan then is to 
photographic dealer and act 
on his advice as reg 
repairs or renewal 




s 




If there is nothing wrong, 

your first film turns 
out successfully, then shout 
"Hooray" and look forward 




many 

photographic 














of 

ntingl 
many years 
readers who have been con- 
sidering taking ud photo- 
graphy as a 
written to the Editor for 

advice, and their letters 
have shown that they were 

ut the 




have 



f, A Bit of Old England" by James Hampson, Edgware. This print gained second prize 

in the A Section of the June 1937 Photo Contest, 



greatly worried 





great difficulty of 






calculating 



correct 





it; and few tilings can 



lirst-class 




en 




thrill of 



one s own 



unaided efforts. There is nothing difficult about develop- 
ing and printing 







rules that lead 




posures. It is time that this exposure bogey was killed off- 
It is quite true that good photographs cannot be secured 



w 




reason 




correct exposure; but it 



is 




on 



equally 

side 




success 




extremely simple, and all that is needed is a 










e 



true that there is a wide margin of 
of the line of absolute correctness. 

The calculation of exposures for certain special kinds of 
work, and for unusual conditions, is admittedly difficult; 



» 



*■ 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



203 






but for all the subjects that §t M,M" readers are likely to 

come across, the exposure can be determined quite easily 

with the aid of a calculator or an exposure meter. A 

calculator is simpler and quicker than a meter, the only 

requirement being a little 

commonsense. 

For many years past the 

writer has depended en- 
tirely, and with complete 
success, on the exposure 
calculator contained in the 

Burroughs Wellcome 



that 





be con fin 










special subject selected, but that this should be 
in the foreground 
O t her miscellaneous 





a continuous interest, 
can then be tackled 






Photographic Handbook, 
price 1/6 from any photo- 
graphic dealer. The system 
is remarkably simple, and 
will be 

min 

the tables and the re vol v- 

ing device at the back of 






a few 

examination of 



the book 




e 




of 





all films 

plates on the market are 

given; subjects are 
fied 




as they come 

variety. 




to 







It is not easy to make 



really useful 






largely 



on 




clination. The 



is to ai m 



at 



ions 

as 
so 

in- 



main thing 
a series 



of photographs 



up 



together 





to form an 
connection. 

Such a series of photo- 
graphs might 






of 




es, 



flowers, 




animals, the sea and ships, 
trains, aeroplanes, motor 
cars, and other subjects 

numerous 







This typical holiday snapshot by D, Earle, Wembley Park, was awarded first prize in the 



simply 




with 



B Section of the 




1937 Photo 




est. 



tion. 

course 



The choice 




of 



to 



some extent 








is 




to 




• 1 




osu r e 






photographic illustrations; and extrem 
individual judgment. In addition to 
calculator, the handbook contains a surprising amount of 
information on all branches of photoeraphv. Next month 

to deal further with the question of ex- 
a var 

Another point on which advice is often asked is 
in regard to the best type of film 
to be used. The very fastest films, 



be 



may 




locality, For instance, some 
the sea 



difficult to secure; others 




s 





b oy s 



ects are 



from the 











aerodrome, where aeroplanes are seldom seen, 
photographer can find some practicable subject, 







ever 



and 




he 




to it 




will be able to secure 






before the dark days return a senes 









are pan- 
is sensitive to 

■ 

all colours, are unfortunately 

■ 





so 



slower 




to use as those 




n-ade, 








re 







are not recommended for the 



beginner 



Gen 



ei 



^ttP i^^^^r^^^ ^F 




*ing, 



it 



is a good plan to select not the 

fastest, but the 







of the film 



b 








one, 

an} 



In 



a 



particular manufacturer. 

later article advice will be given 

on panchromatic films and light 

niters and the wonderfully realistic 




that 



can 




e 



ob t ai n ed 



with them. 



Photography, 



like 



aU 



o 






is apt to lose its interest 



to work at 



it is not carried 

way, Man} r boys 

bought or been 
a camera, 

to 




gra 






aunts 








loto- 
uncles and 

other relations, and 

Mr 





that 
real 



wi 11 be 




hotocrra 

interest and 







of 

in 




Some special 
kind will 




sub- 
dealt 






Editor 
to 





s 



and 






advice 



on 



difficulties that 



sed 



any 




r 



crop up 




now a few words about 



the illustrations to 



which 



have 



■_ 





random from our prize-winning 
photographs. The upper 
graph 




the 




page is 



■ 



one of a type that can be ob 
tained at almost any seaside 



resort. Its 




feature is that 




posed; all 



the 



peo! 







that they are being photographed. 

^* i • * * i _ j_ . _ _ _ . . i_ _ 1 



Below it is 



a 



photograph 



of 



a particularly interesting 



of 



thatched 





senes 




of photogr 

ings 





of a 
old' 





le domestic pets; 




w 




these s 
ha usted 





have been 



"Sunshine and Mischief." A charming picture by A. B. Bishop, 
Bristol. Another successful entry in the 1937 Photo Contest. 



The upper photogra 
page h as 



no 



s 




ex- 





close 




more senses than one — lose interest in 
because there is no more obvious material 




will 




ost 








ays be found that 




who have been photographers for many years 
still retain their enthusiasm, have had some special 
subject to which they have devoted their main energies. 



everybody takes during a 




of a scene 
and happiness. 



qualities, but it is a good example 
of a type of photograph that 

ay, to provide a memento 

5 Of 




is associ a te c 1 wi 1 1 1 








Our last photograph is one that might be taken 



There is 




a wide range 





subjects wi 




the reach of every boy. It is not suggested of course 



on 



fun an d 




s un n 3, 



day 





in 



anc 





■ 




It 



radiates 



is a souvenir 




gives pleasure 



all who know 






THE 




MAGAZINE 




men 



coxswain 



A New Motorship for South American Trade 
Successful trials were carried 

January of the single screw mo 




stopped them, for theiL would 
probably have been cm shea between 

the life-boat and the rocks. He kept all 
on board until, with help from ashore, 
they were landed safely. 



After 
life-boat went 



again 

master. 



landed 

make 




further 

been swept away in the ship's boat while 

fending it off to allow his men to get 
into it safely. Their efforts were in vain. 



The coxswain has 




awarded the 



however, and they returned 
out altogether for 5| hours. 




r 



being 




and she was handed over 

by her builders, Harland and Wolff Ltd., 

Belfast, to the Lamport and Holt 
Line Ltd., her owners. This vessel is a 
cargo and passenger vessel for the South 





American trade, and has a length of 456 ft., 

a beam of 62 ft,, and a depth of 37 ft. 9 in. 
She 

her 




about 6,000 tons gross, and 

consists of a 



t w o - c y c 

double-acting 

Harland- 
Burmeister 

and Wain 

Diesel 

The 







Silver Medal of the Institution in recog- 
nition of his courage and leadership. Each 
the eight members of the crew has 
received the Bronze Medal for his gallantry 
and fine discipline, and the whole crew 
have received money awards. 

One of the two motor life-boats stationed 
at Pad stow was transferred to St. Ives to 
take the place of the wrecked life-boat. 



High Power Tugs for South Africa 



The 




built for the 

by Lobnitz 



of three powerful tugs to be 




early 



African Government 

Ltd. was launched 



in December from their yard on 






the Clyde, and is now nearing completion. 

She is named "F, Schermbrucher" and is 
for service at East London,. She has 
triple-expansion steam engines developing 

3,250 h.p., and 
is thus con- 
siderably more 

than 

T 



en gi ne 
"De- 




ne" is a 









.' 







of the "Delias" 



a 



n d 




s, 



* i 



the 
both 

built recently 

Belfast. In 

these 







design 



new 



considered 




are 
to 



be among the 
most striking 
of recent years. 






Thrilling 
Life- bo at 

Rescues 





the 




i wen, 



it 




S. 

the 

most powerful 

tug at 
town, which 
has a designed 
output of 
2,800 h.p. 

The gross 
tonnage of the 
new tug is 601, 

and her length 
is about 150 ft. 



ie is 




wireless 



'l he motorship "Dejane," built tor the South American trade. Photograph by courtesy ot Harland and worn Liu., ui t}eit<u>i. 








Until 31st January of this year no boat 

Royal National Life- 
Institution had ever capsized in 
service. The boat at St. Ives, Cornwall, 

overturned after taking off the 23 

members of the crew of the steamer "Alba, " 
however. The great value of the boat's 

righting ability was proved, for she 
came upright again so quickly that three 

of her crew were still on board, T. Cocking, 
the coxswain, was among those thrown out. 
When he reached the surface he was 

■ i 

nearer the shore than the life-boat, and 

could have got safely to land, but he swam 

back to the boat, as did the other members 
of the crew who were in the water. They 

IS of the rescued men back 



The 
Silver 




has also awarded its 






SI 

with 
trectioa- 

gear 
and in addition 
echo -sounding 




gallantry to 




Rees 




second coxswain, and the Bronze 



Medal 
of 




work 
crew 




Cottam, motor mechanic. 



life-boat, for their splendid 

rescue of eight men of the 

» 

Belfast. The seven other members of the 



steamer 




of 



have been 







crew nave Deen given 
of their services on this occasion. 
The weather at the time of the 







ft 



Fer- 



managh" rescue was reported to have 



been the worst for 20 




and the 



maximum force of the wind was estimated 

at 110 miles an hour, with a very rough 







then he 

into the boat, 

The engine of the life-boat was auto- 
matically switched off as soon as 

. Otherwise the boat would 
have gone on when she recovered, leaving 
the men in the water. U n f ort u n a t ely the 







ing handle for the 



engine was 




overboard. It was therefore impossible to 
restart, and the life-boat was driven on 



sea. The "Fermanagh" had 
on Woolhouse Rocks. With 



gone 



: 




re 







* 



equipment is installed. 

The remaining tugs to be 
are for service at Table Bay and Durban 
respec 

Eyston's Bid for Harmsworth Trophy 

Captain G. E. T, Eyston, holder of the 

world land speed record, has decided to 
chailen^ for the Harmsworth 
in 1939 

the motor-boat world, is offered for 
international competition, and has been 
held since 1920 by the American, Commo- 
dore Gar Wood. 

During 1938 Capt. Eyston is continuing 
motor car speed efforts, but as soon as 





the blue riband of 



in 



charge the life-boat circled her, and as she 

distress signals, a 



was not 

search for 





any possible survivors was 
Soon afterwards the vessel was 



made. 

floated off the rocks and drifted 

- 

northerly direction, sinking by the stern 



in 



a 



wi 





bows in 




air and her decks 






awash. Then survivors were seen to 

be aboard. The life-boat was immediately 




which 



he intends to give serious attention 
construction of a suitable boat. 

will be built under his 
own direct supervision, and not at any 
well-known yard. The last challenge 
the Trophv wa5 made in 1933, when 









Hubert Scott-Paine took "Miss Britain 
III" to Detroit and put up a splendid losing 
fight with his small and relatively low- 
powered boat. 






f 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 






205 



Diesel- Electric Ship for Lighthouse 

Inspection 

The upper illustration on this page shows 
the new twin screw Diesel -electric 
"Patricia" built recently by Smith's Dock 
Co. Ltd., of Middles- * 




Racing to a Race! 

A great international yacht race over 
a 350 -mile course will bcein on 







July 

at Warnemiinde, a port on the Baltic 
coast of Germany. This will be preceded 




A 



The Swedish 



Swedish Sailing Ship 



training 



ship 



a 




A. L. 



was 



bimgh, for the Cor- 

of Trinity 
I louse. She will be 




■. 



■ I HI 



used for the periodic 
inspection of light- 



houses, lifebuoys and 




navigational 
aids maintained bv 

- JU 

the Corporation, 
The vessel has an 







218ft 



length 



of 



with a 



breadth of 35 ft. Gin. 

and a depth of 1 6 ft. 




nsive use was 
made of welding dur- 
ing constructional 
work. 

The main propel- 

machinery con- 
sists of two 

engines of 755 b.h.p. 

at 







Chapman/' illustrated on this 

built in 1888. She is of 3,000 "tons dis 

placement, and is constructed of steel. She 

has no auxiliary en- 
gines, the only 
machinery aboard 
being that used for 



the 



generation 





of 

the 
ship's various ser- 

J- 

vices. 

The vessel carries 

3, who join 

between the ages of 





14 and 17 vears and 



are trained in 




to 



1 ^Fl 1 

become seamen. The 



per 




of training 
varies from two to 

six years. The ship's 





The new Trinity House inspection ship "Patricia/' which is equipped by Dtesct-cleclric machinerv, Photograph by 

courtesy of Smith's Dock Co. Ltd., of Middlesbrough, the builders of the vessel. 



full complement, in- 
cluding the captain, 

officers, crew and 

boys, is 267, Each 

year a world cruise 




375 r.p.m. Each is coupled to a D.C. 
generator of 518 kW output at 550 volts. 

control of each 




There is 

motor, and thus of each propeller, and six 

ahead and four astern can be 

means of the telegraph 








bridge. 

the 



navigating 



brid ge 



are the 



wheelhouse, the chartroom and the wireless 
room, and the navigating devices include 
radio direction finding equipment, an echo- 

*a_._ macm ; ne> submarine signalling 



apparatus and a searchlight. There 



a race 




their home 



by 

yachts taking part. Those 
Ocean Racing Club will start on 14th 

from Dover for Christiansand, on 




of the 
Royal 




many 
miles 



thousands 
is made, 




south coast of 



■ 




who re 




will be joined by German yachts from 



Heligol and. 

bined 





m Lnnstiansand the corn- 
will race south to Copenhagen 
on 19th July, and all the yachts will then 
go on to Warnemtmde on 24th j uly, where 
they will begin the international race two 
davs 



during which the boys have to w< *rk the ship 



It 



4. L. 





me 




man 



it 



ng 




is one of the most 

in the world 




to-day. Her lines are clean and strong, and 
she is fitted out in every way to be a floating 

home without any pretence of luxury for 



the boys, who live simply and work hard. 





is a large hold forward, with a 
heavy derrick capable of lifting 12 
tons. An electric windlass is in- 



The ship is named after A. L. Chapman, 
a famous Swedish naval architect. 

A. T 

International Motor Boat Races at Torbay 

International motor boat racing 



■ ■ ■ 

stalled in the forward 'tween decks, 
with three capstan leads for lifting 

buoys and other equip- 
ment. A large winch is fitted in a 
house on the after 








for use 

when towing lightships and other 
craft. 



The 



*t 




• _M 



5 



trials were 



conducted over the measured mile 
at Whitley Bay, and were followed 



bv 




at sea. The mean speed 



attained by the vessel was slightly 
over 14 knots. 

L.M.S. Vessels for Scottish Waters 

L.M.S. recently ordered 
three vessels from W. 

Ltd., of Dumbarton. These 

■ ■ ■ 

are designed for service in Scottish 

waters. Two of them are small 








of similar 



design 



for the Clyde. Each will be about 
60 ft. in length, and 
about 100 passengers, 
maintain a 



tween 



passenger 
13 roomie law 




service be- 

and 





is to be revived in 










a 




conn 

held 
to 







in 




and 

Torbay from 

July of this year. There will be 

races for various classes of both 



inboard and outboard motor boats, 

and the principal event will be the 
race for the Duke of York's Inter- 
national Gold Trophy, the premier 
award for inboard motor boats 

in Great Britain, 



The "Normandie's" 



Service 



During 1937 the French liner 
■Normmidie" made 36 Atlantic 

crossings between Havre and New 
York, covering a total of 122,400 

miles at an average speed of 28.87 



knots. Since entering service three 
years ago she has made altogether 
42 round voyages, covering more 
than a quarter of a million miles 
and carrying a total of about 
£0,000 passengers. 



New 



Attack on Water 

Record 



Speed 







and those aboard will 
excellent view of ship- 

. Mm 



have 

building activity on the banks of the river. 

The boats will pass the yard of John Bro^-n 



It is expected that Sir Malcolm 
Campbell will take "Bluebird" to 

The Swedish training ship "A. L. Chapman,* ' Photograph by A. Lamslcy, Soulhsca. Lake Maggiore again this year and 



and Co, 
new Cunard 







Clvdebank 
Star liner 



the 



where 
"No. 552" 



Launch of 



"No, 



552' 



f 



No. 



is now being built. 

The third boat is to operate a passenger 

and motor car 



North Channel 




service across the 
veen St ra n rae r and 



Larne, in Northern Ireland. She will be a 
twin**crew vessel capable of carrying over 
70 vehicles on one deck, and her 




between perpendiculars will be 308 ft. 



The new Cunard White Star Liner ' 
552" at Clydebank will be launched on 27th 




bv Her 3 




the Queen, and 



will be named "Queen Elizabeth." The date 

and approximate time have been so arrang- 
ed that the liner will enter the water in the 
roost favourable tide conditions. High water 



will try to raise the water speed 
record from the 129.50 m.p.h. he achieved 

_ 

in UKJ7 to 140 m.p.h. If he does so the 

I 

■ i ■ 



course over which the attempts are made 



will 

out 







the acceleration 
that 



shorter than that marked 

effort, as he found 
"Bluebird" 



maximum 




so 



great 



is at 4.20 p.m. and it is ex 




e.i\ that the 



hull of the vessel, 1 ,030 ft. in length, will 
glide into the river shortly aft 



er 2 p 



could be attained 

within .half a mile. The five-mile stretch 

of water used last year made it necessary 

to run the engine at full speed for longer 
than was really essential for covering the 

measured mile of the course. 



206 




MECCANO 





D 
□ 

naDnanaDDDDDDnnnnnn 



Some Interesting 






HE 




popularity attained 



during 



by the monoplane is shown in the fact 
more than 50 different aircraft of this type are 





to- clay 




in this com 










• 








of this total are 



low wing machines. Among the best known of the 
low wing monoplanes are the various 





aircraft 



produced by Phillips and Powis Aircraft Ltd., of Reading. 



b 




In this article we 




three of their current types 



t 



hood, as shown in our illustration. There is a large 
luggage locker behind thi 

A 130 h.p. D.H. "Gipsy Major*' engine is fitted, and 
enables a maximum speed of 145 m.p.h. to be 
The aeroplane takes oft after a run of 
climbs at the rate of 1,200 ft. per min. It can climb to 

22,000 ft., 
The fuel 





although 



t> 



the service 







es 



a 





:er 



v* 




r 






the 



Whitney Straight light cabin monoplane; 
two-seaters and are built of wood. 



all 




ing is 18,000 ft. 

are in the wing centre section, one on 

each side of the fuselage, and enough fuel can be carried 

for a non-stop flight of 400 miles. 

shown in the lower illustration 



The 




1 1 




JJ 



The 



a 



311 agister" is illustrated on' tin's page. It is a 



on the next page, is fitted with a far more powerful 









of 

Miles "Hawk" 

trainer described and 
illustrated in 
February 1935 
"MM.," which gain- 
ed second and 

laces in the 

up Air 






King's 
that 





and is of s 




interest as 

monoplane 

country approved by 

the Air Ministry for 

the initial instruction 

of R.A.F, pilots. It is 

used at the company's 

R.A.F. 

school 




at 




Reading 



This school is one of 



several owned 



and 





aire 



under the 






supervision of the Air 




engine 



than 






* 

is 



much speedier. 




engine 



is 



a 



Rolls- 



Royce "Kestrel XVI 

of 690 h.p. 



*# 




this 
gives the aeroplane 



an 



estimated 



top 



speed of 295 m.p.h. 

at a height of 
16,500 ft 



The 



Kestrel 




is 
modern in con- 



struction 



and 



has 



been designed for 



b 




vance flyin 



S 




tion, but can also be 
used for 
the work 
performance 
seater lighter, multi- 
gun fighter, or general 








to 




in 



training the very large 



Miles "Muniiter" trainer in the air. The blind-dying hood is drawn over the rear cockpit as the pupil 

there is learning to fly entirely by his instruments. 



purpose 

suitable 
bombing 

naissance. 




or 




recon- 
is so 










>er 



of 



• ■ 



program m e 




required under the R.A.F. 
all-round efficiency of the 




M agister 



n 



has also led to its adoption by other 




Magister 

***** 



and flying schools. 
The span of the 

are 

the spars of 

they are secured by metal fittings 





is 33 ft. 10 in. The wings 

centre section, 



designed that the equipment necessary for these various 
duties can be installed or removed rapidly. As a multi- 
gun single-seater fighter the aeroplane would have guns 
mounted in the wings and firing outside the radius of the 
airscrew. If required as a two-seater fighter it would be 



The 



split trailing edge 
aeroplane a steeper 

and 




s 



fitted to 







when 

the 




provided, with a rear gun turret in the fuselage. The wing 
centre section has been made deep enough to accommo- 

tanks and 




wings 



appro 





a 

A 

and the 



fixed type undercarriage of wide track is 

legs and the greater part of the wheels are enclosed in 
streamlined fairings that can be easily removed for 






date bomb cradles in addition to the 

retracted undercarriage, and hydraulic ally-operated doors 

for the bomb sight are fitted in the floor of the f u 

This sight is attached to a movable mounting 

be lowered into position when the doors have been 




can 










ins 




of the 





ing m 




ism. 




o cockpits are open and are arran 
behind the other with a complete set of controls 
instruments in each. Normally the instructor 



. 



one 






- . 




opened. The doors are large enough to permit a 
of the target before making use 
a camera mounted forward of the sight 
the target through the slot of this device. 




view 



sight, and 







cockpit . 








If the 

for wireless and photography 





the pupil is being trained in 






frying entirely by his instruments, the rear cockpit in 

which he is seated is covered over with a blind-flying 



is used as a reconnaissance aeroplane 

the 

with his sets' mounted in a quickly removable 
frame. The camera is placed behind the sets and is within 
easy reach of the operator. The bomb sight doors are open 











* 



THE 





207 



— 



■ 






for photography, but the wireless operator is protected 
from draught by an extra flooring attached to the seat 



he 
above 




direction- finding 




behind the wireless sets. 



loop is 




" Kestrel' ' are arranged in 
tandem and are fitted with dual controls. In this instance 



The two cockpits of the 



the pupil occu- 

the front 

cockpit, as by 

tins 



aeroplane. Its D.ll. "Gipsy Major" engine gives it a top 

of 145 m.p.h. and at the normal cruising speed of 




m.p.h. the engine is* running well below full power 



The cabin is entered through a large 




on the 




side, 

the 




wing. 



is reached by a convenient walk- way on 
It is thoroughly soundproofed on all sides 





arrange- 



ment the flying 

for 





him more 
closely re- 
semble those of 

the aircraft he 
will even 
fly. This cock 

pit is 

with 






hood. 
Both cockpits 

are under one 



roof, 



and 



are 



adequately 

warmed 



a 



controlled flow 







engine 



com 



partment by a 

sound- 





e- 



p roof bulkhead. 

Behind the two 
seats, which are 



side 



by 



there is 

cient room 




several 

cases 



to 



suit- 
be 



The Miles Whitney Straight cabin monoplane. An aeroplane of this type, flown by Brig.-Cen, Lcwin, finished second in the 

King's Cup Air Race last year, 



stowed. The 

wide .stream- 
lined wind- 
screen is mould- 

in one piece 
of Persoex . a 





of warm air from the engine 



cooling duct. 





opening 



the port side windows, 




windows on both sides are fitted with emergency catches 

so that the occupants can get out easily if the aeroplane 



should overturn when 




e 




is 




The windscreen is of 



the region 




the 






A i 1 

on to the 



special s 

sight so as to give an un distorted view 

target. Tins screen has a small panel fitted for use when 
flying in bad weather. A fixed window behind the rear 

cockpit gives the pilot an excellent all-round view aft 

before he 



special glass 

substitute, and this gives an exceptionally good forward 



view, 
roof to 




there are large side 




ows, 




one in 





a backward view. The various instru- 






ments are mounted on an aluininium-hnished panel 
in the centre of the dashboard. Full dual control is fitted. 



The wings are of the full cantilever 





are 





at their 



e, that is 
with the 

The flaps 

are in three sections, one hinged to the trailing edge 
of each wing and one hinged to the rear edge of the 



fuselage, and have the 







wing 




re 






The two 
craft so far described 



are 



light training 







nnes 




Miles 




Straight, 

illustrated 
and described in this 
article, is designed in 




for 



the 






owner- pilot, and is 




an 



excellent 



aeroplane 




gene 



for 

flying 



club 



in 




use. 



This is not the limit 
of its usefulness, for 

be 



it 



can 



adapted 
light mail 



carrier, 




use as a 




across the fuselage. 



The 



outer sections 



begin to operate be- 
fore the fuselage one, 

which is so 






when it comes 
into action air pres- 
sure forces it down 

and balances out the 






i » 



air 




ance acting 



e> 





This 




The Miles "Kestrel" high speed trainer, in which the pupil occupies the front cockpit. It can be adapted 



,-_ F. 



military' training in air fighting, light bombing and reconnaissance. 



upon the other two 

sections. 

is effected 

by means pi a light 

three-position 

on the cabin dash- 

board, which oper- 

a vacuum servo- 

its 














or for various military purposes. 



wing mono 





was 




prominent 

the many 



in the King's Cup Air Race of 1937. 

private owners of a Miles Whitney Straight is Brig.-Gen. 

Lewin, who is 63 years of age and lives in Kenya- He 





six years aero, and his enthusiasm is such 



year he 




Ms machine in the King's 



Cup Air Race. The General himself acted as pilot, with 
Squadron Leader de St. Leger as navigator, and finished 

hind the winner. 

a typical Miles light 




o 




2 min. 



The Miles Whitne\ 








engine. 



ror motor deriving 

power from the in- 
In the cruising 




duct ion system of 

of the lever all the flaps are streamlined into the wings 

and fuselage, and in the intermediate 

depressed for take-off and for high-wind 

of the lever all the 





are 






landings; in the 

flaps are fully down. A great advantage of this patented 

in the event of a mis- 






s 

- 




e m 






is 




judged landing, the flaps can be easily and quicklv 
returned to the up position for the aeroplane to make 
a fresh landing attempt. The aeroplane takes off after a 
run of 145 yards, and the landing run is 100 yards. 



**» 



208 



THE MECCANO 





"" 






i 







Awards 




Outstanding Flights 












The Segrave Trophy for 1937 has 
been awarded to Flying Officer A. E. 



British Summer Air Services 

Important additions are to be made to 

British internal air services 







the 

that will operate this summer. Railway 
Air Services will introduce a direct service 
between London and Glasgow, and this 
will m probably begin on 3rd May, the 
date of the opening of the Empire Exhibi- 
tion at Glasgow. It will be very convenient 
for the company's London-Glasgow passen- 
gers, who at present have to travel on 
the air mail service via Belfast. The latter 

will be continued, of 

course, as also will the 
company's service be- 
tween Glasgow and Bel- 
fast. 

Some idea of the ex- 



C 



Clouston for his 




flights* from 



England to Capetown and back last year. 
This Trophy is presented annually for the 



most meritorious transport achievement 
by land, sea, or air. 

Miss Jean Batten has been awarded the 
Gold Medal of the Federation A6ronautique 
Internationale for her record solo flight from 

4. r 

Australia to England in October 1937. 

Faster Aeroplanes for Air France 



The summer timetable of 
came into operation on 27th 




France 

. and 




it Marcel Bloch 220 monoplanes 



Ancient Gold Mines to be Reached by Air 

In regions behind the Andes in Bolivia, 

South America, are gold mines said to 
date back to the Inca period. These mines 
have been inactive for a long time owing 

to the great difficulty of getting men and 

equipment to them. A scheme is being 



completed for the construction of a jungle 



aerodrome near the mining area, however, 



so that modern mining machinery can be 

transported there by air from the nearest 




>ly base. Engineers, technicians, and 
other personnel also will be flown to 
the jungle aerodrome. It is claimed 
that the undertaking will be one of the 




est e n 




rises for the carriage of 



freight by air ever carried out 



tensive activities 

Railway Air 



of 







vices 



is shown by the fact 

iat this summer they 




will operate air lines 
between Liverpool, 
Birmingham, Chelten- 
ham, Gloucester, 
Southampton and 



south 




resorts. 



Along the south coast 
there will be frequent 

R.A.S. services linking 

Brighton, Hove, 
Worthing and the Isle 
of Wight. In the west 

Bristol, Cardifl, Exeter 
and Plymouth 
connected 



■ 







Service Records of 

Bristol Aero Engines 

Bristol aero engines 
have been employed 
by Imperial 
for their lar^e air liners 

and riving boats during 
the past 1 1 years, and 
on 3 1st December, 1937. 
there were still 74 of 
the early type Bristol 

"Jupiters" in use by 
the company, Between 
them these 74 
had then com 










total of 401,590 hrs. 
running. The average 
distance each had flown 
was 561,328 miles, and 



one had ac 





air services. 

At the end of Feb 



Bristol "Blenheim" bombers in course ol erection. The nose piece, the main hull, or rear fuselage, and the tail 

nit of each machine are built separately and are then assembled In the huge workshop shown above. Photograph 

by courtesy of the Bristol Aeroplane Co. Ltd. 



ruary last Jersey Airways Ltd.. added to 
their air routes to the Channel Islands 
re-opening their service between Ports- 







mouth and Jersey, D.H.86 four-en 
air liners flying at 145 m.p.h. are employed, 
and leave Jersey at 11.30 a.m. and Ports- 
outh at 2.5 p.m. During the past four 
years Jersey Airways Ltd. have 
more than 119,000 passengers, 

this total 33,300 were flown last 

together with nearly 1,000,000 lb. 
mail and freight. 

the 11th of this month North 

ern Airways will introduce regular 

air services between Hull, Leeds, and 

, to connect with the K.L.M. 
to 



replaced the Wibault 







Paris-London 



Clippers 



*$ 



service, 
time from 90 to 75 




of 





on the company's 

reducing the flying 

minutes. The new aircraft will enable the 

company to cope better with the 

passenger traffic on this popular route, as 

the Marcel Bloch 220 seats J 6 passengers, as 

against the 10 carried by the Wibault. It 

is a twin-engined all-metal monoplane with 
a top speed of 220 m.p.h., and its very com- 
plete equipment includes an automatic pilot. 

A crew of four is carried. 



flown 

miles. 

These remarkable re- 
cords are now 

rapidly added 

the Bristol "Pegasus 
,0," engines of the 
flying boats. The first of these 
aircraft was launched about IS months 

ago, and 













its engines have com- 
pleted over 76,000 hrs, running. The fleet of 
Empire flying boats is at present operating 



at the rate of between 10,000 and 12,000 
engine hours per month. 

Bristol "Pegasus X.c." engines are also 

of the 




In Trouble 




ain! 




services 





and 

ean cities. The 



and 

other important 
company will operate a regular air ser- 
vice this summer between Newcastle 
and Glasgow, where connections will 
be provided with the London-Perth 
air route. North Eastern Airways also 
operate the Humber Ferry service, between 



■ 

It is remarkable how the accidental 






omission of a word of four letters can lead 

to disaster! In the December "Air News/ 1 

under the heading "More Record Flights," 
the writer of the note intended to state 



that Miss Jean Batten holds the records 



En- 




bet ween 




both directions, 
in a moment 



Hull and 




and five return trips 



each day will be made this summer. 



for the fastest solo 
land and Australia 

Unfortunately his 
of mental aberration, omitted the word 
solo" — hence the deluge of protests 
from sharp-eyed readers! 



• i 



fitted in the lower com 
Short-Mayo Composite aircraft. 

Growth of Imperial Airways Traffic 

The continued growth of Imperial 
Airways services and of the traffic carried 



on them are shown 




the 1937 




figures recently published by the com- 
pany. In that year Imperial Airways 
carried 65,000 passengers, as compared 
with 35,000 in 1929, and 11,000 in 1924-5, 



the year in which 




began 



tions. The total number of 




es 



opera- 
flow n 



last year by the company's aircraft 
was 5,860,923, which is more than five 

Jr jt ^r 

Hints the distance flown in 192H, when 
the total was only 1,032,842 miles. In 

w * * 

1924-5 the total mileage flown was 835,525. 



4 



THE 





P 



209 







The long-range Empire flying boat • 'Cambria" which, with 

"Cambria" 



The 



the similar aircraft "Caledonia/* carried out a series of experimental flights across the North Atlantic last summer 
holds the record for the fastest crossings in both directions, The illustrations on this page are by courtesy of "Flight," 



i 








The 



coin 




ation Test of 
Composite 

-air separation of 
of the Short-Mayo 




-Mayo 




two 

sosite 

aircraft was publicly demonstrated at 

when 
out 



Rochester on 23rd February 





the second separation test was 

in the presence of a large crowd 

included the employees of the builders of 
the aircraft, Short Bros. (Rochester and 
Bedford) Ltd. A party of press reporters 



/ 





photographers were taken up m 
**" : ~" ' — * "Corinna" so that they 



Empire flying boat 

might have the best possible view of the 
demonstration, and two of the port 
windows of the aircraft had been removed 





The 



benefit of 
Com- 




photographers. 



Empire Air Mail Record 

The Empire air mail scheme, by which 

letter- mails are carried without special fee, 



Army Air 




and was accomplished 



in a total flying time of 27 hr. 50 ruin. 
The first stage of the flight was to Lima, 



boat 



was carried a stage further on 23rd Feb- 
ruary, when the Imperial Airways flying 

"Centurion" left Southampton with 

the first load of non-.surcharge air mails, 
totalling about five tons, for India, Burma 
and Malaya. In the reverse direction the 
first non-surcharge mails from those places 

were brought to England by the Umpire 

r j 










which 
All first-class 



living 

Southampton on 6th 

mails are now carried over the England- 
Australia air route as far as Singapore for 

lid. per £ oz. 

This extension resulted in the 




in Peru, and the six bombers covered the 
2,695 miles at an average speed of 173 
rrLp.h. At Lima one of the aeroplanes was 

The 

the second 



delayed by airscrew adjustments 





it 



h 




on 




Hi 




er five left 
stage, a 2,565-mile 
over the towering snow-capped Andes 
to Buenos Aires. The sixth followed, and 
all reached their destination safely, the 

average 

miles per hour. 

Lieut. Col. R. Olds, who was in command 

■ 

of the flight, had established two new 

non-stop U.S. coast-to-coast records for 

aircraft during the previous 

month. He 




for this flight being 209.5 




posite aircraft, 
with the sea- 
plane ' ' Mer- 






ii" 




cury 

to the back of 



the flying boat 
"Maia," took 
off from the 



River Med way 

and after 

climbing to a 

height of 
about 1 .000 ft. 

w 

circled round 

for about 30 



mm. 




a 



Verey signal 

it was fired 




• * _ - 






from the cabin 
of the flying 

boat, the pilots 

of the 

t i ve co m - 




fl 



ew a Boeing 
Flying Fort- 



re ss" 



from 

Langley Field, 
Virginia, 

to March 



Field, 



Cali 



fornia, a dis- 
tance of 2,317 

miles, and 
back to Lang- 




ley 

double 

was 

piished 




flight 
accom- 

24 



* 

in 



hr 



23 



mm. 



flying time. 

The Survey 

Flight by 

"Ceniaurus" 




An Armstrong Whitworth A.W.23 Bomber Transport in the air. This twin-engined monoplane is designed chiefly fcr the transport of 

troops, stores and other equipment. When used as a bomber the bomb-load is carried internally. 








ponents pulled their release levers, and only 
10 sec. after the signal had been given the 
two components separated. The seaplane 
rose smoothly and almost vertically from 
the flying boat and was soon ahead of the 
latter. The flying boat descended immedi- 
ately and taxied to her moorings, but the 
seaplane made several circuits of the district 
before making a good landing on the river. 

Names of New Empire Flying Boats 

Six "C M class flying boats will be operated 
by Qantas Empire Airways, the Company 
in association with Imperial Airways, when 

route is extended 
from Singapore to Australia, which it is 
hoped will take place in July. 

These flying boats will bear the following 
names, chosen for them by Qantas Empire 

kl tt** ___i___. ■ _ ii. us* I A_ n 



air mail load on record, for it is estimated 



that 



during 



the week ended 6th March 



at least 8i tons of mail were flown from 
Southampton to India and Singapore, 
and about 5& tons to Africa, while the 



incoming mails totalled well over 5 



to 



the marine Empire air 



Airways: "Carpentaria," " Coolangatta, 




■ i r f 



Corio," "Coolong," and "Cooee/* 



Thus approximately 19 tons of air mait 

a weight equivalent to about 1,250,000 

letters, were dealt with in a week. 

Record U.S. Long-Distance Flight 

A new unofficial world record for com- 

bined speed and range of flight in the large 
aeroplane class was set up recently by six 
U.S.. Army Air Corps four-engined Boeing 
"Flying Fortresses," The aircraft took off 
from Miami, Florida, on 17th February, 

with only one stop en route flew to 
Buenos Aires, Argentine, a distance of 
5,260 miles. This mass flight was the 



now available 
of the survey ilight by the Imperial Airways 
"Centaur us" from England to Australia and 
New Zealand, and back, mentioned in the 
February 1938 "Air News/'' They provide a 
remarkable tribute to the staunchness and 
reliability of the "C** class flying boats, the 
skill and judgment of the crew, and the ex- 
cellence of the technical equipment of the 

The "Centaurus" returned to 

structural and 





Southampton in 

mechanical condition, although it had to 

alight and take off in difficult conditions. 



During the return flight to 




the 





ever carried out 




the TJ.S 



"Centaurus** changed an engine at Alexan- 
dria because this particular unit had then 
become due for routine overhaul. The log of 
the flying boat mentions also such minor 
replacements as the changing of a valve by 
the radio operator. For all practical pur- 
poses, however, this memorable flight across 
the Empire and back was trouble-free. 



-i 




>■ 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 





HE opening of the electrified lines of the former Wirral Railway 
on 14th March added another chapter to the story of the long 
connection of Liverpool with railways. This city may be regarded 
as the birthplace of the passenger railway system, for "the Liverpool 
and Manchester Railway, opened in 1830. was the pioneer passenger 
line operated by steam locomotives. The Liverpool Overhead 
Railway was the 'first elect ricallv operate i system of its kind in the 
world. In 1903 the Mersey R 



Dncrnnnn 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 
□ 

D 

□ 
□ 
□ 

□ 

nnnnnnn 

comparing conditions with those on the several journeys that I had 
made in the old Wirral days in rather grim vehicles 
me about on their seats of a surprising degree of hardness! 
On arrival at Birkenhead North, which may be termed the 






until then a steam operated 
line, mostly underground, instituted electric working; and in the 

to Southport. now L.M.S. 




following year the line from 

property but originally belonging to the Lancashire and Yorkshire 
Railway 





converted. 




ng the first stretch of main 



line to be electrified in this country. 

This latest development comprises the electrification by the 
L.M.S. of the lines of the former Wirral Railway and the establish- 
ment of through services between this section and Liverpool in 

Railway, Previously trains on the 




conjun 

L. M. S. 

tion were 



with the 

Wirral scc- 




"nerve-centre" of the new electrified system, the party proceeded 
to inspect the electric sub-station and repair shops, and a description 
of the equipment is given later in this article. This done we again 
entrained, this time to ride over the other leg of the Wirral route to 
New Brighton. It was a si range o*j»erien<3B feo run alongside the 

sandhills between Wallasey and New Brighton in a purring electric 
train, where previously the fairly steep gradient up into New 
Brighton used to be "rushed" by the panting steam locomotives of 



the Wirral Railway, On the return journey too from New Brighton 



to Liverpool it was 




after years of familiarity with the 



change from one train to another at Birkenhead Park, to be able 



to run through from the L.M.S, on the Mersey Railway metals 



So we went back through the tunnels to I 




Cen 







where 




oper- 



ated between West 
Kirby and New 
Brighton, and Birken- 

head Lark, where pas- 
sen gers had to change 
to make connections 

— " 

with the electric 
trains of the Mersey 

Railway; but this 
change is now 







On the invitation 
of the L.M.S. I joined 



the official party pre- 



sided over 




Sir 



Josiah Stamp on the 



morning 



of 



14 th 





the Liver 



pool 



Central 



(Low 



Level) station of the 
Mersey Railway. 
Although a series of 

through electric 




the tour ended. 
The W i r r a 




covers 




single-track miles, 
ing sidings, and 
faster and more fre- 





t 



services 



are 



provided throughout 

the day between the 
Wirral district and 
Liverpool. The new 
standard timing of 29 

min. from West 

Kirby to Liverpool, 
including stops at all 
stations, replaces the 
average schedule of 
36 min. previously in 
force. On the New 
rig h ton line 




the 




journey 



One of the new three-car units for the through electrified services on the Wirral section of the L.M.S.. a 




I If 



the 



Mersey Railway. Fur the photographs and the information in this article we are indebted to the courtesy of ihc L.M.S* 



trains had been run- 
ning on the previous day as a kind of "dress rehearsal" to 
accustom passengers and staff to the new conditions, this was 
to be the occasion of the official farewell to the old order and 
of the inauguration of the new. So the first part of our tour of 
inspection took the same form as that of the journeys that such 
vast numbers of passengers have made between Liverpool and the 



now occupies 20 min 

instead of the previous 
average of 27 min. 
Through services are 

worked from West 



Kirby and from New Brighton at ten-minute intervals in the 
morning and evening rush hours, and also for a short period at mid- 
day. During the slack hours a fifteen-minute service is provided. 
On the Wirral hues the conductor rail is laid at the side of the 



running rails and is of the flat-bottomed tvpe, the normal rail 




line. A Mersey Railway electric train took us as far as 
Birkenhead Park, where a change was made into the last steam- 
operated passenger train to run between, there and West Kirby. 

this part of the run I recalled various "ghosts" from the Wirral 
locomotive past before the L.M.S. organisation really got into its 
stride. All were tank engines, two of them of the rather rare 4—4-4 

arrangement and some of them second-hand products 






obtained from larger lines, notably Wirral Railway No. 6, which 
became L.M.S. No. 6762. This was a standard 2-4-2 tank of the 

- - - 

mer Lancashire and \orkshire Horwich design, which for some 
time in the earlier grouping days proudly wore the red coat of the 
L.M.S, and was then perhaps the best engine on the Wirral line. 
The favourite engines latterly have been the Fowler 2-6-2 tanks of 
the L.M.S.. 




the first few of which were drafted to the 




section when new in April 1930, and created quite a sensation 
among local travellers who up till then had been familiar with 
small-boilered long-chimneyed engines, 

With a farewell to steam traction at West Kirby the party now 
boarded one of the new electric trains specially developed by the 
L.M.S. for this service. These are unique in that they combine the 
well-known features of the main line stock of the company with 
various characteristics peculiar to the vehicles used on suburban 
electric railways. As we glided along in the smooth-running well- 
sprung car, beautifully upholstered and appointed, I could not help 



length being 60 ft. At the joints bonding is effected by welded copper 
bonds and similar bonds are used for the running rails, the return 
ath for the current. A considerable amount of engineering work 
as been necessary to prepare for electrification. On the permanent 
way, the relaying programme was extended so that bonding could 
be carried out on rails with long life. It was necessary to extend one 
side of the triangular layout at Bidston. As this is on an embank- 
ment a considerable amount of tipping had to be done and two 
-culverts had to be extended. In addition a culvert near Birkenhead 
North had to be extended to allow of access to the new repair 
shop and new carriage 
The new trains provided by the L.M.S. comprise 1H three-car 

sets each consisting of a motor coach, a trailer and a driving trailer. 

The coaches are of the centre-gangway saloon type, and are of 
all -steel welded construction. The normal make-up of a train consists 
of a double unit of six coaches. The outer ends of each three -car 

■ 

unit are equipped with centre couplers of the buck-eye type, and are 
without side buffers. Such buffers arc, however, provided between 

the individual coaches of each three-car set, and the couplings 
there consist of a single slotted link connected to drawbars pulling 
on rubber springs. 







A.n important feature of the trains that makes for rapid handling 

at stations and also helps to reduce draughts in bad weather is the 

use of air-operated sliding doors. These are controlled by the guard, 
but push buttons are provided both inside and outside the cars, so 







MECCANO MAGAZINE 



211 



r 



• 



that the doors can be opened by passengers themselves. There are 
four doorways to each car. The trains are painted in the familiar 



L.M.S. red and with their flush-finished exterior surfaces they have a 
neat and handsome appearance. Under present arrangements these 

trains run on the West Kirby route only on week-days, the New 

Brighton service being pro- 
vided by the trains of the 
Mersey Railway. On Sun- 
days, however, the L.M.S. 

and Mersey trains are inter- 
mixed on the two services. 
The Mersey Railway has 

had a considerable share in 
the preparation for the new 
services. A certain number 



to avoid obscuring signals and to give clearance to anyone working 
on the signal posts. Except that Bidston and Birkenhead North 

- ■ V dl ^ Aft . . » - h -fe * r* J. 



have additional tracks to feed, all the sub-stations are alike as far as 
conversion and direct current distribution is concerned. The 
arrangement 



of high-tension switch gear and auxiliaries 



is 




alike 



at 



Meols, 



of new coaches 




ve 



been 



in use for some time, trains 



have 




increased from 



five to six coaches, and in 

order to accommodate these 
the lengthening of some of 
the platforms on the Mersey 
system has been effected. 
Older vehicles have been 







refurnished throughout. 

Electric heaters have been 
installed in view of 

■ 

use now of these trains in 

the open, such provision 
having been 



unnecessary 







were 



own route 













is almost exclusively in 

tunnels. In addition the 

storage reservoir system for 




Hoy lake, Bidston and Wal- 
lasey, but Moreton and 

Birkenhead North stations 

have more high-tension 
switch gear than the other 
four. 

A repair shop and car- 
riage shed have been estab- 
lished at Birkenhead North. 



Th 



e 



repaj r 

for 




electric trains 









three 




roads 



is well 

ordinary 

with 
it has 

each 




repair 
of accommodating 



a three-car unit. Two of 




with 




are provided 
:ion pits. A 15- 
ton overhead electric travel- 

ling crane serves the whole 



length of 
interesting 




An 



e equip- 






Part of the interior of the sub-station at Birkenhead North. Al this station current is received from 

the Liverpool supply and is distributed to the other sub-stations. 



■r ■ * p . - ■«• * rf- Jill tctlI^ i fc "-■'B 1 ■ ■ 1 ^ - * 

providing compressed air for the Westinghouse brakes has given 
place to the use of motor-driven air compressors. 

it. L 

As the Mersey Railway makes use of a side conductor rail with a 
centre rail return, while the equipment on the L.M.S. Wirral section 
involves only a side conductor rail with running rail return, it has 



been 




to iit up the new trains and the existin 





sey 



■ 





merit is a universal machine 

tool that combines the 
functions of a lathe, drilling 

machine, sawing and planing 
machine. The carriage shed 

is adjacent to the 

,^hop and has four roads 




trains with special switching arrangements to make them suitable 
for use on both systems. In the earlier stages of the work, too, the 

conductor rails on the Mersey Railway had to be altered in position 
to conform with the recognised modern standard adopted on the 
L.M.S, section. To facilitate the movement of passengers four 

lifts have been installed at James Street Station, 
Liverpool. They are reputed to 

be the largest electric lifts in the 
coun 







of accommodating a six -car train. In this shed 
rolling stock is washed down and receives daily examination and 
attention. No conductor rails are laid in this shed, but to enable 

trains to run in and out under their own power special overhead 

trolleys with "jumper" cables have been installed. 
Existing mechanical signalling arrangements and 

i 




ions 



have been retained on the Wirral lines, wit! 

and additions at various points to allow for the intensified service 

Modifications to the triangular junction layout at Bidston and 



the alterations carried out at Birkenhead Park have involved 
the rebuilding of signal boxes. At Bidston one cabin has replaced 
two former boxes, and at Birkenhead Park a new central cabin 

* ■ 

with 60 levers has been erected. 

The L.M.S. have taken the 








concerned with 




and they operate at a 
speed of 400 ft. per minute. The 
rsey Railway also have been 

alterations 
carried out at Birkenhead Park 
Station in order to provide for 

through running of trains 

_i — i_ ■ 

een 







Mersey Railway tunnel 
is made use of to carry the 

power cables from the supply of 






the 

the L.SM.S. sub-station at Birken- 

North. Each of the two 
cables is about 5,800 yds 




and for m 




of 



laid 



on battens 




brackets well up in the roof of 
the tunnel. The whole of the 

current distribution throughout 

the Wirral section is under the 
control of two men at Birken- 
head North sub-station. This is 






the electrifi- 

» ■ 

cation to modernise the stations 
on the Wirral lines. In carry- 
ing out this work, reinforced 
concrete has largely been em- 
ployed both for station build 



ings and foot-bridges, the re- 

suit being a clear-cut appear- 
ance in which utility and 
simplicity of outline are happily 
combined. Considerable 

_ 



lm 




provements have been made 
o the station lighting, waiting- 
room and booking-office ac- 

In anticipation 
of residential development and 

the increased traffic that it 




- f 






■ 



the only staffed sub-station on 
the system, the others at Bid- 
ston, Wallasey, Moreton, Meols 
and Hoy lake being remotely controlled from Bi 



An important pari of sub-station equipment, the transformer and rectifier units. These reduce 
the high- voltage alternating current from the transmission lines to direct current at 650 



a new passenger 

provided at 

Manor Road, between Meols 

and Hoy lake. 

The completion of this elec- 
trification scheme 



is 

■ 



a 




volts for feeding to the track. 



towards the co-ordination of 

the 




ser vices 



m 



in the control room 




electrified area and from 



■e is an illuminated chart 







s any variation or 





power supply throughout the electrified area can be 

At the sub-stations alternating current at 1 1,000 volts is converted 
into direct current at 650 volts by means of transformers and 
rectifiers, and is fed out to the track through high-speed circuit 

breakers. For the most part the high-tension feeder wires are of the 
overhead type supported on wooden poles. In four places it has been 
necessary to interrupt the run of a section of overhead construction 



It 



is an 





inauguration 



Of 




Merse^ide area, 
that on the same day as the 
e Wirral services the L.N.E.R. com- 




i 






menced to operate electric trains between Newcastle and South 
Shields, a development of the original electrification in the Newcastle 
area that was opened in 1904., The newly-electrified line is 1 1 miles 
in length and is an important suburban route used by five million 
passengers during the course of a year. New rolling stock of modern 

design, brightly finished both inside and out, has been provided. 

in 



an 




I hope to include 

an early issue of the *M.M, 



M 



on this Tyneside 




212 







MECCANO MAGAZINE 



naDDanDannnnnnnnnnnDnnnnDnnnnnnnnaDaannnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnDnnnnnnDDnn 

□ 
a 

B 






ury 

Intense 








By 



a Railway 




ngin 




D 
□ 





the minor railways of Great Britain that have long since 
lost their separate identity in one or other of the four great 
groups, there never was a busier line than the London, Tilbury and 
Southend. The "Tilbury" was indeed one of the earliest of such 

lines to disappear, for it was taken over by the Midland Railway in 
1912. Yet -— * - • • • 



that had been 

into one vast 








was 




many of its outw? 




ve 






res, 



iful locomotive livery, are almost forgotten, and 



as the 

its operation is entirely on standard L.M.S. lines, the fundamental 

unchanged to-day, and 
give the line a unique interest for railway enthusiasts. 




sties of the service 




Traffic 




the rush hours has to 




seen to be believed. 






The expeditious way it is handled at Fenchurch St. terminus is 
all the more remarkable in view of the fact that the station does 

to the L.M.S. at all, but to the L.N.E.R., and that the 

a train service which, if not as dense as 





not 

owning company w 
that of the L.M.S., cer 
tainly is very 

the 



the new pastime of sea-b;< thing 
London workers, and something 
ed in the wav of train services than 
roundabout route via Tilbury. 
So, some 35 years after the original railway was opened, the 
d i rect cut-off Hue was opened from Barking to Pitsea. The shortened 
route involves some stiff pulling over the Laindon hills, where the 
gradient is 1 in 1 10 for 3£ miles going east, and much the same for a 



slightl 



enou 





longer distance in the westbound direction, 
too, the junctions at both ends were laid 




manner as to necessitate severe speed restrictions by trains taking 
the cut-off line; these slacks are 30 m.p.h, at Barking, and 40 

m.p.h, at Pitsea. 

The next milestone in 









line was bought by the 









But 
has always 
worked under a disad- 
vantage at the London 
end, and its vast business 

has grown up in a curious- 










original line, which ran to 
Tilbury only, was pro- 
moted jointly by the old 
Eastern Counties Rail- 

and the London 



Blackwall 



way, 

and 

■ 

that ran from Fenchurch 
St., their object being to 






a short cut, by 
means of the Gravesend 
ferry, from towns lying 

south of the river, ri 

into their own territory. 

The two promoting com- 
panies were 

in the Great East 
ern Railway, and the first 
route to Tilbury was little 

more than a branch of the 
G.E.R. diverging from 
the Colchester main line 
at Forest Gate, and run- 






history came in 1912, when the 
Railway, The most noticeable 

change^ and one grea 

regretted by lovers of the 
distinctive in 





liveries, was the disappear 
ance of the old colour — a 






bright apple green, set off 
by much beautiful lining 
out. And with the familiar 






Midland style of painting 

there came many attempts 

with 

engines. 




work 
Standard 





a 




of these, and 
the "Class 2" 



not- 

7 ft. 





type, proved very 

. but it is of course 







A Suumtnd express hauled by L.M.S. three-cylinder 2-6-4 tank locomotive No. 2534 near Westcliff. This 

photograph and the upper one on the next page are by Mr, E. R. Wethersett. 



ning thence in a direct line to Tilbury, via Barking. 

A, fair proportion of the first trains used Bishopsgate as their 



impracticable to work 
such a line regularly with 

wh en at 

Fenchurch St ' the time 

be twee n 

outgoing turns is often as 

short as 12 minutes. The 
light engine movements 

before and after turning 

would in anv case be a 
serious hindrance to trauic 

operation amid such dense 

occupation of the line as 
occurs outside 




ter- 




terminus, while others travelled via the 




from the 



Great Eastern main line, at Bow Junction, to the Blackwall line 
at Stepney, and so into Fenchurch St. This even at the best of 

was a roundabout and congested route, and in 1 85S, four vears 




after the opening of the Tilbury line, a short cut was brought into 
use so that the Great Eastern main line was avoided altogether 




new section branched off at Gas Factory Junction, just beyon^ 
Stepney, and then ran due east through. Plaistow, where the 

locomotive works were established, to Barking. But 
even this shortened line still constitutes a more difficult start out 
of London than that of any other railway. There is a slack to 




minus. As indicating the pressure at which the service is worked, 
water columns are provided adjacent to the buffer stops so that 
incoming engines can be watered while unloading and re-loading of 
their trains is in progress. Then they back out into the engine siding 
just clear of the platform end, and in about five or six minutes 
they are "right-away' ' to Southend again on the next train. 
The huge Baltic tank engines built in 1912 by Mr. R. H. Whitelegg, 



son of Thomas Whitelegg, were soon transferred to the Midland 





and the various classes of 




2 tank turned out 




re 



m.p.h. through Stepney, and another to 20 m.p.h. over Gas 
Factory Junction; and it needs really good going if the first 7.1 




out to Barking are to be covered in 14 or 15 minutes. 
Great Eastern influence was quite predominant in the early days. 
The locomotives and carriages came under the superintendencyof 
Mr. Adams, the G.E.R. chief; and until 1880 the little company 



by the eider Whitelegg were left in sole possession. So 

mained for over 20 years, until the standard L.M.S. 2-6-4 tanks 

arrived on the scene. 

ays, when the heaviest main line work is almost ex- 
clusively handled bv the 3-cylinder Stanier 2^6-4 tanks, the old 







had no 



engines 




Company delivered some 



their own. In that year Sharp Stewart a 



nd 



fine 4-4-2 tank 



for the 



very nne i- *- z ranic engines 
design of which i\lr. Adams was certainly in part responsible, but 
with them from Manchester came Mr 





as 
With his 



supervising engineer, for their running in, 

arrival the individuality of the Tilbury really began, and after a 




time he was appointed locomotive superintendent. Traffic was 
going »p by leaps and bounds; the little seaboard towns of Leigh, 
Westcliff, Southend, and Thorpe Bay grew from summer resorts 



4-4-2s are mostly to be found on stopping trains routed via Tilbury, 
where they are still doing excellent work. Tilbury itself has regained 

some of its old importance, since it has become a great port. The 
liner specials for Orient, F, and O., Cunard. and Union-Castle s;i il in gs 
are an important feature of modern traffic. They are operated from 
St. Pancras and worked bv Midland main line engines such as the 
Class 2 4-4-0s or the standard Class 4 goods 0-6-Os. The Stanier 
2-6-4 tanks, which on account of their sirens are sometimes referred 
to as the "Tug -boat Annies," are admirable engines for the Southend 
expresses, and with them full regulator and 15 per cent, cut-off 
is the usual order of the day. Even on the stiff ascent to Laindon 
very little more is needed with loads of 

To illustrate the smart work needed with different classes of traffic 
I have chosen two runs, one with a fast residential train, and the 





t 



€ 



f 



* 





MAGAZINE 





on a smartly timed "intermediate" service with which 
several stops are made between the coast towns and the metropolis. 



3-cylinder 



o 





in 




form with an almost identical 



Saturdays o 



2,8 p.m. from Fenchu 




St. is a train 

good 







the punctual running of which is dependent upon e 
work by all of the great procession of expresses leaving the ter- 
minus at four to five minute intervals between 12.30 and 2 p.m. 
On a run with, this 

train it was interesting 



load, 315 tons. Starting from Benfleet, speed was worked quickly 
up to 51 m.p.h, before the slack over Pitsea Junction; then we 



went 





1 in 



110-132 of Laindon bank at a 




44-45 



m.p.h., and the 6.3 miles from Bcnfleet to Laindon were com- 

m V 4 h * Si* .r-v * I -A' A m "TV i A * . f ■ 






pleted in just 10 minutes, 





stop. 





was 




engine 

her 



to be hauled by 




of 



the large Whitelegg 4-4-2 




trai n 



tanks, No. 2148. The 

tare weight of 

was 278 tons, 
of 

and 




gers the 
at least 



non-corridor stock 

with passen- 

was 





load 
and pos- 



sibly 320 tons. For the 




3 miles the 




is 



carried on arches, and 

sea of 



are 

ver 




there 



across a 

housetops 
glimpses of 

of London and of great 





warehouses 



lining 



the 



river. We called at Step 



ney 




then set 





on our non-stop run 

27.4 miles* 

Close on the heels of 
an L.N.E.R. 




were 



brought 






stride; East Horndon 
was passed at 67 m.p.h. 
and 
rise s 
be lo w 




sequent 

not fallen 




m.p.h. 
steam was shut 

Upminster.The 7.5 miles 
from Laindon were run 

in the smart time of 
minutes. Here, pas- 
sengers are set down 

for the underground line, 




and also for the single- 
line branch to Romford; 

worked 

■ 

and 0-4-4 



the 



latter 



by an old 






engine equipped 
for push-and-pull auto- 
train working, 
further smart running 

place on the favour- 
run to Barking; 





60 m.p.h 



_ 




reached 




stand by 



L.M.S. 2-6-4 tank No. 2532 on an up express from Shoeburyness. The use of the destination board on the 

engine is a characteristic practice that has survived since the independent days of the Tilbury line. 



in 



start 




miles from the 



and 




No. 



Factory Junction was cleared, but 



L.M.S. metals we got ahead in fine 




Toughing 




through Plaistow, only 2 miles beyond the slack 




on to 
m.p.h. 
nearly 

us, we then eased carefully to 40 m.p.h. over the Little 
Ilford curves, and still further to 30 m.p.h, through Barking; 
but in spite of this fine recovery the 4,9 miles from Stepney had 

"*" * * well out, and 





*/(* 

^ 




m and Becontree at a 

Barking 







2524 went on through 

65-66 m.p.h. In spite of 

East Junction the 7.7 mile run 




taken 



U| 



m 





engine was now 




through the rapidly spreading suburbs of Becontree and Dagenham, 
where the line is level at first, we worked up to 47A m.p.h. The 



grades begin beyond Dagenham, but with the 



regulator nearly 



full open No. 2148 maintained 42-43 m.p.h 
in 150 past 




On 




se 



engines 




a bad signal check 

took only 121 minutes, and we had passed Becontree, 5.7 miles, 

in 7| minutes from the start. The remaining 7 A miles into Fen- 
church St. took 21 minutes inclusive of the regular stop at East 

Ham and a signal stop at Stepney; the only point of note was a 




liehtning start from East Ham wherein 50 m.p.h. was 

engine livery has gone, and the 

of Britain's greatest trans- 



in just a mile from rest. 

alt ho ugh the 



Thu 
Tilbury " 





there 







but a small 
concern, there is am 





evidence that the ex 



adjustment of cut-off once the train is well on the move; 
35 per cent, is about the usual figure, except at starting. 

The town of Upminster, 
lying astride a range of low 
hills and itself crowned 




are 





with a picturesque 
mill, is the terminus 
the London Transport elec- 
tric trains, which run along- 
side the Tilbury line, and 
it forms a gateway to the 

real Essex country beyond. 

The 7.7 miles up the bank 
from Barking had taken 
11 minutes, and then we 
were soon galloping down 



rpert 

handling and careful maintenance of engines that so characterised 
the old independent days is still well to the fore. The modern loco- 
beautifully clean, and however much we may 

regret the passing of the 

it m 
admitted that a black en 
gine with its red lining, and 

in 



the gen 











to 



Horndon. Touching 




m.p 




through this station 



* 



we now had sufficient im- 
petus to take 

to 






Laindon 




mile 

ascent was the 











and gold, 
can look very smart, when 
really well groomed as on 
the 

A detail of Tilbury prac- 
tice that has survived until 

the present day is the use of 

destination boards carried 
at the front or the bunker 



end 



of the locomotives 











A down stopping (rain headed by a large 4-4-2 








exhaust of the engine i 

ible from the 

of the train. We came over the crest at exactly 30 m.p.h., good 



tank hauling 315-320 tons. 

m.p.h., and 
there came a 




locomotive of the former London r Tilbury and 



in which they happen to be 
travelling. These indicate 
very plainly where the train 
is bound for and typical 
examples can be seen in 
two of the 

photographs. Mention of 
this recalls the practice in 




Southend Railway. This type of locomotive undertook the hardest duties on this line 






work for a non-superheater 

We coasted down to 

after the usual severe slowing over 

slack for permanent way repairs. We were now on that fascinating 

stretch of line between the hills and the sea, where the dormitory 




Tilbury days of placing on 
the lamp bracket in front of 
the engine chimney a small board bearing the letters "L.T.S.R." 
This together with the destination board, the screw jacks alongside 
the smoke-box and 






towns have grown up 



round 






and the lovely 



te pump, and on the 
buffer beam the rather prominent guard-irons and side coupling 
chains, gave Tilbury engines quite a complicated appearance 
when seen from the front end. Some of these features, except 

j - -i •- — _ _ a fa. — ^ ■■- * 




L.T.S.R. 



•I* 




are still to be seen 



old-world churches stand out as beacons among modern growth 



So far the driver had managed to keep off the tail of the 
in front, but now there were frequent whistlings for 



train 



and the last 2.6 miles trom Pitsea to the 
minutes. Our total time from Stepney was 
and the net time 38 minutes. 





stop took 51 
43 minutes. 



In the opposite direction of running I found one of the Stanier 



With the partial displacement of the "natives" from the Tilbury 
line owing to the introduction of L.M.S. standard types, some of the 
Tilbury tanks have wandered' a long way from their own system. 
They have been at work in various districts on the Midland Division 
of the L.M.S. , notably in the Birmingham area, although the last 
exile of this kind that I saw was at Sheffield! Some years ago too a 
Tilbury tank was tried on the Somerset and Dorset line. 



r t 



1 











• 






A Giant Hydraulic Accumulator 

Where a large number of hyd radically 
operated machines are installed it is 
usually necessary to have some reserve 
power in order to meet sudden or abno 
demands. This reserve is stored by means 




of a 




accu 




and the illus- 









tration on this page shows what is probably 
lk e largest hydraulic accumulator of its 

type. It was built by Glenfield and 





Ltd., Kilmarnock, and is in- 
stalled at Leith Docks. 

The accumulator takes the form of an 
upright underground cylinder fitted with 
a close-fitting piston or ram, 

24 in. in diameter and has a stroke of 

36 ft. A large weighted ballast tank is 




is 






fixed to the upper end of the ram, which 



is raised slowly by pumping water into 
the cylinder. "When there is a sudden 
demand for power the weight is a 



1 lowed 
to fall quickly, thus forcing out water 
into the supply pipes. 

The ballast tank of the Leith installation 
is 10 ft. 6 in. in inside diameter and 34 ft, 
deep. It is loaded with discarded granite 
roadway sets, which with 





itself 
give a total weight on the ram of 161 tons. 
The working pressure is 800 lb. per sq. in. 
The steel tower up and down which the 
ballast tank moves is 87 ft. 11 in. in 
height 






_ ground level. The 

cylinder are made of high grade cast iron. 
Each is in two parts. The sections of the 
ram are joined together by a threaded 
internal dowel, and those of the cylinder 

external flanges and 

Lamps for Film Work on the 

"Lusitania" Wreck 









A battery of 12 of the most pow 

for deep sea work 

of the equipment of 

John D. Craig when he descends 

ions of R.M.S. 



lamps ever 

form 





to film the 
"Lusiiama" 

have 




vage o 






this year. The new lamps, 

developed by en- 
gineers of the General Electric Co. 
Ltd., are built to withstand the water 



enc 




pressure 

of the Vessel as she lies 



around the hull 



in 




off the Irish Coast. 

mounted on a special 




of 

will 



^marine 



to floodlight the 



scene. 



stage 

The intense heat at which the lamps 

operate would cause them to fail in a 

few minutes if used in the open air. Owing 

to the cooling action of the water, how- 

it% -fa 

w U 1 be 




ever, their life on the sea 
about 25 hrs. The bulbs are made of 

hard glass transmitting ultra- 

in order to provide the best 

are 

and 





P 

light. 



I 




violet U 

possible photographic 

filled with a mixture 

argon, and are fitted with special rubber 







nitrogen 



insulation to insure 




ect waterproofing. 



A 



A Weir Across Niagara River 




concrete 






weir 



900 ft. 



in 



A 

length has been constructed across the 
Niagara River, about half a mile above 

the Falls. It has been built by the Canadian 
Niagara Power Co. Ltd., and is adjacent 
to the intake of one of the Company's 





hydraulic accumulator at Leith Docks that is probably the 
est of its kind in the world. Photograph by courtesy of 

Glcnfield and Kennedy Ltd., Kilmarnock. 



Its pur 



hydro-electric power stations. 

pose is to restore the level of the river 

to that existing in 1905, when the power 
station was built. The fall that has taken 
place since that time is due partly to 

a long period of abnormally low water 

es, and partly 





levels in the Great 

diversion of water from points 
am to other power plants. The 
weir also will help to preserve the scenic 
beauty of the Fails by giving a better 

distribution of water. 

Many difficulties were met in building the 
weir, for the river bed is irregular and the 
water rushes past this point at a speed of 
15 ft, per second. 




Rebuilding the Menai Bridge 

Bridge, built a little more than 



years ago by the famous 
Thomas Telford to connect the mainland 







of North Wales with Anglesey, is now to be 

ilt at an estimated cost of £228.000 in 




accordance with a scheme prepared by Sir 
Alexander Gibb and Partners, Westminster, 
consulting engineers. The masonry towers 
and viaducts of Telford's structure will be 
retained, but the wrought iron chains and 
the floor of the 580 ft. main span will be 
taken down and a new deck constructed. 
This deck will be carried by chains of a 
special high-tensile steel. 



The present 




has two carriage- 



ways, each 7 ft. 9 in. in width, and these 




be replaced by a single one 




a 



width of 23 ft. In addition, two footways, 
each 5 ft. wide, will run the whole length 
of the bridge, passing on the outside of the 
towers. The arched openings through the 
towers will be widened in order to allow 







for the passage of large vehicles. 

The bridge will not be closed during 

reconstruction, except for short periods. 

orary steel towers will be built 
round tho outsides of the permanent 

wire ropes passing 
over their tops will give additional 
support to the existing deck while the old 

chains are taken down and the 
new ones erected* The new deck will then 

the old one. The 



masonry towers. 






be erected 

final tasks will be the removal of the 
latter, the raising of the new deck to its 
proper level, and the removal of the 

temporary towers and cables. 



Huge Press for Aeroplane Parts 



Aluminium 




parts 




glas 
by 



aeroplanes are now being 
what is claimed to be the world's largest 
hydraulic £ress, which was installed re- 
cently in the works of the Douglas Aircraft 

any Inc., at Santa Monica, California. 

machine was built by 

Hydraulic Press Manufacturing Company 

of America. Nine 12-wheel lorries were 
required to transport it in parts from the 
makers* works to California, and when erect- 
ing. 






ed it was as high as a four-storey 

The giant ram of the press is operated by 
oil, which is pumped into the cylinder at a 
pressure of 2,500 lb. per sq. in. by a battery 
of centrifugal oil pumps, driven by two 
150 h.p. electric motors. The total force 
exerted by the ram is said to be 1 0,000,000 lb. 
The oil is pumped directly into the cylinder 
without 




through any interven- 
ing valves. This results in rapid working 
and renders the operation of the press 
extremely simple. The press is used for 
forming over 3,000 different parts, 
aluminium alloy, several of which can be 

at a single pressing. 




of 







V 



• 



* 





MAGAZINE 



215 



Three Rollers in One 

The upper illustrations on this page show 
two views of the "Cambridge Roller/' a 
new three -in -one machine that saves a 

■ i i 



A Coal-Oil Distillery for South Wales 






A new works for the low-temperature 



considerable amount <>f time on the farm. 
The three 
rollers work 



carbonisation of coal 
near Bridge nil 
comprise three 




is being cons 

Wales. 

plants; a coal -oil 







. 



in triangular 
formation. 



They have a 



The Shorter Surface Hardening Process 






Ihe lower illustration on this page shows 



a Shorter surface 



hardening 



machine at 



work on a nickel steel pinion shaft. In 
this machine the hardening is carried out 
by heating the surface with an oxy-acetylene 
blowpipe, followed by quenching at care- 



ful! v controlled 




Oxy-acety leu c 






roll i n l; 
width of 
16ft. and 

their use en- 

ables the task 

of rolling land 

to be 

out far more 

- 

rap idly than 

is possible 
with an 

ordinary 

single roller. 

The three 

rollers can be 

arranged in tandem for transport from one 
part of a farm to another. In this formation 

the overall width is only 8 ft 

allows the machine to pass through gates 
and narrow lanes. 

Building the Albert Canal 

progress is being made with the 



applied for this purpose in 1910. It was then 

tool, however, and the 
results were somewhat haphazard because 
of lack of uniformity in temperature and 

only became a 




new 




Canal in Belgium, 

being built to shorten the 




ures. 



ipe was first 



for surface hardening when 

M.B.E., M. LMech.E., 

de vi sed pre- 



c i s i o n 
machines to 

give complete 
con t r ol 



over 



the heating by 
the oxy-acety* 
lene flame and 








distance 

Antwerp. 



boat between Liege 

canal is about 70 miles in length, and two 

adjoining sections 

The new waterway branches off the 



are already in use. 



canalised River Mouse below Ltege, and 
is divided into seven reaches. It is to have a 
minimum width of 85 ft. and a depth of 
16 J ft. in the centre, and will be large 



enough to allow the passage of 2,000-ton 
Hhine boats. It will be crossed 




all of w 




w ill 




46 



distillery for the production of aviation 

petrol, Diesel oil and fuel oil, a carbonising 



i 



plant, and a 




e plant 









of tar acids and other chemicals. 

™ ■ 

Showcards Fixed by Magnets 



"g 



At recent exhibitions, a new type of 



descriptive showcard has been us 





by 



ar Allen and Co. Ltd., Sheffield, to 



be 



those 



stationary, except 



access to - 



the 



giving 
docks at Antwerp 



A New Element for 

Electric Furnaces 

A new type of electric 

furnace element capable 
of operating at 3,000 deg. 
F. was recently shown at 







tn 



Pittsburgh, 



U.S.A. The makers claim 

the element shows 




no signs of deterioration 
after 4,400 hours at this 
high temperature, and 

appears to be resistant 

to attack by 




oxygen, hydrocarbons, 
and sulphur and its com- 
binations. If the new 
element possesses all the 
characteristics claimed 
for it, it will greatly in- 
crease the usefulness of 
electric furnaces in in- 






dustry, and might lead to 
improvements in 
cookers. 




the subse- 
quent cooling. 

Maclu n e s 

have now been 
devised to deal 

with a 
r a n g e 

. These 
have heating 

units of vari- 
ous forms and 
capacities, 
to the size and shape of the 

m 

parts to be hardened, and this interesting 

and con- 
struction has made it possible to harden 
perfectly the surfaces of large, irregular 
and intricate parts. 

The quenching medium is guided along 
the path or area to be treated in an equally 
precise manner. Thus there is no necessity 

for heating the whole 

mass and plunging the 
parts into baths, as in 
ordinary case hardening, 



according 



development in 





which 




gives 



rise to changes in dimen- 







sion s 

scque 

machinin 



in 






grinding 



or 




necessary. 
With the Shorter pro- 
cess distortion of the 
mass is usually negligi- 
ble. Thus the hardening 
of parts such as gears, 
shafts, cams and dies 

can be made the last 



operation in 



their 






pro- 



duction, and they can be 

into service immedi 







a 

The result of the two 

operations is a change in 



the 



constitution 



and 



K 



structure of the iron or 
steel treated. This change 




in 





Sun act baldening a nickel steel pinion sna/t in a Shorter process machine. Details 

on this page. Photograph by courtesy of the Shorter Process Co. Ltd., 



ol tne process are given 
Sheffield* 



takes place 

surface layer, and there 
is a gradual transition 

m the hardened outer 




Steel Alloy for Magneto Construction 




various exhibits. The cards 






A 



# 



minium- 




newly-discovered nickel-iron-alu- 

magnet steel known as 

Alnico" is now being used in the making: 
of magnetos that are claimed to develop 
hotter sparks than those incorporating 




magneto made of other s 




The new 






mag 




is suitable for use with spark- 



ignition engines of all kinds. 



explain 

are lettered in white on a dark blue board, 
and at the back of each card is a bar type 

magnet of special cobalt steel, 
which is recessed to carry the screws that 
fix the card to it. The card can be attached 
firmly to any steel product or machine 
part. It is not readily dislodged, and can 
be placed in positions where an 
card could not be placed to stand erect. 




layer to 



the 



cen 




mass. 



which retains the core properties 
of the material of which it is made. 

™ * ■ ■ 
■ 

A New Asiatic Power Station 

A great new hydro-electric power station , 
which is one of the largest in Central Asia, 



is now in operation on the river Varzob. It is 

built in a gorge 9| miles from Stalinabad, 

and has an estimated annual output of 
55 million kW-hrs. 



* 



216 




MECCANO 








of 




Struggle 






D 

□ 

□ 
□ 

□ 
□ 

□ 

nnannaDaannanDnDDan 

x\ST January the heaviest ice jam ever experienced 
at Niagara caused the collapse of the Falls View 

Bridge, from which millions of visitors have gazed at the 





ara 




nnnnnDa 

□ 

□ 



□ 




Ice 





n 






famous cataract. Of the man\ 

the 
the 






across the deep 



15 ft. to IS ft. long and a foot square, were lowered 
by derricks and 
the arch close to 




against the steel girders of 

abutment in order to distribute 



the terrific pressure of the ice pack. 



Then was 




was 






nearest , 

the 



spanning 




be- 



river only a 

distance 

low the waterfall, 

as the 





illus- 
this 

page shows. It was 



on 



erected 



4'1 



years 



ago 



at a cost of 
£400,000. It was an 
arch structure, with 



a 



main 



span 



of 



840 ft, and two ap 




spans 



one 



190 ft. on the 





satisfaction when it 
was discovered, 
early on the morn- 
ing of 27th January, 
that the level of the 

water below 

had 




" 




sunk 
mean- 



^ 



bridge 
4 ft. In 

time thousands of 
spectators had 
gathered 



on 



the 
s of the gorge 

to watch the efforts 





of 



the 



en gmeers, 



who were constant- 



■ 



Looking across Niagara Falls to the Falls View Bridge, which was wrecked by ice pressure in January' of this 

Photograph by H. J. S heps tone. 



year 



United States 
side, and one of 

F 

210 ft. at the Canadian end. The deck was 46 ft, wide and 




msD 



ing 




points 




w 




carried two tramway tracks, two carriageways and two 




aths. It is ironic 




at it 












was 



was 





disaster, 



to replace a suspension bridge that 
during a gale in 1889. 



severe at Niagara at 




Conditions were ex 
Christmas, and continued into the New Year. There were 
heavy snowstorms and an abnormal ice cap was formed 

^^^m ■ - m. l 



on Lake Erie, 




Danger came with the break-up 
of the ice, for the floes were 
swept down the river and over 



the crest of the Falls into the 



which the River Niagara flows 




threatened. 

Shortly after 4 o'clock in the afternoon there was a 
sudden loud crack. The supporting steelwork of 
atth 




e United States end slipped off its support, the deck 
buckled, and the centre rose upward until it seemed that 
the framework must snap. Then the Canadian end of the 

with a low rumble the bridge 




ge collapsed, and 



sank to the ice nearly 200 ft. below. 

The collapse of the bridge was not the only disaster that 
the terrible ice jam 




brought 



with it. 




gorge. There they were piled up 
to a height of 50 ft., each sue- 



ceeding floe being driven under 
the edge of the pack and so lift- 



mg it 
came 




ier, 




so 



great 



the jam be- 
that severe 



stresses were imposed on the 




mors 




bridge 




the re- 






pressure of the im 



mense mass of ice. 
Fears for the 




of the 

structure began to be entertain- 
ed, and on 25th January it was 



closed to traffic. Next day the 




damage had already been done 



to water power plants above and 




w the 






site, and 
r e the Falls, and now there 
were new dangers to face. The 
fallen steelwork would have re- 
tarded the 











eventua 



would 

have resulted in the sudden 

release of millions of tons of ice, 
which would have been 











'US 







am, pro 




to wreck 






the Queenston power station and 
thus to cut off the electricity 



supply 



for 



Eastern Ontario. 







meas ures 




ore were 






Dynamite was placed at 

n ■ m _ -mb e. 



water 



in the gorge had risen 



The steelwork of the Falls View Bridge lying on the ice after its collapse. 

Photograph by R. G. Stott, Dundas, Ontario, 




vanous points in 







and 




40 ft. above its normal level, and it was 15 ft. higher 

it had ever been since 1909. 
In the meantime men were hard at work trying to 
avert disaster, in spite of continued snowstorms, A rope 
ladder was let down to the base of the abutment at the 






United States side, where the signs of strain were greatest. 
Down this men went on to the ice itself, clearing round 



the foot of the abutment and passing the ice dug out with 



pick and shovel to the 




Huge 




of tim 




twisted mass and exploded. This 
broke the steelwork into pieces that would not cause a 
serious obstruction to the ice, and thus safety was won at 
the cost of shattered windows for many miles around, for 
the 660 lb. of dynamite exploded did damage amounting 











to build 




in 




ace 



was soon 
of the one that has collapsed. This will occupy the 
same site and will be of modern design, and construction 
will be commenced as soon as 




; 



3 









THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 








nnnnnnnnannnnnnnDnnnnnnnncDnnnnnn 









HE expansion of the Royal Air Force that is now taking place is 

X providing wonderful opportunities for boys who wish to take up 

a career connected with flying. These openings may be 



Lirou 




under three main headings— aircraft apprentices, apprentice clerks, 

This article is written to help 



com ni 




and short service 

readers who are interested in these splendid opportunities by 

summarising the requirements and giving some idea of the prospects 
that are opened up. It is specially important that the age limits in 
each case should be carefully noted. Readers who seriously con tern- 



service from the age of 18 years. 




receive pay while under 



training, and at 18 years of age their commencing rate of pay as 
airmen clerks varies" from 21/- to 31 ti per week, according to the 



degree of success they attained on passing out of training. The work 



on which they are employed in offices at Headquarters of commands 



and other formations at home 





is varied in character. 



covering administrative work and shorthand in the case of clerks 



plate taking up an R.A.F. career should write immediately for the 
pamphlets that are referred to in the course of the article. 

Candidates for aircraft apprenticeship under the present Air 
Ministry scheme must be at least 15 years of age, but under 17 on 
1st August of this year. No previous trade experience is necessary, 
but those wishing to enter must take a competitive examination, 

which will be held at numerous local centres on 31st May next, the 
subjects being mathe- 

Enelish 



(General Duties), and accounting for pay and equipment in the case 
of other clerks. A limited number of airmen clerks will be permitted 



to re-engage to complete 24 years' service, and so qualify for an 

R.A.F. pension. Those who return to civil life after completing 12 



years' service will be given an opportunity of entering the R.A.F. 



Reserve, and of drawing a 




of £VM\ 



It should be mentioned that all apprentice clerks have an 



opportunity to \ 




eer for training as airman pilots, and 




and 

■ 

knowledge, and 

Nominations for 
this examination must 
received bv. Tuesday, 3rd 




who are selected become sergeant pilots and are normally employed 

on flying duties for six 
years. Airman pilots who 

qualified 




r 





have an approved 
School Certificate, 



first 
with 




in mathematics 



spe 




science 




subject, may be excuse 
the examination. The 
period of service of suc- 
cessful candidates will be 

years 
attain 

18 years. 

Readers who wish to 

know more about this 







i 




sc 




e 



should write to the In 



spector of 




icruiting, 



Royal Air Force, 





Kingsway, Lon- 
don, W.C.2, for a copy of 
Air Ministry Pamphlet 
15. which gives 
of conditions of service, etc 




are 





recom 




for 



sions 




c 



9)14 



mis 









Duti 



General 

eS branch, and a 



limited number of per- 

may 




com m 




also be granted in the 
Accountant and Equip- 





c lies . 






con- 




cerni ng rates 

promotion, etc, is given 
in Air Ministry Pamphlet 

9, a copy of which may 
be had on application 
to the Inspector of Re- 

at the address 



cruitmg 







given. 

Now we come to the 
attractive Short Service 










Bristol '■Blenheim" Bombers Hying in formation. They are one of (he latest types of high-speed aircraft 

which R.A.F. squadrons are being equipped. Photograph by courtesy of "Flight." 




and will be 




free on 




Apprentices receive Hiicient training in the trades of fitter, fitter 
(armourer), wireless operator mechanic, and instrument maker. 
These are among the most highly skilled and most highly 
trades in the Service. Another good point is that most of the trades 
have their counterparts in civil life. Thus the training gained by an 





Commission scheme. The 

1,750 

s were required by 
R.A.F. during the 
year ended 31st March, 

ined 





but so great was the response that this number was o 
by the end of January. About 1,300 of them were candidates from 
civil life, and the others were volunteers selected *~ ^ " 




airmen 



apprentice 




be of great value to him when 



he completes his 



career in the R.A.F. and returns to civil life. The course of instruc- 



alreadv in the R.A.F. The number of vacancies for Short Service 
officer pilots will be even greater during the year ending 31st March, 
1939, and applications are now being received from candidates 







tion in the trades just mentioned extends over three years. It is 
iven in a technical school, staffed by highly qualified technical 
structors, and is exceedingly thorough and practical. Apprentices 
also continue their general education throughout this 
and they are always making good all-round progress. 

Candidates sitting at the examination for whom apprenticeships 
are not available may, if of suitable age and standard of education. 

~ * " ' ' " * J Full particulars of this 




be offered enlistment as boy entrants 
scheme are given in Air Ministry Pamphlet 




a copy of which 



can be obtained from the Inspector of Recruiting at the address 





There are many 




*s 




to Service life who have no 









inclination towards a mechanical trade, and the R.A.F, apprentice 

specially to them. Candidates for 
mission under this scheme must be between 15£ and 17^ years of 




t scheme will 





age on 1st of this month, and they must possess either an approved 
School Certificate or evidence that they have attained an approxi- 
mately equivalent educational standard. Successful candidates 



s 




g then- 



attention 



■ 



undergo a thorough course of training in clerical dutie 
first 18 months' service, and at the same time Sf ~ 
is given to their general education and to physical training. 

are attested for 12 years* regular Air ~ 








as pilots, 
between 174 



in civil occupations to enter the R.A.F 

The chief conditions are that can 

and 25 years of age, be medically fit, and have been educated to 
about the standard of the School Certificate. Applications should 
be addressed to the Secretary (Dept. S.7/Y}, Air Ministry, Kings- 
way, London, W.C.2, from whom full particulars can be obtained 




A Short Service commission in the R.A.F. offers many attractions 
to young men of mechanical bent who are interested in 
Candidates accepted receive a complete training in. Hying. that 
cannot be obtained elsewhere, and their life is full of 
Successful candidates are entered as pupil pilots, and begin at once 
a two-month's course in elementary flying at a civil living 
school, where they receive 50 hrs. flying instruction in dual, solo. 






ing. They then become acting pilot officers on 
r#o about seven months' instruction at a Service 

on Service type aircraft. This instruction 



and instrument fl} 
probation and undergo 

iiying training 

includes formation and night flying, and a period at an armament 

training camp. Qualified pilots are then aooointed to an R.A.F 

unit, having 








at least 150 hrs. air experience. 
Candidates accepted under this scheme are appointed for fou 

list, followed by six on the Reserve, and a 



r 



years on the 




gratuity of £300 is paid at the end of their active list service. A 
limited number of permanent and medium Service commissions 
are given annually to Short Service officers. 



218 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 








BOMBAY: 

THE Port of Bombay is a comparatively modern creation, 
standing upon an island about 25 sq. miles in extent off the west 
coast of India. It owes much of its importance to its possession of 

the only natural deep-water harbour on the west coast, and 
to its central position and accessibility by sea and land. The harbour 
is on the inner side of the island, facing the mainland. It is about 74 

sq. miles in extent, and provides a secure shelter for shipping 

throughout the year, the Colaba Peninsula forming a natural 

breakwater that gives protection from 
the violence of the monsoon. 

The site of Bombay originally consisted 
of a cluster of seven small islands, of 

volcanic orijnn. but successive reclamation 




OF 







■ 



The Company decided to make Bombay their headquarters and 

to develop it until it became the first port in India. A Customs House 



and a warehouse were built, and ships sailing to and from Madras 



and 



Bengal 






were 




to call there. A mole alongside which 





= 




schemes have united them into one. In 

ancient times the group was inhabited 
only by a few Koli fisherfolk, aborigines of 
Western India, and remained undeveloped 

after places on the mainland had 

begun to grow and flourish. By the 10th 
century the west coast was thickly dotted 
with villages, and was extensively culti- 
vated for rice and other crops. It is record- 
ed that 200 years later the port of Chaul, a 

few miles south of the site of Bombay, had 
become the most prosperous in Hindustan, 
and carried on a large trade in ivory, 
precious stones, spices, and cotton fabrics 
with Egypt, Iraq and the Far East, 

The development of the 
islands began about 1260, when Bhima 

Raja, ruler of the Northern Konkan, the 
strip of coastal land off the centre of which 






, retreated "before a 
Moslem invasion from Delhi. He halted on 









Mahim, the most northerly of the group, 
and established a new capital there. His 






followers spread over the neighbourin 

islands, where they traded, prospered and 
increased, but by 1350 the group had come 

■/ l*_J Jf~ 

under Moslem influence, which persisted 
until the coming of the Portuguese in 1534. 

Under Portuguese rule the islands were 
divided into manors, or fiefs, most of which 
were allocated to various religious orders. 
Dissensions followed that did great harm 
to the trade of the islands, and opened the 
way for other European powers attracted 
by the 
with India. The English took a prominent 




small ships could be berthed also was constructed, and a shipwright 

was sent from England to supervise the 

shipbuilding and repair operations. 

Piracy was then a serious menace to merchant shipping. In the 

latter part of the 17th century Kanhoki 
Angria, a famous Mahratta pirate, appeared 
on the west coast, and for 50 years he and 
his sons were the terror of the surrounding 
seas. They had many fast, light-draught 



sailing vessels of from 100 to 400 tons, each 
mounting from 10 to 30 guns, together with 
rowing galleys of 40 or 50 oars, and in 
these they lay in wait in their fortified lairs 
along the coast, ready to pounce upon any 
unescorted trading ship that came within 

their reach. 

One of the strongholds of the pirates 



was 




Islan 




off the mouth of 



Bombay Harbour and only 14 miles from 



Bombay 




Kanhoki Angria himself 



died about 1730, but his sons carried on his 
piratical enterprise, and it was not until 
1756 that their power was final I y broken. In 
that year they were attacked by a British 

fleet under Vice-Admiral Watson in com- 

■ 

bination with a military force under Clive. 
Their chief stronghold Gheria, about 170 
miles south of 







was 




and demolished and their fleet destroyed. 



In spite of the activities of pirates the 
trade of Bombay steadily increased, and 
the port had to be enlarged. The exports 

consisted chiefly of cotton goods, pepper, 
silk, and precious stones, and rose in value 



from £493,000 in 1708 to an average of 



m iddle of the 



£758,000 about 20 years later. By the 

18th century Bombay 
merchants had opened up regular trade 




es of profitable trading 



The "Resolute," of 19,703 

Bombay. The illustrations 

by courtesy of ih 



tons, in the Hughes Dry Dock, 

to this 




are r 
t Bombay Port Trust 





part in this. Their first venture was disastrous, however, for of an 

by London merchants, which sailed in three 







ition 




ships from i >\ ymouth for India by the Cape route on 10th April, 1591, 
only a few survivors managed to struggle back to Falmouth 

more than three years later. 

A more satisfactory beginning was made in 1 600, when the East 
India Company was formed under the authority of a Charter from 
Queen Elizabeth. During the next 15 years Portuguese opposition in 
India was overcome and factories established at Surat, Cambay, and 

* ces. The Surat Council of the Company foresaw that 
Bombay, with its geographical advantages, was destined to become 
the "gateway of India" and in 1652 they urged its purchase from the 
Portuguese. This proved unnecessary, as on 22nd June, 1661, 

ombay was given to Charles II on his marriage to the Infanta 





Catherine of Portugal, and seven years later it was transferred b> 
Royal Charter from the Crown to the East India Company. 



communications with the principal seaports 
and inland trade centres of India, Arabia, 
Persia, and East Africa, in addition to 

carrying on a large trade with England. 
From 1735 until the coming of steam- 
ships in the following century Bombay was 
also famous as a shipbuilding centre, and 
many vessels were built there for the East India Company. Plans for 

a dry dock had been completed in 1686, but its construction did not 

begin until 1748. It occupied the site of the present Government 

Its length was 209 ft., its width 47 ft,, and its depth 




15 ft., and it proved such a success that within 15 years two more 

dry docks were built. 

Until 1813 the foreign trade of Bombay was in the hands of the 

East India Company, but in that year a Bill was passed in England 

that abolished the Company's commercial monopoly. This historic 

event opened the commerce of India to the merchants of British 

seaports other than London, and a great expansion of trade soon 

took place. Progress during the latter half of the last century was 
even more remarkable. There were many factors that helped in this 
growth. One was that railway communication with the interior was 
opened up in 1853. In addition the first Bombay cotton imll began 
working in 1854, and six more mills were opened during the 



* 



^ 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 





following five years, Steam coastal ferry services were inaugur 

in 1866 and then, in 1869, came the opening of the Suez Canal, 



cranes of 30 tons and 100 tons respectively, and a 60-ton floating 
crane, as well as se\ 





_ 

an event that revolutionised the 
In the 




e of the port. 






! % . 



runabout cranes. 
An interesting feature of the port is the "bunders," or open 




the lack of adequate industrial and dock 
accommodation was proving a serious handicap, and private 
companies carried out reclamation schemes to wrest from the sea 



additional 



land 



on 



which to develop their 
properties. Among 
these was the Elphin- 
stone Land and Press 



This 



was 



Company. 

founded in 1858, and 
carried out a series of 
extensive reclamations 



wharves and basins for native and coasting steamers. All are 
equipped with cranes, sheds, and other facilities for cargo handling, 
and in normal years deal with more than 1,250,000 tons of cargo, 

about one-fifth of the 

total tonnage of the 

, The goods are 
extraordinarily varied, 

including cotton, grain 
and 






on the western fore- 




acquired so much har- 
bour frontage 




in 



1869 the Government 
bought it up, and de- 



cided to place the ad- 



ministration 



of 



th 



e 



port in the hands of a 

public trust. In June 
1873 a corporation call- 
ed the Bombay Port 
Trust was created for 
this purpose, and also 
took over control of the 
pilot service and the 

lighting of the harbour. 






s, fruit and 

vegetables, sea-borne 

bricks, tiles, iron 






and timber, and there 

bunders at 
which petrol and kero- 
sene in tins are dealt 
with. 

To-day the principal 

exports of Bombay are 

cotton, oils and oil- 
seeds, piece-goods, and 



Almost 
cotton 



Ballard Pier Kitilvtav Station, from which the boat tr 

centres. The P. and O. liner seen in the 



The need for wet dock accommodation had been voiced as early as 




1810, but it was not until 1875 that Bombay's first wet dock, 
by a private company, was opened. This was the Sassoon Dock at 
Colaba, the narrow peninsula that forms the southern extremity of 
Bombay Island, This dock was hewn out of solid rock. It had a 
water area of only 3£ acres and an effective depth of about 18 ft,, 
and was designed to accommodate up to five ships of about 1,000 
tons net. It was purchased by the Government on behalf of the 
Port Trust in 1879, but for the past 20 years or so it has been used 
only for accommodating fishing boats and country craft. 

One of the earliest tasks of the Port Trust was to provide more 
adequate wet dock accommodation, and the Prince's Dock was 

opened in 1880 and the 
Victoria Dock in 1888. The 

former has a depth of 25 ft., 
and the latter one of 27 ft., 
and there is a communica- 



manganese ore. 
all the Indian 

crop is grown in the 
western half of the con- 
tinent. Thus Bombay is 
the natural channel for 
its distribution over- 
seas, and at the 
there is one of the larg 
est cotton depots in the 

world. This cost over £1,000,000 to build and provides accommo- 
dation for 1 ,000,000 bales. There are 20 receiving and despatching 
stations on its east side, and a railway yard with eight miles of track. 
The depot is extensively equipped with sprinklers in case of fire, 



Skins depart for Calcutta, Delhi and olber important Indian 
background is alongside the passenger berth* 




and has its own Fire 








Salvage Corps station. 



The trade in oil-seeds ranks second in importance to that of 
cotton. The chief of these are ground-nuts, a crop that does not 
require irrigation and has become very popular with cultivators, 
linseed, and cotton, castor and grape seeds. Rice, wheat, and other 
grain to the extent of about 200,000 tons a year are despatched from 
the port, mostly to East Africa, Aden and Arabia, and the depot in 

are stored is more than 80 acres in extent. 

On the import side first 

place is taken bv fine quality 
cotton goods and other tex- 
tiles, for although these have 



which all 




tion 




between the 



two. A third and larger dock 

was built in 1914. This is the 
Alexandra Dock, which has 
an entrance width of 100 ft., 
a depth of 37 1 ft. and a 
water area of 49£ acres, It is 
entered through a 

750 ft. long. 

docks, in which th 






coin 



under-water parts of ships 
can be inspected, overhauled 
or repaired, are essential at 
all large ports, and the Port 
Trust have two of them. The 

oldest is the 

Dry Do 

1891, which is 525 ft. 

and 65 ft, wide. The second 

is the Hughes 

opened in 1914, 

1,000 ft. long and 100 ft. 

wide, and can be divided in 

the centre so that it can 






been man 




on an 



increasing scale in India in 

recent years, considerable 

quantities are still imported 

Britain and 
Japan. About 10 per cent, of 
Bombay's import trade con- 

of various metals, in- 







cluding fabricated iron and 

brass, copper and 
aluminium. Next in import- 
ance comes machinery, 
which includes textile and 
railway plant. 

During recent years there 
has been a lar^e increase in 
the quantities of mineral oils 

in bulk, chiefly 
from Persia, Burma, 

Borneo and the 

Petrol 

although 



.»„■ = 




Georgia, 

Straits 





Motive crafl discharging cargo at one of the bunder*, or open wharves 



■ 



is the chief 

large amounts of kerosene 

and liquid fuel are also 

■ 

brought to Bombay. There 



be converted into two docks for accommodating small vessels, 

ween 4,000.000 and 5,000,000 tons of cargo are handled 




annually over the dock quays. Two open berths are reserved for 
certain classes of bulk cargo, but each of the others has its own en- 
closed transit shed, fully equipped with hydraulic cranes and hoists, 
chutes for discharge of cargo in 




and lock-ups for valuable 

The total floor area of the sheds is about 2,500,000 sq. ft. 







There are 209 movable hydraulic cranes in use at the docks. Those 



at the Prince's and Victoria Docks are of 30-cwt. lifting capacity, 
while the cranes at the Alexandra Dock are mostly of 35-cwt. 
capacity and of the luffing type, with a reach of 38 ft. from the quay 
wall. There are also several 5 -ton and 6-ton quay cranes, two fixed 



are separate depots for these different oils, and they have a total 




of about 56,000,000 gallons. 










storage 

Bombay is also an important passenger port. About 250,000 over- 
seas passengers pass through it in a year, and the coastal and ferry 
services carry more than 1.000,000 people in the same period. I 
of the ocean passenger traffic is dealt with at Ballard I *ier, a 1 ,500-ft. 
extension of the harbour wall at Alexandra Dock. A large two-storey 
building facing the berth includes a reception hall, Customs examina- 
tion hall, and a railway concourse linked with the adjoining railway 
station. This station is shown in the upper illustration on this page. 
It has four covered platforms from which special "through" trains 
run to Calcutta, Delhi, Peshawar, and other important Indian centres. 



220 




MECCANO 




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300 Vari 



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FASCINATING COLI 



POSTAL SET 



ROBOT TRAFFIC 

SIGNAL 



One of the most fascinating oi all hobbies 



->j 



i n 



*-**» 



arming mini 



unique 



THUNDERBOLT 11 SPEED CAR 



C\ 






\ 



Recent!/ many additions have been 
range now available, including more than 



interest every hoy 



Many 



Dinky Toys are 



touch 



splcic 



Hornby Railway LayoulS;^ vh 



Signals, Road Signs, Motor Vehicles, ar 



use 



making 





vessel 



■ 



Dinky Toys No. 23m 
A (in© seal© modal of ih© car in which Capt, G, E. T 
Eyslon set up a world land speed record of 3T2 m.p.h. 

at Bonneville, Utah, U.S.A., in 1937, 



12c 




road sc« 

foreign liners, 

een Mary/* an 

used 



can 



L„, 



model doc 



Price If- 






=r. 



PAVEMENT SET 






L 



The contents of 
12 fa strips of 



corners. 



Dink/ Toys No. 46 
this" set are four 3 in*, si* 6 in. and lour 

and four quarrel discs lor 
Price of complete set 6d, 






DOUGLAS D.C.3 AIR LINER 

Dinky Toys No. 60r 
A scat© model of a Douglas 
D.C3 air liner, a type in 
regular service on Amert* 
can and European routes. 

Price Bd* each 



EMPIRE FLYING BOATS 



Dinky Toys No. 47a 

ft* W 1 

(Four face} 
Price 3d P etch 
No, 47b (Three face 

Price 3d. each 
No, 47c (Two facol 
Right-angle or back- to- 
back. Price 3d. each 

BEACON 



«?*^* 



Unlimited fun can 






miniatures either on the table 



- wM 



some 



them 






/ 



Mb 

Dinky Toys No 
No. f2a Pillar Box, G.P.O. ,., 
No. 12b „ ., Apr Mail 
No. 12c Telephone Call Box 
No. 12d Telegraph Messenger 

No 12e Postman 

No. 34b Roval Mail Van 



■ »f 



m + * 



»44 



* ■ 



4 *# 



• + * 



■ * 



»4 * 



4#» 






#*» 



each 



ittng race games can be 

boy and 

collecting 

the toys can be pmchas 



may 
plete sets. 



obtai 






•** 



**V 



#*■ 



* * 



« »« 



Price of complete sst 



ROYAL AIR MAIL SERVICE CAR 



your 

Hornby dealer 

giving 
the complete ra 
Dinky Toys, 




your 



complete 



you 






Dinky Toys No, 34a 

In correct colours and 

fitted with detachable 
rubber tyres. 

Price 6d. each 



ODUi 



*TU 



MECCAN 



.- 



Dinky Toys No. 47d 
Realistic model of the 
Selisha Safety Beacon. 

Price 1d, each 



AIRSPEED "ENVOY" MONOPLANE 



llflrMTCD 



€RPO 



R.A.C. BOX. MOTOR CYCLE PATROL AND 

GUIDES 



Dinky Toys No. 60r 
Scafe models of the latest Imperial Airways Flying Boats. 
Twelve models available named: "iJalcdonia," 
"Canopus." "Corsair," "Challenger," "Centurion." 
"Cambria," "Calpumia," "Ceres." "Clio." 
"Cahpsa," "Corinna" and "Cheviot." Price 1f- 



ATLANTIC FLYING BOAT 

Dinky Toys No. 60* 
Similar in type to the Empire Flying Boat, Assorted colours 

Price T/- each 

AEROPLANES. 



Dinky Toys No. 62m 
Scale Model of the Airspeed *Envoy r * twin- 
engined commercial monoplane. Assorted 
colours* 






ane. 

Price 6d* each 






THE KING'S AEROPLANE 

Toys No. 62k 
Scale model of the Airspeed "Envoy' 
supplied to -.the Air Council for the King's Flight 

Price fld, each 









BEFUELLING TENDER 



■ ■ 

Dinky Toys No. 43 
This set is representative of fhe familiar personnel and 
rood box of the R.A.C Each item is finished in correct 



»■» 



#•# 



*■» 



colours. 

No. 43a R.A.C Box 
No^43fa RA'C. Moror Cycle Patrol 
No. 43c R.A.C. Guide directing traffic 
No, 43d RAC Guide af the salute 

Price of complete set 1J9 



#•# 



• »• 



■ ■ * 



each 6d. 

.. 9d. 
M 3d. 

m 3d* 



Dinky Toys No. 60y 
Realistic model of Thompson 
Bros. Tender used for tefue 1 
roplanes at aerodromes. 
Price 8tf. «ach 












ARMSTRONG WHITWQRTH 
'WHITLEY" BOMBER 



FLYING BOAT "CLIPPER III 



-#-* 



THREE-WHEEL 

DELIVERY VJ 



Dinky Toys No. 60z 
The set consists of six models of famous French aeroplanes 
Breguef-Corsaire low wing monoplane, Dewoitine 500 and 









"Arc-en <fel." Potez 58,Hamiot HI6DT, 
Cierva Autogiro. (Mads in the Meccano 

Price 3/- 



MONOPLANE "ARC-EN-C1EL" Dinky Toys No, 60a* 
A Scale rncdel of the famous French triple-engmed monoplane ■*Arc-en<teL #l (Made in 

Meccano Factory in Paris) Price 9d. each 



. 






Dinky Toys No. 60v 

Scale model of the "Whitley" 

long -range heavy bomber 

adopted by the R.A.F. 

Price 9d. each 






Dinky Toys No 60w 
Scale model of the Pan American Airways 
flying boat that took part in the transatlantic 

experimental flights in 1937, 

Price 1[- each 






Dinky Toys No. 

Fined with openir 
Price 10d. ei 

(Made in the Meccan 

in Paris] 



— 



fr B 



- 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 







1 




v. 








Varieties 

COLLECTING HOBBY 



■■■ 



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i 



-.*-w 



mj 



R.A.F. AEROPLANES 



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lobbies is that of Dinky Toys collecting 







colouring 

to the series. 




ion 



Imish. 



the spfen 
300 models, there are items that will 








useful 
others, such 



adding finishin 




..., 



Traffic 



Petrol Pumps, are 



idea 



*oad scenes There are also reproduo 



*■ 






liners, including Britain's wonder 



famous ships of 



British 



used with realistic effect 



be had in playing with these 

s table or on the 











can be devised. 



Sports Cars 



Dinky Toys No. 61 

No. 60h "Singapore" Flying Boat ... 
No. <i0n Fairey "Battle" Bomber {2)„. 

No. 60p Gfoster "ClatJialo!" Biplane 12} 

Price of complelo set 2/9 



* • * 



*■• 



each 1 '- 

« 4id. 

ip 6d. 



should start 




purchased separately, 



obtained 



com 



MEDIUM BOMBER 

Dinky Toys No 60s 
Similar to Fairey "Battle" Bomber (No. 60n), bur with new 
Air Ministry Shadow Shading. Price 6ri. each 






3ur 



and 



BATTLESHIP * DUNKERQUE' 

Dinky Toys No. 53ai 






?aler for a 

details 

plete range 






■■■ 



J * 



JJ 



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9 - 



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■.".' 



STREAMLINE SALOON 



» 



DIESEL RAIL CAR 



■ 



Dinky Toys No, 22h 
Assorted colours Fined with 
detachable rubbef lyres. 

Price 4d. each 






MOTOR TRUCK 



Dinky Toys No, 26i 
model of a modern 



Diesel- 






Price 5d, each 



engmed rail car 

{Made in the Meccano Factory in Paris} 

■ 






^lT 



LsfV 



' 



. - - 



RAILWAY SIGNALS 



Dinky Toys No. 
Assorted colours. 

Fitted with detachable 

rubber tyres. 

Price Bd. each 



-t 



i 



fth 



I5b 



Scale model of the French 26300 ton Battleship- "DunkerqueS* which has an overall length of 702 ft. 
9 in*, and a main armament of eight 13 in. guns. 



GARAGE 



(Made in the Meccano Factory in Paris] 



Price fld. each 



Dinky Toys No. 15 
No. 15a Single Arm Signals ("Home" and "Distant 11 ) each 2d. 
No, 15b Double Arm Signals (two in set) *„ .„ „ 3d. 

No. 15c Junction Serials ['Home" and "Distant") 4d« 

Price of complete sol 1/6 



i. 



'm&- 



■■* 



ROYAL TANK CORPS MEDIUM TANK SET 



I 



-\ 



* 1 






■■•■ 






" 






■. ■. •. 



<1 



i 



' 



■■■. ' 



■. ■. ' 



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Wt' 



J 



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»5Ja 



ISId 



!50d 



151c 



151b 






ENDER 



Fm*?d 



Dinky Toys No, 45 
With opening doubfe doors. Will accommodate 

any two Dinky Toys Motor Cars. 

Price 1/3 each 






tons, 



RAILWAY MECHANICAL HORSE AND TRAILER VAN 



No, 151a Medium Tank {1 

90 h.p.) ,. 
No. 151b Three - ton Transport 



Dinky Toys No. 151 



... each 1 # 6 



Wagon 



»# ■ 



r« * 



No. 151c Cooker Trailer with 

jack stand .« 

.No. 15ld Water Tank Trailer 
No. 150d Driver ... 



h 7d. 

6d. 



SIX WHEELED WAGON 



Price of complete set 3*11 






DOUBLE DECKER BUS 



• 



txPKt s$ Parcels 



TAXI WITH DRIVER 



- 






"vj 



.^J 



•A 






DDNLOP tyres 



it" 



drome* 






No, 33 Ra 
No. 33 Rd 



Dinky Toys No. 33R 
Filled with detachable rubber tyres. 
Railway Mechanical Horse 
Trailer Van 



•■* 



«»t 



•** 



E-WHEELED 

IVERY VAN 



Price, complete, L.M.S.R.. L.N.E.R.. 

G.W.R. or S.R ... 1/6 






■"T 



^ 



' 



\ 



ft 



Dinky Toys 

interesting model of a modern three-ton 
wagon, in assorted colours. 

Price 1/- each 



Dinky Toys No. 36g 
Fiired with detachable rubber lyres. 

Price lid* each. 



Assorted 



Dinky Toys No 29c 
colours. Fitted with detachable 
rubber tyres. 

Price 1f- each 



STREAMLINE DIESEL ARTICULATED TRAIN 



* Toys No. J4i 
*\\h opening lid 

W 101 © 

he Meccano Factory 

in Paris) 






*ul" 



— 






. 



Toys No 



Price 1/6 each 






II 



(Made in the Meccano Factory in Paris) 










THE 




MAGAZINE 







"Look and Find Out 



ti 



M 




By W. P. Westjvl^ FX.S., and Kate Hakvky, M.Sc. 

(Macniillan. Six volumes, 2/6 cacb) 

The six volumes of 






The Secrets of Trick 

Bv A. R. Croy 

(Sands, Hunter and Co. Ltd. 7/6 net) 



r 







life. They are in- 
irls who wish to 




excellent 
nature series deal with various aspects 

of animal and plant 

tended for boys and 

find out for themselves the most interesting 

things about the plants and animals 

see around them. They do this 

largely from pictures and 

and 
for 



When amateur photographers acquire 
experience and skill in the use of their 





r become interested in the 



■ 



deeper secrets of photographic practice 




who have reached this 



stage 



will 



welcome Mr. Croy's book, wluch will open 




ing, smoke rin 






elusive subjects as 

and sunbeams, the production of pen and 

drawings from photographs, 
printing on silk are dealt with, and there are 
many tricks of lighting, relief, shading and 

masking of special value in advertising and 











the volumes form valuable guides 

md creatures 






or 



plant 
woods, in ponds and 

in the 





The 



two volumes deal 

and wild flowers. The 





tree 

described are well illustrated, and 
their flowers and fruits, and their 

appearances in summer and winter, 
are fully described and explained. 
The volume on wild flowers is equally 



attractive 



and 



com 







It 









groups its subjects together according 
to the kind of situation in which A 
they are found, and traces the unfold- 
ing of their leaves and flowers month 

by month. 

Birds are dealt with in the third volume, 
and pond life and butterflies and moths 
are the subjects of the two following it. 
Each of these covers the ground well, and 
opens up many delightful secrets of nature 
that to many readers will be unsuspected. 

The sixth volume is particularly in- 
teresting. Its subject is the wild life of 

tells the stories of a 

series of interesting creatures from squirrels 
and hedgehogs to birds and tiny insects, 




commercial photography. The tricks de 

scribed are of great interest in themselves, 

and to be able to carry them out well is to be 

a master of the photographic art. This 

splendid book will be an excellent guide 

to those who aim at such a distinction. 

"Civil Engineering To-day'* 



By Edward Crrssy 

(Ox fori University Pn-sh. 3/6 u<-l) 






A 



civil engineer originally was 



simply one whose work had no con- 
nection with warfare and fortifications. 
The wonderful advance of engineering 
of all kinds led to further distinctions. 



and to-dav the civil engineer is the man 



barn owl stretching its wings. The illustrations on this page are 
from Book VI of "Look and Find Out," 



who designs and constructs great 



bridges, docks and harbours, builds 

dams and reservoirs, bores tunnels and 
makes canals. He is indeed the maker of 







* reviewed on this page. 

to them a new world of ideas, methods and 

few of which are described in 

ordinary books on photography. The book 
is not confined to mere tricks, however, as 
its title implies, for it not only shows how 
the camera can be made to lie, but also 

explains many ways of making attractive 
pictures and of treating them in order to 



modern civilisation, and such a book 



provide 





A double page is 










distinguishing between 
of the gardener. In addition it describes 
the many wild flowers that persist in 

in gardens, where they are 

looked upon as weeds. 

Each volume is illustrated by many 
reproductions of interesting photographs, 
together with drawings and picture tables 
designed to help in the recognition of 

living things dealt with. 




'Patents for Inventions 



»» 




rice 



By R. H addas, (Pitman, 3/6 net) 

book is described as a concise 
for inventors and patentees. It 
is written by an experienced patent 
agent, who knows from his own prac- 

that guidance is required through 
the intricacies of patent law. The author 
has set down in brief but adequate 
exactly what a patent is, and how pro- 
ceedings should be taken to obtain one 
and maintain it. Full details are given 
of every step, together with the stamp 

and other charges. 

1 





as this by "Mr, Cressy shows in striking 
manner to what extent we depend on him. 
It gives full accounts of magnificent works 
of all kinds, and provides a feast of know- 
ledge that will appeal particularly to 

readers of the "M.M." 

At the outset Mr. Cressy explains con- 
cisely and simply the wide range of work 
for which the civil engineer is responsible, 

and tells his readers something of the 

general methods they use. Then he turns to 
the construction of bridges, showing how 

the engineer designs his structures and how 
he sets about building them. A special 
chapter is devoted to accounts of the 
wonderful bridges of recent years, including 
the magnificent structures spanning Sydney 
Harbour in Australia, and the Golden 
Gate and San Francisco Bay in America. 



Underground work comes next. This is a 



particularly 
engineering, 





of civil 
the skill of the engineers 



The grey 




an introduction from America Id at 



d uties to be 




The 




of the book includes 




in Dominions and Colonies and in foreign 

trade 

read ers 



countries, and the 
marks and designs; 





H larger than its red English cousin. 

to each trick. On one 





a practical interest, in invention 
will find in it exactly the information 

and advice they need. 



is a 
concise but adequate account of the 

methods to be followed to produce certain 
effects, and on the other a magnificent 
example of work of the kind described. 

tricks are dealt with. 

■ 

They include "freak" effects such as double 

exposures and the introduction into scenes 

of figures photographed separately on a 
different scale. How to photograph such 



100 



concerned is well illustrated by an excellent 
account of Queen sway, the great road 
tunnel under the Mersey at Liverpool. 

sections on 

a 

the construction of canals, such as the 
Panama and Welland Canals, and the pro- 

ours. An account of the 










vision of 

construction of dams then leads naturally to 
the stories of the great hydro-electric power 
plants. These have been prominent 
of recent engineering, particularly in the 

States, and the details given of 
Boulder Dam. The Grand Coulee Dam and 
others erected there give a gootl idea of the 
stupendous nature of engineering w 





The provision of adequate supplies of 

irrigation of deserts and the 

recovery of land from the sea are the re- 



w 






with, and the 
engineer's 




maining subjects 
accounts given of 

to accomplish these aims complete a 
fascinating story. There are 38 well-chosen 
photographs and 57 drawings. 



. 











MAGAZINE 



223 




"Hard Liberty" 

By Fred Blakelev. (Harntp. 10/6 net) 

Stories of pioneers in remote 
undeveloped parts of the Earth are always 
attractive, and this account of the Aus- 
tralian wilds is no exception. Mr. Blake 

i was one 






*. 




men who 
crossed Central Australia 
from south to north on 

■ 

bicycles 30 years ago. Before 

a 




t* 



Indoor Model Railways 

_ _ _ . »._- . ._» _ 



i$ 



By E. VV. Twisikg. (Newnes. 5/-) 

The author of this book is well known in 




model-making 




and in the foreword 



to the book is described as one of the most 

versatile engineers and model makers in 






useful suggestions. Automatic 
track, layout planning, signallingand rolling 
stock come in for a full share of attention, 
and there»are particularly valuable hints on 
srenii.M-ffectsand tlu- luefltodsand materials 



* 





that time he had 
miner in various distric 
iome of i hem in very remote 
quarters. Of his experiences 
in these circumstances 
he writes interestingly and 

sincerely, and gives many 
wonderful pictures of rough 
but enjoyable life in a diffi- 
cult country, 
Mr. Blakeley 







run 



and at 




away from 









was 



own claim in 



He was big 

in spite of 



the opal 
and strong, 

his youth held his own well 
among the rough 
but 

with whom he mixed. He 
moved about from one min- 
ing district to another, and 
then the desire to wander 



straightforward 



men 



■ 



farther afield seized him. 
With two 








companions 
off on the long trail for Port 
Darwin in the fax North- 
There was a fourth member 

of the party, who indeed proved to be one 




to employ in obtaining them. Here Mr. 

Twining is at his best, for in 
this sphere he is an acknow- 
ledged expert. The book 
concludes with a chapter on 

architectural features gener- 
ally, in which are pointed 

out some of the pitfalls for 



the 



unwary in the 




struction of model buildings. 
' ~lw door Model M a Uways ' * 



wi ) 1 





to 



railway owners of the more 
advanced kind who specialise 
largely in the construction of 

own models. Although 




the book deals primarily 

with the HO and OO gauges 



it can be read with profit by 
miniature railway enthusi- 
asts whose interests are not 
confined to the smaller s 

There are more than 

illustrations, mostly valu- 
able scale drawings, but in- 
cluding also half-tone illus- 
trations of model railway 
subjects. 




<« 



The three men whose crossing of Central Australia on bicycles is described in "Hard Liberty," reviewed 

on this page. Mr. Fred Blakeley, the author, is on the left and alongside him is Jethro, the dog who 

made the 2,200-mile journey to Port Darwin with the adventurers. 



Learn to Drive" 

By Oliver Stewart 
(Pitman. 2/- net) 

Those who set out to be- 



of the most 




an 




certainly the 



one who attracted most notice among the 
many people who greeted the adventurers 
on their way north and on their arrival. 



the country. This is well 

of the book itself, 





by 
is 

devoted to small-scale model railways 
of HO and OO gauge. 



This was Jethro, a dog of uncertain breed 

~ greatest vice was killing goats. 









Jethro had no difficulty in keeping pace 

with his human companions, and survived 

might well have been 

expected to end the career of 
any normal dog. 

Many adventures befell the 
party on their 2,200 -mile 

accom- 

m x l h months. They 



To begin with Mr. Twining explains how 

miniature railways of these small scales 
came into existence, and discusses the 



relative merits of the 3.5 mm. scale, or 1 IO 
gauge, and the 4 mm. scale, or OO gauge. 

is followed by a section on electric 




come drivers could have no better guide 
than Mr, Stewart, whose expressed aim is to 
help people to learn to drive a motor car in 

the least possible time with the greatest 

, and with the least possible 
strain. In this he 






journey, 






9 



almost came to grief when 

crossing the treacherous salt 



bed 



of Lake 



Eyre, 



and 




struggled almost in vain to 
overcome difficulties present- 
ed by the shifting sand dunes 

On 
en- 

countered natives, including 
the dreaded "Might Tribes" of 
the interior who one night 



Central Australia, 
several occasions 




examined their camp without 

disturbing even Jethro. These 
mysterious beings were gener- 

hostile. They moved 

by night, killing 

and were 











scaling cattle, 
seen or 



white men. Then 





ad- 




succeeded admirably. 
He writes concisely but fully on every topic 
connected with his subject, and makes good 
use of an excellent series of diagrams 

designed to give information in rapid and 

certain manner. His book will 

■ 

be valuable to many who think 

know how to 




they 

drive, as well as to the learner. 



M 



r. Stewart 




starts 



on 



with the car, insisting 
learners mastering the controls 

in the 




driving 




going on 



to the road. Only when they 

are sufficiently practised in all 
the movements, and under- 



stand what each doe 



are 



they shown how to start awav 



from rest, 




to chan ge 



speeds up and down and how 
to reverse. Sound methods are 

encouraged throughout the 

section dealing with ordinary 
running and manoeuvring, so 
that the driver will do the best 

thing automatically when 

some unusual circumstance or 
emergency occurs. The re- 






venturous cyclists made the 

of the dreaded 




A model of an old-time locomotive in realistic surroundings. It represents a G.W.R. 4-4-0 
saddle tank of the Broad Gauge period. From "Indoor Model Railways," reviewed on this page. 



niaming 
to do 




show what 

a car skids, how 






I 



crocodiles that haunt streams and pools in 
the north, and many tales are told of the 

unusual birds and other creatures met 

with on the journey. 

Throughout the story readers have their 
fill of adventure generally, for the author in- 



*. 



motors for miniature engines, and then 
comes a particularly interesting talk, illus- 
trated by a valuable series of scale drawings, 

on locomotives old and new that are suitable 



for 





details of 





before and after railway grouping. 



uces many 



exciting 



reminiscences of 



The author 




turns to 






r days of hairbreadth escapes from death 
starvation and at the hands of natives. 
The book is well illustrated by means of 
25 reproductions of photographs. 



miniature work. He deals first with motor 






mechanisms and their adaption to models 
of a variety of engines, and his experience 
enables him to make a number of very 



to drive with good manners at 
night and in traffic, and with an adequate 
margin of safety. Good 

the 



on 



that marks 




advice is given 



ment 

really 



strained driver, and 





con- 



glossary 



of terms completes a very valuable little 
book,- There are three full page half- 
tone illustrations in addition to the 
many useful diagrams already referred 
to, all of which will play a part in helping 
readers to become good drivers. 



224 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 







pages are reserved for articles from our readers. Contributions not exceeding 
500 words in length are invited on any subject of which the writer has special hnowl&lge 
or experience 'these should he written neaily on one side of the paper only, and sfiould 

Loading Bananas 

During a recent voyage to Brazil on a 12,000-ton fruit 
vessel, we put in at a small place 
called Sao Sebastiao to pick up a 

s 




A rl ides 
as being 



w 

The Southwold Railway 



The Southwold 





ananas. Sao Sebastiao 

and 






anchor some little 
distance from the shore, 
cargo was brought out to us 
in big barges towed by a power 



ful 









g. 



and the 




bunches were transferred to our 
holds by means of a conveyor. 

conveyor was brought 
from the mainland on a special 
barge and hoisted on board by 
the ship's derricks. It consisted 
of an iron frame, about 30 ft. 




with a large roll of canvas 
belting at each end. These rolls 
were let down, and by means of 
an ingenious arrangement of rollers their lengths were so 
adjusted that one end just reached the barge, whilst the 
other hung down into the hold. The belting was double, 

Its 




a line in Suffolk that is now 

■ ■ *■ 

derelict, was opened in 1879 to 
connect Southwold with Hales- 



w 




i 



, a distance of just under 

nine miles. The gauge was 3 ft., 
and there were three stations 
on the line in addition to the 




termini. 
The line was clo 






S 




in 1929 






50 years after its opening. Since 
then it has become overgrown in 
many places with grass, heather 





and bracken, and sev 

have fallen across the rails. The 

bordering fences are broken and 



the stations are in a 




of 









senn-r 





A conveyor loading bananas from barge to ship at Sao Sebastiao, a small 
Island off the coast of Brazil. Photograph by A. C. Gee, Southend-on-Sea. 



Much of the rolling 

formerly used on the railway 

be seen at Halesworth, 



can 






near the L.N.E.R. station. The long and probably costly 
bridge built at Walberswick to carry the line across the 
River Blyth still stands, and is supposed to be "swun 






ss 




eyor 



forming 

width was about 3 ft., and on one side 








were pouches in which the 
bunches of bananas were placed. In 

JL 

they were carried up to 
level, along the iron framework, and 

into the hold, where they were 

hand. 

counted the 
number of bunches loaded, 
sisted of a short lever, weig 
end, against which each 



removed and stored 

An 









at one 



in 





e wei 











pouch 
as was 




containing a bunch 
sufficient to depress the lever, 

the counting mechan- 

slipped by 
kind. 





ism, but an enint\ 
without any 



effect 

The conveyor was 






by a 

electric motor run from 

supply, and the 

in 




were 
time than would have been 

if 





had been placed in cradles 
hoisted aboard by the ship's winches. 

A. C. Gee (Southend-on-Sea). 






once a year, as the river for a mile or 

e the bridge is tidal. 
It seems a pity that the service has 
not been continued, even if it is 

economical to replace the engines. 

The use of motor coaches fitted with 

suitable wheels might have proved an 




admira ble 

■ ■ i 




ough 



which 




le country 
runs is very 



pleasing, and at one point there is a 
heronry within 100 yds. of the track. 
Since the line was closed a 




vice 



has 




maintained 




scr- 
een 



Southwold and Halesworth. 



The 



engineer engaged on 



the con- 



struction of the line was a Mr. W. G. 






Jackson, who drove the first passenger 
train on the Southwold 





Part of the track of the Southwold Railway, which was 
closed in 1929. Photograph by j. D. U. Ward, Oxford. 



this occasion the train had to negotiate 
floods caused by heavy rains. He had 
previously been engineer in charge of 
the construction of the first railway in 
China in 1875-6, and had actually 

the first train to run there on 

lai- 

. D. U. Ward 




the 






j 



J 






THE 





225 



A Fortnight in Holland 

I recently spent a most enjoyable holiday in Holland, 
and there saw many interesting scenes that are only to be 

found in "the land of 




Australia's Most Powerful Light 

Macquarie, Governor of New 




Wales 



b 






from 1810 to 1821, was responsible for the erection of the 

lighthouse in 




the windmill. 



* * 



I 





rom Lon- 






to Rotterdam 



H ar wi c h 



i nd 





e 



Hook of Holland, and 
spent a week 





mg 



Rotterdam 



>ior- 

and 



surrounding dis- 
tricts. 

As I am interested 

in ships I visited the 
yards of Van P. Smit 

the Rotterdam 




Co., where 
went over the 




4t Nieuw 
the largest ship ever 

in Holland, and 
Wiltons, at S 





Australia and it is 
named after him. For 



it he 




an ad 



v 




. 



«ereous 



b 




looking 




over- 
Pacific 
at the Outer 



the 



S ( i u t h 




■ * 



- m f 





Sydney, and 

he laid the foundation 

stone on 11th June, 
1816. The tower was 




net! 



by 



Gill, 




Acting 



Colonial Engineer, and 
Francis Greenawav. It 

■J 



wa 




76 ft. 



hig 




and 



the lantern was 277 ft. 







A scene in the cheese market at Alkmaar in Holland. Photograph by C. Rebbeck, Belfast. 




where the float in 

docks were of special interest. I also visited the recently 




completed Feyenoord Stadium, which seats 65,000 peo 

A day was spent on the Rhine in a Diesel- engined boat. 
~" " "on the river is very heavy, and 



The 



barm 



tra 





saw more activity in coal- handling than I had ever 

possible. There was coal coming down the river 




from Germany and 



general freight 




barge 




seldom being empty. 



oing up river, the 
[ timed one coal- handling 




ant with mv s 




-w 



r' 






was 





tance of 



was 








high, si lips 



above sea level. Its 
light could be seen 

from ships at a dis- 

22 miles. As the cost of maintaining it 

> -. i- ■ -- . ■ 



entering 



the harbour were taxed 



2d. a ton to keep it in operation. 



In 1879 the Marine 






Colonies decided to 
Tower, and to 




artment of the Australian 







ano 




the original Macquarie 



slig 




to the west. The 



Government granted £15,000 towards 




cost of the 




ouse 



to see the grab pick up seven tons of 






work, and the foundation stone of the new 

was laid on 2nd March, 1880. Hie building was completed 



c 




convey it from 




barge 



to ship, 



scharge 
45 sec 



it and return empty in 




In a very modern electric train I 

travelled to Amsterdam. There 

the yards of the Neder- 





I 

land Shipbuildin 

munici 




w 




roun 





vi si 





e 



at Schiphol, 
city's very 








ne 



Rijko museum. 
A day 



was 



spent motoring along 



the new enclosing dyke at the 





and also over large tracts of 
reclaimed land now under cultivation. 



The 

Alkmaar 




cheese market at 
me greatly, as 



did an old fishing village at Yolendam. 



I was surprised to find at Cruquis 
an old steam pumping engine built 



in Cornwall in 1849. I was 
that this remained 




in 



until 



1933! 



The 






regular 



use 



. . 



Hague 



proved 




attractive both as a 

stork interest and as a modern 






m 1S81, but did not come into 
until two years later. Its total cost 

was £19,620, nearly half of which was 
spent on the light itself. 



The 





uarie Tower is 



still in operation, and is shown in the 

lower illustration on this 

circ ular 

S7 ft. an 





. It is 

with a height of 
24 ft. in 




In January 1933 




the light was 



con- 



ma king it 



into one of 1,140,000 c.p 




Australia, and on a 
is visible at 



most powerful in 




night it 



a 




an c e 



of 

(50 miles. It is electric and 




over 
semi- 
being 



led on and automatically brought 



automatic, a second 



lamp 



into focus if 




one in use burns 



out. A bell rings in the keeper's house 
to warn him of any failure. 

taken from the 

separate generating machinery is pro- 





vid ed , 




is automatically switched 

if the 



city. 




u 





All the main roads I saw w 

good 




Lighthouse, Sydney, lis 1,140,000 candle- 
power light is the most powerful in Australia. Photograph 

by K. E. Allen, Oatlcy, N.S.W. 




with four lanes for traffic and separate 
lanes for cyclists. Before leaving, I visited the modern 

loven, in 

of 
television sets 




very 




CI 









the south of Holland, 
all kinds from glass blowing to 
were explained and demonstrated to me. Some 20,000 

are employed in these works, which cover many 

. Ri-um-XK 




acres. 








that event an acetylene 



on and connected to 

supply fails. 

down in the 

the lighthouse is allowed for. 




equipment in 



In 



come into 





would automatica 







ion. 



Lower down on the South Head, nearer the mouth of the 



harbour, stands another 




known 




the 

Hornby Light. This was constructed in 1858, under the 
supervision of Sir William T. Denison. The Hornby Light 
is smaller than the Macquarie Tower, and its light is much 

K.E.Allen (Qatley, N.S.W.). 




S 










MECCANO MAGAZINE 













nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 

a 
□ 

a 
a 
□ 
n 

□ 
□ 







and Trucks 




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MODERN factories and warehouses provide a variety 
of attractive subjects for the model-builder. Their 



efficient working depends largely on the ease and rapidity 



with which materials of all kind 



of a factory to another as 
employed for removing 




These are 



such as grain, 




s 



can 





be 



ar t M i ent 



a 



work, 






ances are used for 



an c 1 m 




of these 



possess features that make them 
line subjects for models. 

The most familiar transportation 
devices are the various types of 

conveyors, hoists and 

trucks, 
machines 




In 



addition 



there 



are 



designed 



for handling 
kinds of goods. Examples 
of all of these have been described 
and illustrated from time to 





in the "MM." so that readers 




w 




models of this 



to experiment 



with 




will have no 



difficulty in obtaining information 
to guide them. 

Conveyors are attractive sub- 



jects because Of their movement Fig. 1. A model of a manually 




and loading it into wagons or bins, and an example of a 

conveyor of this kind is 

The conveyor 





shown in Fig. 

works at an angle of about 45 deer. 



to the 
is lifted 





the material 



it by 



means 



of 



a 



mechanical scoop at the lower end. 
The trucks into which the material 
is to be loaded are run under the 
elevated end of the conveyor. 

It will be seen from the illus- 

constructional 




on 














are 




model as this 
simple. Although in this 
instance the conveyor is of the 
ordinary plain belt type it can 
be replaced 

■ 




a 






and variety. One of the best tvpes 
for modelling in Meccano consists 



operated hoist of the type used in 
workshops for lifting light castings and parts of machinery. 




i 



. 





carrying 

transporting 
Small Flanged 
representing 
suspended by 
travelling belt made 

Model-builders 
can attempt some of 

veyors, such as the 

power stations and 

coal from the storage 

that feed the furnaces. 

plates attached 

which hauls the plates 



chain 
or buckets, which are used for 
materials and small packeted 

Plates can be used for 

b e 




along 



a V-shaped 




the 





can 



Strips from an endless 
of Sprocket Chain. 

who possess a large Outfit 
the more elaborate 



or one of the scraper type, 
there is plenty of scope for in- 
teresting experiment. The model 

an Electric Motor, 

power unit of this type 

is not available a Clockwork Motor 

can be used quite successfully. 

Another interesting type of conveyor is that used for 




loading 
these 



or unloading bananas. 



An illustration of 




o 



f 




con 



scraper 



types 



used 



in 



gasworks 



for 







carrying 



to the chutes 










consist of scraper 
endless chain 



on page 224 of this issue. Other banana 
loaders were illustrated in the "MM" for June 1936, 
and the reproduction of these will offer some interesting 
problems to the keen model-builder, 

In warehouses where materials in sacks have to be 



handled an interesting appliance known as a 



i ■ 



bag 



stacker" is often employed. This is an ingenious machine 
equipped with mechanical jaws that grip the sacks one 
by one and 





in their 





in 



a neat stack. 



Model-builders who would like to try their skill in making 



a model of this kind should refer to the "MM. 



for 



i 






March 1936, on page 177 of 




illustration 




will find an 




details of an actual 



or rectangular 
metal trough. The 




is 
trough 




into the 

at one end, 



and is dragged 
by the 

reaches 



along 





mouth of 

delivery chute. In a model 

one of these devices 




scrapers can be built 







very useful trans- 
devices used in 




Plates and fitted to a 
Sprocket Chain. It is necessary to construct the 
trough in such a manner that no bolt heads 
inwards to obstruct the scrapers in their movement, and 

a 



Fig. 2. A detailed 

"Collis" commercial truck. 

It was built by J. J. Pienaar, Johannesburg. 



factories and 

louses are 

mechanically 
or electrically 

propelled 

various 

kinds. These are 

made in such a 






e 









provide ideal subjects 

Here 

tion, for illustrations and 




types 



variety 



of 




they 



and small Outfits. 

■ 

again there is no difficulty in obtaining informa- 

ions of such trucks 






overcome this 
In addition to the fixed types, there are various kinds 

le conveyors that can be moved from one 




in the "MM." 








models can be driven by a 




ic Motor and a 



very neat example of the use of this was illustrated on 



j 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



227 






page 174 of the "M.M" for March last. Where a sufficient 
stock of parts is available it would he 



interesting 



to 



build a similar m 







on a large scale, and to drive it 
by means of a 6- volt Electric Motor, which can be 
mounted on a Ball 
Bearing unit or a small 

Roller Bearing. A 6-volt 
accumulator can readily 
be mounted on a model 



a model of which is shown in 






Fig 



1. In this the chain 



drive is transferred to the hoisting wheel through worm 
and pinion gearing so that there is no danger of the load 



falling when the chain is released 




of this 




to supply 



current, and thus to 




it 




y 




con- 



tain et I . 

Fig. 2 shows a model 
of a well-known com- 

truck of a very 

Tliis 





consists 



.type. 



of 



a 



for 



m, 



mounted 



plat- 



on 



wheels, which can be 

from the ground 




a distance of several 



inches 



pressing 
which 




the 



de 



handle by 





As will be seen from 
illustration a very 

neat model of this can 
be 




Model -builders who 



possess an 



Electric 



Motor will find an 
electrically-operated 



hoist 



a 



good 



subject 



for their attention, as 
such models allow scope 





methods 



of 



control. 

this 



A 



model 





is shown in 




4. This is 




■ 



s 




on 



an 



actual 



Royce 



tr 




is 



Fig. 3. A novel working model of a portable conveyor-loader designed for loading loose material into 

trucks. Although simple to build it works in the same manner as its prototype. 




hauled. The goods to be moved are stacked on trays 

by runners, so that there is sufficient space 
between them and the ground to allow the truck to 

down- 
and 



be 



run 




er 






is then 
lifting 




ward and the platform rises, thus 

its load, and the latter is deposited on arrival in its new 

position by simply reversing the movement. It is not 

difficult to build a model of this truck, as the laising 

gear consists simply of an 

ment of levers and links 

builders who are interested will be 

able to obtain all the guidance they 

need on this point from Fi 

i 



hoist designed for lift- 
ing loads up to 5 tons, 

and it is very' simple to 
assemble and 

Two chains hang from 
one side of the hoist and these form the sole controls, 




raised by pullin 
on the other. 
Electric Motor is collected from an 



the pulley block 
and lowered 






one chain, 

for the 

conductor 

wire by a \" Pulley, fitted above the neat trolley. The 
Motor is covered by a casing of Flexible Plates. 




Sometimes electric hoists 





with 





there is room 






r ex per 




and 
in 



devising the best means of carrying 
out the movements. 

Interesting subjects for models 
of a very different type from those 
already mentioned are the hoists 
used for lifting castings and machine 
parts. The simplest kind is 

which con- 
sists usually of two chain wheels 

of different diameters and is sus- 






pended from a 
it can travel. 








along which 

sheave 
el 





ir 1 

of one chain 
which the hoisting hook is attached. 



The chain by which 




hoist 



is 




an endless one pa 
the large upper 






e 



■1 



then round the lower sheave and 



finally 



over 



the 



smaller 



upper 



wheel, the rest of the chain hanging 

down in a loop. The 




electro-magnets instead of ordinary lifting hooks. Hoists 

of this type are used in metal 

ards for lifting and 
plates, and 

seen 






houses, w 




are 



metal ware- 
to lift 




a heavy iron ball known as a "skull 
cracker. 1 ' This is dropped from a 




onto 



height of several 

metal to break it into pieces 

size suitable for the melting fur 




naces. A typical hoist of this kind 
was illustrated on the cover of the 
"M.Mr for May 1936, and this 
would make an ideal subject for an 
interesting and unusual model. The 

of the hoist itself is 
very similar to that of an ordinary 

mechanical 





, and no difficulty 
should be experienced in build in 
up a 

carry 



g 




c 




power to 



lifting operations. 







is 
"ing on the loose chain. 



Fig. 4. Electric hoists provide plenty of scope for variety in 
design and methods of control. The mode) shown above in- 




corporates a 




simply by 

Meccano Sprocket Chain and Sprocket Wheels are ideal 

for use in modelling such an appliance and the only 



reversing mechanism 



other parts required are a few Strips, Rods and Pulleys. 



Hoists of the 




described 






dis- 



advantages that when a load is raised it is maintained 
in position only by the friction on the spindles of the 

that it is suitable only for light loads. This 
overcome in another kind of manual hoist, 





For this purpose the Magnet Coils 

in the Elektron series of 
parts will prove useful, and by using 

two or more of these together a really 
powerful unit can be assembled. 

Meccano Bobbins (Part No. 181) 
wound with wire, also can be used. 

with goods elevators or 




Many factories are equip 
s. Model-builders with the necessary 



plenty to 





s will find 

them in constructing working models 

of this kind, as there is ample scope for introducing 

various automatic starting, stopping and safety devices. 

devices usually consist of catches fitted to the roof 

of the lift cage. If the hoisting cable breaks, the catches 
spring 




outward and jam the lift in its shaft. 







228 THE MECCANO 

nnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnn 



D 

a 

a 




D 
□ 

a 
a 
a 






By 



a 




aimer 



ff 









D 
□ 
□ 
□ 

□ 
□ 

□ 

□ 



nnnnnnnnnnDDnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnDannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 




(403) Synchronous Motor for Electric Clocks 

Mod el- builders who experiment in the construction of 
clocks will be interested in the synchronous motor shown in Fig. 

403. The special feature of a motor of 

this kind is that its speed depends on the 
frequency of the alternating current 

supplv to which its windings are connect- 

e for driving 




ed. 



It is therefore 



clock mechanisms. 

The motor is built from Meccano parts, 

with the addition of * 

and is not difficult to construct* 
Each side of the stator, or stationary part 






of the motor, consists of a 




ar Strip 1, 



and between these are eight Magnet Coils 
2, fitted with Magnet Cores. The Circular 



Strips 




clamped together by fastening 



the Circular Strip 




a Threaded Boss 3 between each pair of 

Magnet Coils, the Uoss bung spaced in mi 

means of four 
washers. The other Circular Strip is then 
assembled in position by screwing £* Bolts 
into the Threaded Bosses, 

The rotating part of the motor consists 
of a Hub Disc 6, around the rim of which 
are bolted 24 buffers 






7, removed from 





Spring Buffers (Part No. 120a). Each of 

the bufiers carries nine 

below its head and five on its shank, the whole being fixed to the 

Hub Disc by means of a nut. The bufiers form the poles of the rotor, 

and care should be taken to space them at equal distances apart 

around the rim of the Disc. A Bush Wheel is bolted at the centre 

of the Hub Disc and in its boss is fastened a 3|" Rod. The rotor is 

now ready to be fitted in the 

housing. 

Bearings for the rotor shaft 
are provided by two Face Plates 
8, each of which is sup 
by eight 3" Strips arranged in 
the manner shown. Two Collars 

secured on the rotor shaft 

ensure that the poles of the 
rotor are maintained in align- 




Interesting Screw Mechanisms . 

(W, Howard, Burnley, and L Cutts, Coldthorpcj 

W. Howard, Burnley, has submitted an interesting suggestion for 

a hoisting mechanism that can be used in 
model cranes as an alternative to the 
usual method of winding the hoisting cord 
around a driven drum. The mechanism he 

suggests is shown in model form in Fig. 
404. It is based on that used in hydraulic 
cranes, in which the hoisting 'cord is passed 
around a system of pulleys, one set of 



which are 




whil 



e another set is 



arranged on the end of the piston of a 
hydraulic ram, As the piston moves out- 
ward the two sets of pullevs move apart 

and thus draw in the hoisting cord, which 

is attached to the load. 



Howard 's 

- 

system of 








this 



very closely. The 

framework carrying it consists of two 

2V x 1 J* Flanged Plates, which are joined 

by 7 ^"Strips 
com 






Fig. 403 




mounted on a base 
Girders. Four 1 



Pulleys are. mounted on a 3* Rod 4 and 
are spaced by a Coupling and Washers. 
The pulleys on the movable set are 
mounted on 1* Rods fixed in the longi- 
tudinal bore of a Coupling 2. An 8 

Screwed Rod 3 passes through the threaded transverse bore of 
the Coupling, and is jour nailed at one end in a Rod Socket and at 

Plate. The other ends of 




other end in a 2^x1^ 









on 




ment 
Magnet 




the Cores of the 

■ 

. The J* 




9 serves as a grip to facilitate 
spinning the rotor when start- 
ing up the motor. 

The Magnet Coils are con- 
nected together in series, that 
is the inner terminal of each 
Coil is connected to the outer 
terminal of the next. When the 
last Coil is reached its 






terminal and that of the first 

by leads to the 
Terminals 4 and 5 bolted to 
the Circular Strip 1. As a 




adjustment, the Core of 
each Magnet Coil is moved as 
close to the poles of the rotor as 

" * without coming into 




actual contact with them. 



The motor 

from 



is designed to 



i ) f the 
Meccano TG seriesTransformers, 





V Rods are fixed in the bosses of Eye Pieces 1 
the 7 r Strips. 

A 1" loose Pulley 7 is fixed by lock-nuts to the end of the Screwed 
Rod and is connected by a Driving Band to the £* Pulley geared 
to the Electric 1! 



Cord 5 is tied at 6. It is passed first round 
a Pulley in the fixed block, then round a Pulley in the movable 
block, and so on, finally being passed over the Pulley at the jib- 
head. The effect of this arrangement is that a small movement 

movable pulley block results in a considerably larger 

of the load hook. For example, when the movable 

pulleys move through a distance of 3 in. along the Screwed R 

the load hook is raised through a distance of 24 in. 

me details of a screw mechanism 
jib of a model crane. An advantage 



of this system over the ordin- 
ary method is that it does 
away with luffing cords, which 



are liable to slip off the Pulleys 

and become entangled. His 
idea is to pivot 

halfway down the 




model and connect 
Rod of suitable length 
large Fork Piece that is pivoted 
to an Octagonal Coupling, The 
latter works on a horizontal 








Fig. 404 



and on a frequency of 50 cycles the rotor has a speed of 250 r.p.m. 
If the motor is required to work on frequencies other than 50 the 

speed of the rotor can be ascertained by multiplying the frequency 

* -- * •-'- ~ * rtrt - " " ,,? ~ ^ - — J --- by the 



of the mains su 




by 120 and dividing the 




spin 




rotor at a 




number of poles on the rotor. 

To start the motor it is necessary 

slightly higher than its normal working speed, and a little practice 
is all that is necessary to ensure a quick start-up. 



traverses the Rod, Another type of screw 



Screwed Rod that can be 
rotated by a Bush Wheel, or 

train coupled 
work or Electric 
Motor if the model is driven 
by this means. When the 
Screwed Rod is rotated, the 

jib is either raised or lowered 
as the Octagonal Coupling 



was described in 





estions Section" for December 






and 



consists of a lever, one end of which is connected by links to 
the jib while the other end is attached to a Coupling that tra- 



verses a Screwed Rod. 




the Screwed Rod is rotated the 



Coupling moves downward, and its motion is transmitted through 
the links to the jib. A feature of this system is that the pull is 

applied almost at right angles to the jib, irrespective of its position. 



4 



> 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



229 



(405) A Gearless Speed Reducing 

Mechanism (R. Simpson, Hull) 

R. Simpson, Hull, required a sim 
device for trans- 





Triangular Plate. The arms are 

lock -nutted in pairs to a 2* Strip, each of 

which carries a Coupling. The 5" Screwed 



Rod 3 passes through the centre plain 






a 




ve 



fro m on e shaft 



to 



another 



in 



such a manner 

that the d riven 

shaft would 

rotate always in 
the same direc- 
tion, no matter 

in which direc- 
tion the driving 

shaft were rotat- 



ing 



He 



also 



wished to make 






t he driven shaft 



rotate 



at 



one 



twentieth of the 
speed of the dri v- 

He 




mg 

solved the pro fa- 
de- 




vice 





of Coupling 1, 
but is prevented 
from moving 



longitudinally by 



two Collars. One 

end o f t he Sc rew- 
ed Rod is fitted 

with a handle 

consisting of two 

%" Bolts screwed 

into a Threaded 
Boss 4, which 

is held on the 



Rod 




a n u t 



The other end 

of the Screwed 
Rod works in 

cen 
verse threaded 







process is repeated with each Strip, until 
all are threaded to the Sprocket Chain. 
The other ends of the Strips are 
threaded similarly. It will be found quite 
easy to pass the Cord through the Sprocket 
Chain and Strips if a large darning needle 
is used for the purpose. The ends of the 

together 




Sprocket Chain are 

in the normal way, and 

of the Cord are tied together. 




free ends 



The band is carried on eight 1 J* Flanged 



Wheels, and is driven by means of Bush 
Wheels mounted on Rod 4. There are two 
Bush Wheels on this Rod and each carries 
eight bolts, the shanks of which are on 
the same side as the boss. The shanks 
of the bolts act as teeth and engage 




bolts of the 2i* Strips. The four centre 
Flanged Wheels are mounted on a bogie 
consisting of two 2k" Angle Girders bolted 
to a 2J*xli* Flexible Plate. The Flanged 
Wheels are fastened on 3* Rods jour nailed 



in the elongated holes of the Angle Girders. 






in 



Fig. 405 



bore of the 

Coupling 




•> 



The 




. 405, an interesting feature of which is 

that it does not incorporate any gears 
or pinions. 



The driving and driven 



shafts 1 and 2 



respectively are mounted in the positions 
shown, the former carrying a cam 5 formed 
from a Kemex Universal Stand Clamp 
(Part No. K31) and the latter a Ratchet 
Wheel. A 5£* Strip 3 is fitted at one end with 
a Pawl, which is carried on a Pivot Bolt 
and is tensioned by a short length of 

Spring Cord. The other end of the 5 A" Strip 
is held against the head of «a Pivot Bolt 



lock-nutted in the 




shown. The 



Strip is held in contact with the cam bv a 
second length of Spring Cord. It will be 
seen that for each revolution of the cam 5 
the Ratchet Wheel is advanced one tooth 
by the Pawl 4, the second Pawl being 
arranged to prevent the Ratchet Wheel 
from rotating in the reverse direction on 
the return stroke of the Pawl 4. 



This device is 




suitable for 



o 




used 




feed mechanisms, and can be 



in clock gear 



i 




It should be 



noted that other ratios than 20 : 1 can be 
obtained by suitable arrangement of the 5 V 



Strip and cam, and by 
Ratchet Wheel with 

a Sprocket Wheel of 

suitable diameter. 




the 



clamp 

is set up as shown, and is tensioned by 
rotating the Screwed Rod. The pivoted 
joints make the clamp suitable for 





use 



with either oblong or square frames. 



A 4* Rod 5 passes through the centre 
holes of the Angle Girders and is journalled 
in the 5 k" Strips as shown. 

To mount the tracks in a model 
Rods are journalled in the base or chassis 
of the model and on them are fastened 
the front and rear pairs of Flanged Wheels. 
In some cases the bogie can be pivoted 







Cre 




Track for 
Model Excavators 

(J, Wilson. Milford-on-Sea) 

Many types of ex- 
cavating machines and 



tractors, 



arm 







well as 

are mount- 






ed on creeper tracks, 

and in building models 
of these machines the 
problem arises as to the 
best means of making 



satisfactory creepers 




as few 




a: 



possible. Several 

methods of construct- 
ing creepers have been described from 




time to time on these 
month I am giving 




and 




,j 




n id hud that is 







(406) A Usefu 

Woodworker's 



Cla 



mp 



(J. Usher, Dundee) 



From 



time 



to 



time I have describ- 
ed in 




Section" 



several 



tools and miscel- 
laneous gadgets that 



can be put to prac- 




tical use in 
home workshop. A 

further addition to 
this series is the 
woodworker's 
tu re-framing 
shown in Fig 





forward by J. Wilson, 
Milford-on-Sea. A 

■ 

track built 

the lines 

by Wilson is shown 

in Fig. 407. It is 




Fig. 407 

to the chassis, and the 5|* Strips can then 
be dispensed with. 



The 




illustrated is intended for 



■ 



constructed 

short 




from 
and 

Sprocket Chain, and 
rides quite freely 
over ground irregu- 



larities 



The flexible belt 

8 2\ 




consists ot 



n 



.'.' 



Fig. 406 



Strips, each of which 
is i itted with two 
bo Its 1 . T he nuts on 
the shanks of the 
bolts are tightened 
up with sides paral- 
lel to the edges of 
the Strip. The Strips 
are then laid side 
by side, touching 



This was designed bv f . Usher, Dundee, and 



is a 




tool for small work. 



The device consists of four arms com- 
posed of 5JT Strips, to one end of each of 
which is lock-nutted a 2*" Triangular 
Plate. Two H* Angle Girders at right 
angles to each other are bolted to each 





upwards, and a 




each other, with the 

of Sprocket 
Chain 2 is laid over the end holes of the 
Strips. Cord 3 is then threaded through 

hole in 




them. It is passed through 

the first Strip, ' round one of the links 



in the Sprocket 




in, and then 




through 



the hole in the same Strip. This 



use with shafts 5 in. apart, but tracks of 
any length, can be built if desired. The 
width of the track also can be varied 
and if Ik" Strips are used, it is necessary 
to fix a bolt only in the centre hole of 
each Strip. The Cord is threaded through 
the end holes of the Strips as before. 



Miscellaneous Suggestions 



Under this heading " Spanner" replies to readers 
who submit interesting suggestions regarding new 
Meccano models or movt ntents that he is unable to 
deal with more fully elsewhere. On occasion he offers 
comments and technical criticisms that, he trusts, will 
be accepted in the same spirit of mutual help in which 
thev are advanced. 

(M.203.) The Helical Gears (Parts Nos. 
211a and 211b) are designed for use in all 
kinds of mechanisms where it is required to 
transmit a reversible right-angle drive 
from one shaft to another when the two 






are not in line. J. Walsh, Cardiff, suggests 
that the adaptability of these parts for 
other purposes could be greatly increased 
by drilling holes in the 1 J* Helical Gear in 
similar positions to those in the 1 J* Bevel 
Gear or Bush Wheel. The part could then 
be used in much the same way as the 1 V 

Bevel Gear is used in differentials and other 



mechanisms. The suggestion is one that will 



be given careful consideration. 






230 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 









Subjects for Large and 





□□□DC! 

□ 

a 
a 
a 
□ 
a 

□ 



nnnnnnnnnnnannannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnann 





HE 



n 



Fig. 1. A modeJ steam tug built from Outfit No. 1. 

to construct. They include a 
scooter and a steam tug, built from the 

contents of Outfits Nos. O and 1 



five 
e w 
m o d e 1 s 

described 
this month 
differ so 
widely in 
type and size 
that every 
Meccano 
model- 

builder, 

whatever his 
Outfit, will 

find one or 
more that he 

will be de- 




forward end of the Boiler, is built up by bending a 5|*xl|* 
Flexible Plate to form a square tube, and fastening it to the base 
plate by a \\" x J* Double Angle Strip. The top of the tank consists 
of two overlapping 2|*x \\" Flexible Plates. 

The supports for the crankshaft are provided by two 2\" Strips, 
bolted to the sides of the Boiler, the lower ends of the Strips bein 
curved slisrhtly to conform with the contour of the Boiler. Each 

by 



cr 





web of the crank consists of two Collars. These are 
unscrewing the Gnib Screw of one of them so that it projects about 
'* and screwing the second Collar over the projecting portion. A 1* 
Rod is used for the crank pin. One of the webs is fastened on the end 
of a 1 ¥ Rod and the other on the end of a f * Bolt, both the Rod and 
the Bolt being journalled in the upper holes of the 2| 




^ The "big end" is formed by a large Fork Piece fitted on the crank 
pin. A 1 \" Rod is locked in the boss of the Fork Piece to form the 
connecting rod, and to its free end a 2" Rod is pivotal ly secured by 
two Rod and Strip Connectors. The 2* Rod represents the piston 

rod, and it slides in a cylinder consisting 




, Then comes a trench 
digger that is capable of real work, and 
for which Outfit No. 4 is required. 
Finally the needs of owners of 



larg 



Outfits are met with fine working models 
of a horizontal steam engine and a 
swing bridge, each of which can be built 

contents of Outfit No. 7. 




fro m 

The steam tug shown in Fig. I is the 
first model to be described. This is very 
effective and it is very easy to assemble. 
Construction is commenced with the 
hull, which consists of two 5V Strips 1 
joined at the bows by an Angle Bracket 
and at the stern by a second 5k" Strip 2. 

A 2£*x£* Double Angle Strip is then 

fixed in place by the bolt 5. The deck is a 
5£* x 1 r Flexible Plate, extended at the 
front by a Flat Trunnion, and it is held 
in place by a 1* Pulley and a Spring 




fixed 



on the 3J* Rod 




ng the 



mast. The sides are made to slope up- 
ward at the bows by the use at each side 

of a 5£* Strip and a 4V strip made from 

two 2 $" Strips. The Strips are joined at 
the bows by an Angle Bracket. 

The deck cabin is formed with two 
Trunnions, which are joined together by 




of a Sleeve Piece, which is 





to 



e top of the fire-box by a V Bolt, but 




spaced from it by six washers. A J 

Wheel is pressed on each end 
of the Sleeve Piece. 

The valve chest is a Coupling, which is 
bolted to the side of the cylinder, and 
carries a 2" Rod that is connected by a 
3 A* Strip and an Angle Bracket to a 
Collar on the end of the crankshaft. To 
make the centrifugal governor two bolts 
are screwed into the tapped holes of a 
Collar, which is mounted on the upper 
end of a 1^" Rod journalled in a Double 
Bracket. The Double Bracket is support- 
ed by a 1 \" Strip and an Obtuse Angle 
Bracket from the top of the fire-box. At 
its lower end the l|* Rod carries a 
Pulley, which is connected by a Driving 
Band to the 




* 







Fig, 2. A model overtype stationary steam engine and boiler, which 

forms an unusual subject for Outfit No. 7. 




a Flat Trunnion and a 2J*x|* Double Angle Strip. The bolt that 
holds the funnel is §" long, and it passes through four Angle Brackets, 

each of which is fitted with a Flat Bracket 5. The 2 J* Strip 4 
is fixed in place by a Reversed Angle Bracket that serves to hold 
the deck cabin to the deck. 

The model is completed by the addition of the towing beam, 
which consists of a 2h" Strip that is joined to the sides of the 

by Angle Brackets. 

Parts required to build the model steam tug: 4 of No. 2; 4 of No. 5; 4 of No. 10; 
8 of No. 12; 1 of No. 1(5; 1 of No. 22; 3 of No. 35; 24 of No. 37; 3 of No, 37a: 1 of 
No. 38; 3 of No. 111c; 1 of No. 125; 2 of No. 126; 2 of No. 126a; 1 of No. 189. 

Fig. 2 shows a small but interesting model of a horizontal steam 
engine built with Outfit No. 7. The fire-box of this is formed of two 
5j*x24* and two 5£"xl£* Flexible Plates, which are curved to 
the required shape and then overlap five holes. They are bolted 
together as shown in the illustration. The lower ends of the sides of 



is best to commence construc- 
tion by bending a 5 A* Strip 1 



Parts required to build model steam engine: 
1 of No. 3; 6 of No. 5; 1 of No. 6a; 1 of No. 11; 1 of 
No. 16; 1 of No. 17; 3 of No. 18a; 1 of No, 18b; 
1 of No. 20a; 2 of No. 20b; 1 of No. 22; 1 of No. 23a; 
56 of No. 37a; 48 of No. 37b; 22 of No. 38; 2 of No. 
4S; 2 of No. 48a; 1 of No. 51; 2 of No. 52; 6 of No. 59; 
1 of No. 63; 1 of No. 8Uc; 1 of No. 1 1 1 ; 1 of No. 11 la; 
1 of No, 116; 1 of No. 162a; 1 of No. 162b; 2 of No. 
163; 1 of No. 164; 1 of No. IS6a; 2 of No. 188; 3 of 
No, 189; 1 of No. 190; 2 of No. 192; 2 of No. 212: 
1 of No. 214; 2 of No. 217b. 

The scooter is illustrated in Fig. 3. It 



the 



shape 



shown , 



fitting it with a Bush Wheel 







two Flat Trunnions. 



Angle 



Brackets 



next 




The wheel at 



the fire-box are joined by a 2£*x£ 



ir 




Angle Strip. 



The boiler of the engine is represented by a Meccano Boiler, which 
is fixed to the top of the fire-box. The fire-box is next secured to the 
base, which consists of two 5V x 2$" Flanged Plates 1 bolted to- 
gether, by the 2£*xA* Doubfe Angle Strip joining its sides. The 
forward end of the fire-box is filled in by a 2 |* x IT Flanged Plate, 
and the rear end by a compound plate formed by a 2**x2|* 



Flexible Plate and a Semi-Circular Plate. The com 
is secured in position by Angle Brackets. 
The water supply tank 2, which forms also a 



ft e 



und plate 




for 




the 



front 



- 

supported 
two bolts 5 be- 
tween two 

■ 

Strips 4, 



ranged 



in 



similar manner 



to 



the 



ports 



sup- 
for the 






rear wheel. 

The Strips 4 




to the rear end of Strip 

form of a reversed angle bracket, 

and to 

Trunnions. 

volves between 

shanks of 
bolted in 



Fig 



3. The simple scooter constructed as shown above is made 

with parts from Outfit No. 0. 










MECCANO MAGAZINE 



231 



are joined by two Angle Brackets, and one of the bolts that fixes 
the Angle brackets is place carries also a Flat Bracket 6, which 
is attached by a lock-nutted bolt to the SV Strip 1. The model 
is completed with the addition of handle-bars made from two 
%\" Strips overlapped four holes and joined to the Strips 4 by 

Brackets. 




Parts required to 
No. 12; 2 of No. 

2 of No. 126a; 2 of 
No. 155a. 



wild the model scooter: 3 of No. 2; 2 of No. 5; 1 of No. 10; 6 of 
22; 1 of No. 24; 17 of No. 37; 1 of No. 37a; 1 of No. 38; 2 of No. 126: 



the end of the roadway by 5V Strips. The swing span and both 




The 



model 



swing bridge 
shown in Fig. 4 
is built with 
Outfit No. 7. 

Only one fixed 

- 

span 

trated, but 



is illus- 



tliat 



at 





opposite end of 

the swing span 
is 

in 

same manner. 

The swing span 
is opened and 
closed by turn- 
Crank 



in* 



Handle. 




In 




Fig, 4, This neat model swing briuge is built from the contents oi outnt No. 7. The model has two lixed end spans, only one of which 

is shown in the illustration, and a moving one that is operated by turning a crank handle. 



the model the swing span is built first. Its roadway is made from two 



spans are braced with Cord, which is threaded through 
their side members in the manner shown. 

With a few simple modifications the bridge can be adapted for 
driving by a Clockwork Motor. In this case a 3 : 1 ratio reduction 
gear should be fitted to the Motor sideplates and the drive should be 
taken to a 1" Pulley fastened on the shaft of the Crank Handle. The 
Motor of course should be bolted in a fiat position to the base of the 

swing span. 

Parts required to 

build the model 

swing bridge; 10 
of No. 1; 18 of No. 
2; 6 of No. 3; 12 

of No. 5; 8 of No. 

8; 10 of No. 10; 14 
of No. 12; 4 of No. 

12a: 1 of No. 15b; 
I of No, 18a; 2 
of No. 19b; 1 of 
No. I9g; 2 of No. 
22; 1 of No. 26; 

1 of No. 32; 150 
Of No. 37; 160 of 
No. 37a; 26 of 
No. 38; 1 of No. 
45; 1 of No. 46; 

2 of No. 48b; 2 
of No. 52; 3 of 
No. 53; 2 of No. 
59; 1 of No. 62; 
2 of No. Ill; 2 
of No. Ilia; 6 
of ."No, 111c; I 
of No. 186; 6 of No, 
188; 6 of No. 189; 
2 of No. 191: 4 of 



m*x2r 




Plates, which are supported between compou 



1 




take the Rod on which the swing span turns. The 





and 
the 
Angle 



angle girders, each 24 " long and made from two 12£* Angle Girders, 
by means of four Flat Brackets and a 3 J* x I" Double Angle Strip. 
A Crank is next bolted at the centre of the roadway. Its boss later 

of 
the span are then built up in the manner shown, and two are joined 
by means of a S^xi* Double Angle Strip, three 3i* Strips and 
three Angle Brackets. 

Two 5k" x 1 V Flexible Plates are now bent to form a cyline 

this is fixed to the underside of the span at the centre. To 

interior of the cylinder a 3* Pulley is attached by l*xl* 
Brackets, which are spaced from the cylinder by three washers. 

Four bolts indicated at 2, engage with the groove in the Pulley. 

This unit is then attached to the ZVx^" Double Angle Strip I. 
The base for the span 

consists of three 3i"x2£ 
Flanged Plates, connected 

by four I2|* Strips and the 
halves of a Hinged Flat 
Plate 4. On the centre Flang- 
ed Plate is built a 
of Flexible Plates similar to 



No. 192; 2 of No. 195; 2 of No. 197; 1 of No. 198 



No. 191; 

2 of No. 214; 4 of No. 215. 



The fifth model to be described is a trench digging machine that 




ure is m 










on a 






can be built with Outfit No. 4. The su 



travelling base consisting of a 5£* x 2V Flanged Plate fitted with a 3 

1 . A Flanged Sector Plate is bolted in the slotted holes of a 

similar Pulley 2, but is spaced from the latter by washers. The unit 

forms the base of the cab, and the sides are built up from two 

51*x2A*Fle 

is bolted to the Sector Plate as shown. The two Flexible Plates 3 are 

■ . 




Plates 3. An A-frame consisting of 5|* Strips also 



joined at the rear by two 2|* x £* Double Angle Strips, to which are 
bolted a 2A*x2|* Flexible Plate, the sides at this point being ex- 



tended upwards by two Semi-Circular Plates joined by a 2£"xl£ 

Flanged Plate, A small Crank Handle 5 is journalled in the sides of 

the cab and is fitted with two Road Wheels to prevent side movement. 




The boom is pivoted on a 3\" Rod, bearings for which are provided 

by the ends of a 24* xi" 

Double Angle Strip bolted to 
the Pulley 2. At this stage 

the superstructure can be 
fixed to the travelling base, 
and this is effected by lock- 
ing a U" Rod in the boss of 



the one attached to the span, 
and this is fixed to the Plate 
by rxl* Angle Brackets. 
The bolts that hold the 3* 
Formed Slotted Strips sup- 
port also a 3* Pulley by en- 
gaging in its rim. A 4" Rod is 

then locked in the boss 
the Crank at the centre 
the span, and after 

fitted with nine washers it is 

inserted in the boss of the 

It is held in 





3" 






ft 



below tho 3£*x2[ 
langed Plate by a 1* Pul- 
ley. The latter Pulley is con- 
nected by a Driving Band to 
a similar Pulley fastened on 




***o 



Pulley 1, fitting Pulley 2 
loosely on the Rod and 

holding it in place with a 

Cord Anchoring Spring. 
The sides of the boom are 

I2|* Strips, and these are 

joined at their ends by a 



li'x* 



and 



a 



2J*xi 



ft- 



Double Angle 



Strip. 



In 



addition the boom is cross 









Fig. 5. A model digging machine that can be made to dig real trenches in soft sand or gravel. The 

digging motion is controlled from the cab. 



braced by 5; J* Strips attach- 
ed by Angle Brackets to the 
12 J* Strips. Near the lower 
end of the boom is a 3 §* Rod 
that supports one of the 
operating cords. Two 5 J 



Strips 4, each lengthened by 



" 



a 3i 



and a 




it 




the 1J* Rod 3, the upper end of which carries a V Pinion that 



comprise the bucket arm, 



meshes with a 



Wor 



m. 



The two end spans, one of which is shown in Fig. 4, are identical in 
construction, so that a description of one of them will suffice. Con- 
struction of the pier is commenced by bolting two 5V X2 1 " Flexible 
Plates to a 5£* x2i" Flanged Plate, the Flexible Plates overlapping 
the Flanged Plate two holes. One of the Flexible Plates is extended 

t a 5i"x \Y Flexible Plate and the other by three 
xl£* Flexible Plates! 
Two I2i* Angle Girders are bolted to the Flanged Plate to form 



and are joined at their upper ends by a Double Bracket. 

The sides of the bucket are built up from two 2 J* x H* Flexible 
Plates, and are joined by a 54* x 1 J* Flexible Plate that forms the 
back end by a2i*x V Double Angle Strip. The bottom is a 2k" x 2Y 



Flexible Plate supported by two Trunnions and an Angle Bracket 






the sides of the roadway, and between them is a 12JT Strip. To this 
Strip are bolted a £j* x 2$" and a 4£* x 2§* Flexible Plate, the plate 
at the end remote from the pier being supported by a 3.V' Strip. At 
the foot of the pier are bolted four Angle Brackets, to which are 
attached two 12 k" Strips. The free ends of the latter are connected to 



Flat Brackets represent the tines on the cutting edge. The bucket is 
pivotally attached to the bucket arm by lock-nutted bolts 




6 

s tied to the Double Angle Strip of the bucket, then wound several 
times around Crank Handle 5, and taken over the Pulley at the 
top of the A-frame. It is then tied to the bucket arm. 

Parts required to build the model trench digging machine: 2 of No. 1; 8 of No. 2; 2 of 
No. 3; 2 of No. 3; 2 of No. 10; 1 of No. 11; 5 of No, 12; 4 of No. 16; 1 of No. 17; 2 of No. 
18a; 2 of No. 19b; 1 of No. 19g; 4 of No. 22; 1 of No. 23; 8 of No. 35; 66 of No. 37; 2 of 
No. 37a: 5 of No. 38; 1 of No. 48; 5 of No. 48a; 1 of No. 51; 1 of No. 52; 1 of No. 54a; 4 of 
No. 155a; 1 of No. 176; 2 of No. 187; 2 of No. 188; 1 of No. 189; 2 of No. 190; 2 of 
No. 192; 2 of No. 214. 



9 



111 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



nnDDnnnnnnnDannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 

D 






all 



a 



M.M 



jy 



# 



□ 

□ 

D 



nannnnnnnnnnaannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnannnnnnnriinn 










Aircraft of 



v a no us 








always popular subjects 



for Meccano models. They include a great vari 




gns 



that 



of 
are attractive in themselves, and can be 




with 



reproduced 

with small Outfits as 



remarkable 







as with 




and 
ones. 




to 



With a view to encouraging enterprise, and exploiting 

full this field of Meccano construction, we are 




of all ages, no matter whether they live in the British 
Isles or Overseas; and there are no fees to pay or forms 
to fill in. Entries will be divided into two sections: 

A, 
Isles, 




of 



competitors 




living 




in the 
living Overseas. 
The age of each competitor will be taken into con- 










in assessing the merits of his work. 



announcing a 

com- 
petition in 
which prizes 




w 



ill 




e 



awarded for 



the 



best 



Meccan o 
models of any 

air- 
This 



type 
craft 





covers 



aeroplanes of 
all kinds, in- 



cluding 



sea 




The follow- 
ing prizes will 



be 



award ed 



in each sec- 



First 



> 



or 



tion. 

Meccano 

Hornby pro- 
ducts value 

. Sec- 
pro- 
ducts value 

2 / 



£3/3/ 
ond, 




£2 

1 1 1 i r d , 
ducts 



pro- 
value 






planes, flyin 

boats and 




A Meccano model of a hign v%mg monoplane, in Uic construction of which a few Aeroplane Constructor parts have been used. The 

model won a prize in an International Model-Building Competition for L. van der Brock, The Hague, Holland. 








together with airships and gliders, 
etitors may build their models from any Outfit 
er of parts, and those who possess Aeroplane 
Constructor Outfits may include a few of the parts from 
these Outfits, provided that they build the main portions 
of the models from ordinary Meccano parts. It is abso- 



ducts v 




1 

There will be 
also five 
prizes of pro- 





a number of consolation awards 



Competitors should send in either photographs or good 




■ings of their models, 




with a brief ex- 



planation of any interesting feature that may be present, 



although the latter should be made as short 



as poss 












The competitor's age, name and address should be written 



that every entry should be the unaided clearly on the back of each sheet of paper or photograph 



work of the competitor submitting if. Reproductions of 

a m M * - — *. _ _ _ - . __ __ 



mo 




described or illustrated in any of the Meccano 
publications are not eligible for entry in this contest, and 

models submitted will be disqualified, 
contest is open to Meccano model-builders 



sent, together with the letter A or B indicating the Section 



in which 




model is entered. Envelopes should be 




addressed "Aircraft Competition 



tt 



» 




Ltd., Binns 

■ 



Road, Liverpool 13. The closing date for section A is 

1 938 . 



31st 




1938, and for Section B, 30th July 



Special 




Builder Competition 



Owners of Dinky Builder Outfits have a special oppor- 
tunity this month of showing their skill in planning and con- 






structing new models. The parts contained in their Outfits 
can be used to build a great variety of fine models in addi- 
tion to those illustrated in their Instructions Manuals, and 

f 

in order to encourage them to look out for new subjects to 
reproduce we are offering special prizes for original models. 

of the world are 





Readers of any age living in 
eligible for this competition, and there is no limit to the 
number of parts that may be used. Indeed there 



is 



no 



restriction except that entries must be built entirely of 
Dinky Builder parts, and all competitors will have equal 
chances, for their ages will be taken into consideration 

their models. 

necessary to send the actual model. A good 
drawing or a clear photograph is all that is required. Each 
competitor must write his name, address and age on the 

each photograph or drawing submitted, and 

containing his entry should be addressed 






the 




£ 




etiiion" Meccano 



Ltd., 



■ 





'Dinky Builder 
Road, Liverpool 



A competitor may submit more than one model if he 






wishes, and in that case his models will be judged on their 

awarded more than 



joint merits. No com 
one prize 







will 




The prizes offered are ■ as follows. First, Meccano or 




products value 




Second, products value 



; Third, products value 10/6. In addition there will 

value 5/-, and consolation 



other prizes 



of 




awards consisting of Dinky Builder "A" packets of parts. 
The competition will remain open until 30th June, 1938, 
and all entries must reach Liverpool on or before that date. 
Competitors who wish to have their photographs or 
drawings returned to them must enclose with their entry a 




and addressed 







for this purpose. It 
should be noted, however, that photographs or drawings 

of models that win prizes become the property of Meccano 
Ltd., and will not be returned. 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



233 




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verseas Section) 



<• 



The complete list of prize-winners in the Overseas Section of the 




mn 



>> 



General 



Model-Building Competition is 



as follows: 



1st Prize f Meccano or Hornby products value £3/3/-: J. Giese, Buenos Aires. 2nd, 
products value £2/2/-: E. Bourcault, T*ao Nan ( Manchoukuo. 3rd. products value 
£1/1/-: F. Schorre- 



w e e e n 

ui. 



Lierre, 




Products value 10/6: 
J . Rowston f 
Orange, Australia; 
S. Gibbons, Temuco, 

Chile; L. Under, 

Stockholm; D . 

Weily, Orange, Aus- 
tralia; W. Deacon, 

Svdnev. 

Products value 5/-: 

Myburgh,. Clare- 
moot, S. Africa; G. 

M yburgh f Clare - 
iiinnt. S. Africa; A* 
Moxesco, H uenos 
Aires; C, Pearce, 
Regijia t Canada; M. 

l n a i , S 1 1 a p u r» 
India; W. van dar 



nm- 







N . K a 1 ! i i e r i ? , 

Athens; K. Thomas, 
Shanghai; S , 
Roberts, Bom ha v ; 
P. Clark. Calcutta, 

The First Prize 




side of the easel, illuminate the subject while it is being photo- 
graphed. The apparatus can be used also for viewing small 

photographs and stamps. 

J. Rowston won his prize with a very good model of a drop head 

coupe. The model 
is driven by an 
Electric Motor, 4 
and the body is 
built almost en- 
tirely from Strips, 
which are as- 
sembled so skil- 

that it 

been neces- 

sary to bend any 





of 



them . 



The 



Motor is mounted 
under the bonnet, 

and the drive to 
the rear axle is 



rouerh a 




en 






r- 






was awarded to 



The realistic appearance oi this model cruiser is due to the skill ul manner In whicb tne tew parts used are assemmed. i ne model 

won a prize in the "August" Model-Building Competition for S* Gibbons, Temuco, Chile, 



two-speed 

box. As the Motor 
is of the reversing 

type, the model 
actually has two 
forward and two 
reverse speeds, 

of 



and 



Julio Giese, Buenos Aires, for a \*ery pleasing architectural model 
representing the facade of a modern theatre. Although only Angle 
Girders, Strips and Plates, have been used in its construction, the 
model is remarkably realistic. A fine effect is produced by Dinky 
Toys miniature figures and Motor Cars, which are placed at suitable 
points on the pavement and roadway in front of the 



The model that was awarded Second 







building, 
is shown in the 

lower illustration on this page. It was built by Chinese boys of the 
Catholic Mission at T'ao Nan, Manchoukuo, under the guidance 

of E. Bourgault, and represents a Chinese horse buggy. Two 

of the most pleasing features 
of this model are the g< 
work that has been done in 
modelling the horse, and the 
realistic attitude of the driver. 
I like the use of Pawls to repre- 
sent the horse's ears. This is 
the first time that I have seen 



these can be chosen by operating two levers 



any 



one 




ed beside the 



driver's seat. The car is also fitted with headlights, celluloid wind- 



screen, opening doors and a hood. The latter is made of cloth braced 
by Strips, and it folds back exactly as does the hood of a real car 



Rowston 
He says that 



apparently has a great deal of fun operating his model. 

t he starts it off in "bottom" gear and when it attains a 

cnnr.ks over the trear lever into M tOD." The car then 



fair speed knocks over the gear lever into 



bounds forward at so 




top. 



a 
car then 



difficult to keep up with it! 



a speed that the ''driver 11 finds it 






In advising com 




ors regarding subjects 

have 



*!«:• 



these parts employed for such 

a purpose. I " "~ 



congratulate 



E 



on his ingenuity, 



Bourgault 

and hope that the boys of the 

Mission will continue to send in 

entries for the "M.M 



t* 



Con- 



tests. 
F. 



an 



Schorrewegen submitted 
apparatus for copying 
photographic prints and other 

pictures that was awarded 

Third Prize. It consists of a 
horizontal stand carrying at 

one end a platform on wliich a 
camera can be mounted. The 
object glass from an old pair of 

field glasses is fixed in a frame 




the 





advantage 



I 
referred to 
of choosing a 




be repro- 
with the 

available, even if it is 

quite simple. It is 



subject that can 

duced realistically 




som 

much better to build a small 

model properly than to at- 
tempt a big structure without 

the necessary parts to make 
a good job of it. Provided that 
a boy possesses the accessary 

Meccano parts, 

however, it is possible to 
tackle a complicated subject 
with onlv a small Outfit, and 




in 






using 



a 




exam 




mean 



of what I 
this is the fine 

model battleship shown in 

the upper illustration on this 



page 



It will be seen that the 



very few parts used in this 
model are assembled together 



in front of the 




of the 



An interesting model of a refreshingly original subject, a Chinese horse buggy, built by the boys of in such a manner 
the T'ao Nan Mission, Manchoukuo. The constructional details of the horse contain many 

points of interest to model-builders. 




the 



greatest possible effect is ob 



camera, and the frame is provided with an adjusting screw so that 
it can be raised or lowered to suit cameras of various types and 
sizes. The purpose* of the additional lens is to give a combination of 
shorter focal length than that of the camera lens, and so to produce 

a large sharply-focussed image on the film. At the end of the stand 

opposite the camera is a vertical easel, to which the photograph to 
be copied is fastened. The easel is mounted in runners so that it can 
be moved towards or awav from the camera as required for focusing. 
Two lamps, which are mounted on arms pivotally attached to each 



tained from 
model is the work of S. Gibbons, Temuco, Chile, 




piece 



The 



A 




model of a heavy bomber monoplane, 




shows a 



surprising amount of detail work, won a prize for D. Weily. This is 
the first time that Weily has taken part in a Meccano model-buildin 



a 




competition and his early success is very pleasing. His 
attracted attention chiefly on account of the 'neat manner in which a 
mass of detail has been incorporated in so small a space. Even such 
little items as engine exhausts and the wireless aerial are faithfullv 
reproduced. 1 hope to see more of Weily 's work in future contests. 







THE MECCANO 








An Exhibition Hint 

Officials and members of Meccano Clubs take the greatest pains 

to design and construct good models, and to arrange these to the 
best advantage for display purposes. All this good work is largely- 
thrown awav, however, if 



_s are not taken to ensure that 
visitors are really at home and see everything that has been done 





their entertainment. There are several 



ways of doing this. One 




is to distribute programmes explaining the exhibits and, if possible, 
giving a plan of the display. In 
of this kind I 

however, and suggest that at all e 

tions members who are free of 



This Month's Events 

Below I give details of interesting Exhibitions arranged for this 
month and strongly urge all readers of the ' M*M." who live within 
reach of the places in which they are to be held to visit them in 

order to see what members of Meccano clubs can do. I hope that 
many who see such displays for the first time will make up their 



minds to join in the fun of club work 




personal efforts, 






building or display activities should i 
as hosts or guides. 

An Australian Example 

This plan is put into force with splendid 
effect bv the officials and members of the 




ands M.C, 



of 



the headquarters 

which are in Perth, Western Australia. 
At this club's last Exhibition 



impression was 
work of members 
extensive know 







the 

as escorts, and their 

■ < 

e of the outstanding 



features of the models displayed. Those 
who earned this high opinion volunteered 

for the work. 



The Exhibition of this 




rising 




Australian club was noteworthy in many 

. A large stock of Meccano parts 
has been acquired with the aid of club 
funds built up to a high level by previous 
efforts of this kind, and this material was 
used in the preparation of what were 
described as communal models for the 







In addition members showed 



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Details of the 7th Annual Exhibition of the Old Charlton M.C., 

to be held on 2nd April, were given in 
last month's issue, but I should like to 
remind readers that it will be open from 



Meccano Club Secretaries 



N 



O. 



44. 



J. Cronin 



models built from their own Outfits, and p 
thus individual enterprise and co-opera- 
tion were both strongly encouraged. 

There is always a definite idea behind 
a May lands Exhibition. On this occasion 
the hall was transformed into a gigantic 
model motor show, which was christened 
"Mecctwolympia." The name was 
ouglily deserved, for there were on view 
motor cars of all kinds, from crude early 
models to modern streamline saloons, 
omnibuses, and lorries. In addition there 

models to demonstrate the 

mysteries of the gear-box, the differential, 




were s 




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4 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Assembly Rooms, 
Charlton Village. The charge 





be 3d. 




F 




ad- 



Id. 



miss 

for others. 

The Mall School M.C. will hold their 
Annual Exhibition on Wednesday, 6th 
ril, in the School Gymnasium. The 
display will be open continuo 

p.m. to 7 p.m. There will be no 




2.45 





charge for admission 



but there will be 





a box for voluntary subscriptions from 
visitors. 

An Exhibition also has been organised 
by the St. Oswald's M.C. for 23rd 

April. This will be open from 4.30 p.m. 

9.30 p.m. in the Quest Hall, 
Road, Thornton Heath. The admission 

charges will be 3d. for adults and Id. 
for children. 

I should like also to draw attention 
to an Exhibition arranged by the Maid- 
stone Branch of the H.R.C., which is 



associated with the Maidstone Model 

Railway and Engineering Club. This 



will be held in the 



Hollingworth Hall, 




J. Cronln is secretary of the Islington M.C, and also of 
the associated Branch No. 290 of the H.R.C. Under the 
able guidance of Mr, V. Miller, their founder, these 
two organisations have made steady progress in the 
face of many difficulties. Successful Exhibitions have 
attracted many interested visitors, and the displays have 

been given great praise in the local press. 



□ 

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Union Street Maidstone, on 28th, 29th 
and 30th April. On the first two days 
it will be open from 6.30 to 9.30 p.m., 
and on the third , Saturday, 30th 
from 3 p.m. to 9.30 p.m. All 
models will be on show, including working 

Meccano super models, and 






D 

a 



model- building competitions have been 

arranged, details of which can be 

obtained from the secretary, W, R. C. 

The Orchard, Romney Hill. The 
price of admission is 6d. 





□nana 



Proposed Clubs 




clutch and steering gear. The Exhibition was open for six 
nights, and was very largely attended at each. There is no doubt 
that a display of this kind is far more attractive than one at 
which an indiscriminate selection of models built in accordance 

this example is one 






with members* own fancies are shown, 
that could well be followed by other clubs. 




■ 



F 



ut\as 




for Summer Outings 



With this month it may be said that the season for outings com- 
mences, and the problem of raising funds for these will soon have to 
be faced. The best plan undoubtedly is to start an Outings Fund 
now. Members pay small sums weekly to the Leader, or some official 
specially appointed for the purpose, and withdraw money as tliey 
need it for excursions and visits. 




made to establish Meccano Clubs in the 
boys interested should communicate with 




Attempts are 
following places, 

the promoters, whose names and addresses are given below: 

Seven Kings— C. Boddington, 32, Mitcham Road, Seven Kings, 

Thurles — R. Molloy, Ballingarry, Thurles, Co. Tipperary, Ireland. 
Whitby— A. Cook, The Haven, 32, Castle Road, Whitby. 

Worthing — H. Turner, 23, Pavilion Road, Worthing, Sussex. 
Norwich — K. Fanthorpe, 132, Magdalen Street, Norwich* 
Potters Bar-K. Lansdowne, 63, Hatfield Road, Potters Bar, Middx, 

amington Spa — D. S. McLusky, 9, York Road, Leamington Spa. 




Wokingham — F. Weight, "San Remo 



it 



* 



92 



Bark ham 










gham, 
Ceylon — P. T. 

Ceylon. 





Fernando, Sri Sumungala College, Panadure, 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



235 






MX* — Membership has increased 
factorily and successful meetings are being held. An 
epidiascope is being built in the club room. Photography 
is a new hobby taken up at special Camera Meetings, 
and visits are being made to local engineering centres. 
Club roll: 1L Secretary: Mr. R. A. McKeough, Ware 

Street, Bearstad, Nr, Maidstone* 
Breich MX.— The Annual Exhibition increased the 
of the club by more than £L The models on show 
included a pithead gear, an articulated lorry, a wire 
making machine and a ship's crane. As usual, the club's 
Hornby Railway attracted interested attention, and the 
ibition closed with: a Lantern Lecture, given by 
Mr. Cartwright, on ui A Day with the RodS* Club roll: 10. 

M. Anderson* 36, Breich Terrace, West Calder. 

Brvntirion MX. — The club's 1st Birthday was 














celebrated by a Social E veiling, the attractions of which 
included a Lantern Lecture, Games and Refreshments, 

the presentation of pri7.es won by members* A 

Railway Section has been formed, and is 
making excellent progft-ss* Model* 
building, in preparation for the 
Exhibition, and Lantern Lectures 
have been the chief pursuits, and 
the Stamp Section also has 
operations. Club roll: 18. Secretary: 
P. Parry, Ar-v-Bryn, Pennllwyu 
Park, Carmarthen. 

Burnley Grammar School MX, 

Mr, Bennett, Senior History Master, 

gave an interesting Lecture on 



were asked to bring friends with them, and music and 
refreshments helped to make a very enjoyable evening. 
Club roll: 25. Secretary: L. R. L Gliddon, Sheffield 

House, Sidinouth. 
St. James' (Grimsby) MX,— A splendid Exhibition 

has been held. This attracted a large number of visitors 

and earned an appreciative report in the local press. 

The receipts were more than £3/10/-. constituting a 

record for the club. Models on view were again seen at 

the G rims by and District Model Engineers 1 Society 

Exhibition, Club rolh 12. Secretary: P. Jackson, 99, 

St. Peter's Avenue, Qeethorpcs, 

St Oswalds MX.— Recent events of special interest 
have included Birthday Celebrations, marked by a 
well-attended Social and a Cinema Show kindly given 

by Mr. Peart»* Mod el -building has been 

marks being awarded to models by members of the 
committee. The programme also includes Billiards 

and Table Tennis. Club roll: 30. Secretary: J* F. Jaques, 
5j Ingram Road, Thornton Heath, Surrey. 



subjects by Mr. S. C* Fortune, Leader, Club roll: IS. 
Secretary; K, Rushent, Westwood Road, Tilehurst, 

Reading. 

Todmorden Road Central School MX.— The Winter 
Exhibition attracted the attention of many visitors, 

were greatly interested in the Model 





designed and constructed by members for the event. 

'rUSrT ;„„!,. A** A „**,„»* chine *n,l ht-i<lffM *41^1ttW»d 



and 







bridges displayed 

Train 






Brass Rubbings, 
talk with examples. Other meetings 
ve been devoted to model* 






ing, in which steady pro^ 
is being made. Club roll: 25. Secre- 
tory: J> Harrison, 5, Arbories 
Avenue. Padiham, Burnley, Lanes* 
Colchester MX. — Members are 
interested in the "Keep Pit" move- 
ment, and all meetings now include 
a short spell of physical training. 
A Cycling Section also is in prospect. 
For Model-building two groups have 
been formed. Members of one group 
have built a model of Watt's beam 

L* It. 1 

engine incorporating a ,4 Pcnny-in~ 

the-slot" mechanism. The juniors 
have become proficient in building 

large models, and have constructed 
an excellent reproduction of an 

electric locomotive. Several model 
escalators also have been made. A 

third group has been formed for 
Hornbv Train operation. Club roll: 

35. Secretary: F. D. Cole, 8, Priory 
Street, Colchester, Essex. 

Islandmagee MX.— Affiliation 
was Secured in January, and keen 
enthusiasm is being shown, 
meetings are devoted to Model- 
building, but a Hornby Railway 
also has been installed and a Library has been estab- 
lished. Interesting Lectures have been given by Mr. A. 

Storey, President, and by the secretary and treasurer. 
Arrangements are being made for the production of a 
magazine. Club roll: B. Secretory: S, McCready, "Hill- 
mount," Islandinagce, Co. Antrim* 

Islington MX,— Recent meetings have been devoted 
to Model- building and members 1 hobbies, and at each 
there has been a talk on some subject of interest, such 
as the equipment of a fire station and the making of 
steel tubes. On one evening a member gave a talk on 
his stamp collection, and on another there was a 
wireless demonstration. Club roll: 5. Leader: Mr, V. 

Miller, 
Mall 




This included cranes, snips 

along with an excellent Hornby Train layout. A 

feature of the layout was; a large lift bridge, and 
coloured lights and illuminated buildings added 
to the attractiveness of the display. Club roll: 20. 
Secretary: L. Lang, 26, Colville Street, 

Moston MX. —The club is making excellent progress. 
The stock of Hornby material has been greatly in- 
creased, and six locomotives are now available. Com* 
petitions are a special feature of the programme, each 
member in turn devising a contest in which the others 

part. Club roll; 7. Secretary: J. Roberts, 20. 
Worslev Avenue, Moston, Manchester 10. 

AUSTRALIA 

Melbourne MX.— A splendid 
series of club meetings and com- 
petitions has been held, visitors 
being entertained at sonic of these. 
Trial runs have been made with 



take 



which were 

Great 



se vera t locomo u ves, 
tested on uphill grades 
interest was displayed in a sound 
record of an American train in 
movement. Discussions on railway 
matters, Film Shows and Visits have 
completed the programme. Club 

roll: TO. Secretary: L. I son, 8, Hayes 
Street, Northcote N.18, 

Australia. 




CANADA 



Roscmount 



MX. 



An 

for 



the right, and Mr. 

club was affiliated 




A fine group of members of the Ashhurton MX., with Mr. Bishop, President, on 
W. C. Taylor, Leader, seconj from the left in the middle row. This New Zealand 
in January 1931, and enjoyed a record year during 1937. A special feature of the programme is 

the exchanges of visits with the Christehurch MX, 



(Regina) 
Exhibition has been planned 
Easter* This will Include many new 
and interesting models that have 
been planned and built by members. 
Among them will be a remarkably 
realistic grain separator with a 
tractor* a working model of a river 

dredger with pontoon lenders, and 
a large cement mixer. Members con- 
tmue to be keen and are producing 
models of very high standard* 
Secretary: J. Watson, 974, Athol 

Street, Regina- 

NEW ZEALAND 

Ashburton MX.— The report for 
1937 just received shows that year to 
have been of intense activity, especi- 

for the cups 

is 





interest 
visitors 

Lecture 




a. i*caaer: 

25, Bewdley Street, London, N.l. 
School MX. — Treasure Hunts are greatly 

enjoyed by members, and two of these interesting 

events have been held. Other meetings have included a 
Cinematograph Show and Model-building Nights, one 



Stafford Public Libraries M C— Many splendid 
models have beca built by membcre. including a heavy 
motor and trailer, a mechanical drill, a ship, and a 
loading crane, the working of which aroused 

among members. A special display to which 

were invited also was arranged, A Lantern 

entitled mi Across Camuki" attracted an 

of 76 members and friends* The Sump Club 

making good progress, Many excellent stamps 

have been presented to the club ami shared among 

A Lantern Lecture on "Stamp Collecting" 
proved very popular, members bringing friends to 
share in its enjoyment. Club roil: 33. 
F* Scattcrgood, Public library, Technical Institute, 

stretford Road, Old Tra'iord, Manchester T6. 

Sutton Valence MX. — Talks are given on simple 
machines and mechanisms, and models are now 

illustrations. The 



is 






ally in competition 

awarded annually. One of 

for recruiting, and its presentation 

to the club by Miss M. Krnse has led 
to the introduction of many new members. Parents' 
Night was particularly successful. There were nearly 

120 visitors, who were" welcomed by Mr. Bishop, Pre si* 
dent, and afterwards inspected the models, some of 
which were contributed by members oi the Christchurch 
MX- An eniovable evening was then spent with games 
and refreshments, including a birthday cake kindly 
presented bv Mrs. Krnse, Club roll: 33. Leader: Mr* C, H, 
Taylor, Up Grey Street, Ash burton. New Zealand. 



SOUTH AFRICA 



' 



Alexandra MX* 




of which took the form of a competition, 
preparations have been made for the club's Exhibition* 
to be held this month. Club roll: 30. Secretary: A, C. 
James, 45, Popes Grove, Twickenham! Middlesex. 
Sid Vale MX.— The usual programme of attractive 
and carefully planned Model- building Contests has 
been continued. 1 he subjects have included "AttecaJt,! 1 

* "Household Utensils" and "lighthouses," 
in each there were many excellent entries 
maintaining the high standard attained in this club* 
Table Tennis continues to be played, and Lantern 
Lectures and Photography provide other interests. A 
Special Party was held early in the New 



Bridges, 













beitig built to serve as illustrations, i ue younger 
members are engaged in a scheme tor building models 

of machines used in everyday life, including the 

Motor Bus, the Tractor and the Plough. A Football 
Match has been played against a School team, the 
result beinc a goalless draw. Club roll: 21. Secretary: 

C Austin, East Sutton Park, Sutton Valence. Maid- 

stone, Kent. 

Tilehurst and District MX.— Recent meetings have 

been devoted to the construction of models for the 

forthcoming Exhibition* Free play is given to members 1 
OWH ideas of construction, and the result is keenness 

and enthusiasm. One member has entertained the club 

with a Film Show, Talks have been given on various 









A special meeting to which visitors 
were invited was arranged for the Exhibition of 
models built by members. These included a very 
original reproduction of a maize mill, a fire brigade van, 
a swivelling crane, a clock dial and a reproduction of the 
Curtard White Star liner "Queen Mary." Miniature Cups 
were presented to the winners of the Model Engineering 
Troph v, and engineering badges were presented to other 
members who distinguished themselves in model-build- 
ing. Secretary: K. Bowman, "The Rest," Alexandra 
Institute, Koeberg Road, Maitland, South Africa, 

Southern (Capetown) MX, — Excellent progress is 
being made in all branches of club activity. A specia 
event was a summer holiday in Stellenbosch, 30 miles 
from Capetown. Fishing t swimming and mountaineer- 
ing were enjoyed, but Meccano was not forgotten and a 
model was built of an interesting bridge seen on the way 
to Stellcnbosch. Lectures and Stamp Collecting are 
other regular interests. Club roll: l« : S&retary; 
R. fcL Moodley, 10, Stirling Street, Capetown, S.A. 



— 




THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 







□DDDDnaDDDD □□ 



A 




Layout Designed 



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Sub 



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ban 




By H. C. Towers 





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THE Back Bay Railway is a miniature line that commenced its 
existence in Bombay in December 1936. when my son found that 











Hornby Train 




my 
were among his Christmas gifts. Extra 

rails, points and accessories were obtained with the idea of com- 
binmg the contents of the two Sets in order to form one system, 

" down running from one room along a verandah. 




a 






was 



1 





a n 




oinmg room. 



This layout was quite a success. It was so extensive that it took 
a considerable time to put down, however, and after some ex- 
perience it was decided to build a raised baseboard on which to 
lay the line permanent I v. When the necessary trestles and tables 
had been completed, various layout designs were tried, and it was 




after the 




of many plans 



being known as " 
miniature military 




and 



unu 





'el.** The presence of the fort and of the 
ires in and around it gave an interesting 



aspect to this part of the svstem. 



Passing round another curve the railway ran over a small single- 
reaching the bridge, however, 




bridge. 




M 



span lattice 

the main line gave off the terminal branch'serving "Central" and 
connecting also with the main line again near I,T?, - V - 




circle" or main con 




Elg 



one was finally adopted. This is 
shown in the diagram on this page. 

As the diagram shows, the track was 

of the favourite continuous type, and 
was single line throughout, with a branch 
line running to a terminal station. In 

effect it was a long oval track that had 
been doubled back on itself, so that in 
shape it resembled the letter "J." There 

was a terminal branch and a useful con- 

nection by means of points between the 

terminal section and the 

the upper side of the layout. Although 



in Avenue." 
route completed its course to 
the latter place, from the bridge previously referred to, by running 

parallel to the terminal branch and then swinging 

"Central." 

There were thus four stations altogether on the line, and three 

of them were built of solid teak and 





AVENUE 




SU 



CENTRAL 



RIDGE 



iilliiiliihiill 

.i.HfiHM|H||-U 





on 



The plan of the Back Bay Railway, the story 
of which Is told in this article. At the head 
of the page are two views of the system. The 
one on the left shows a scene near "Citadel" 
station and on the right a 

coach Is seen enter- 




ing ''Elgin Avenue. 



small stations were possible the limits of 
space prevented any attempt at model- 
as engine sheds or even 
for these take up a fair amount of room. As a 
result the railway was laid out and its operation planned on the 



►-3 




grey. At each end of these the 
station name was prominently displayed 
on nameplates of the style used on 
many city and suburban 

actual name appearing 

across a circular background or "target. 

As the line was a "city" one, retaining 

were fairly frequent, and for 




a 







lines of a metropolitan 





serving different districts 



CITADEL 






a 

The main terminal station was appropriately called "Central, 
being situated inside the area enclosed by the main line. This 
consisted of an island platform with a track running on each side 

of it. The main through station was named "Elgin A venue /' and 

represented a station actually in the city. Here a flight of steps led 
from the platform to the station building, which was carved out 
of wood, glued together and painted to represent red brick. Outside 

the *- " * ... 



lW 



these plywood 

used. Adv 







or grey was 










were then cut from various 



journals and fixed to the walls by 



Se ceo tine. The dis 
w it h the type 
adopted, gave 




of these, together 
station nameplates 
line an appearance 



very suggestive of a suburban system. 



The 




were screwed down to 





the baseboard, and the track was 
ballasted with a mixture of 
very small pebbles picked up on the 

care was taken in 




this, as 







station and retaining 




- 







* 



station was arranged a main street with suitable background 
*ng various city buildings 




"Elgin Avenue" was a short tunnel, and near to this 
a model factory. The latter was also constructed of wood, a "rough- 
cast" surface being obtained by covering the sides of the building 
with hot glue and sprinkling it evenly with crushed coal. When 



used 



this was dry a coat of red paint completed it. At "West Point" 
the line passed from commercial and industrial surroundings and 



;d the suburbs, the scenery here representing typical country- 
Features and also a small residential estate. The wayside 



side fe 

halt in this charming neighbourhood consisted of a standard 



Hornby Passenger Platform. The line then swept in a half circle 



round the base of a lar^e model fort, 





serving this 



wall decoration, to preserve the neat and tidy appearance character- 
istic of an efficient concern. Train services were operated by 
four Hornby Locomotives, two M3 Tanks and two No. O 0-4-i) 

engines. The rolling stock consisted of three No. 1 com- 
partment-type Coaches and a Guard's Van. There were also two 
Pullman Coaches, all these vehicles being of Hornby manufacture. 
Additional services were worked also by an interesting model 
of a "Sentinel-Cammeli" steam coach of the type widely 
on the L.N.E.R. This is a useful unit for traffic of the kind repre- 
sented on the layout as it incorporates its own motive power 
and can be made' to run either forward or backward as required 
by the operations of the moment. 

The layout was operated in this manner for some time, but 
removal to England and the commencement of school by the 
owner caused the temporary closing down of the system. It is 
now being laid down again. There is space for fuller development 



and eventually a track 




no doubt will be evolved. 




from the original 







MECCANO MAGAZINE 



237 



□□□nan 





Prominent Feature 



□□□□□□ 







REMARKABLE feature of the miniature railway hobby is 
the mariner in which layouts in the course of their expansion 

from a simple train sot quickly develop individual characteristics. 

These naturally vary according to the ideas of the respective railway 
owners, the space at their disposal and sometimes the practice 
on the real railway that is being followed in miniature. 



are four corners to be dealt with. 



■_ 




viaduct scheme 




described is adopted at two of them and suitable lineside effects 
are arranged for the others, a miniature town being set up in the 
one case and a model village in the other. In addition, a farm 
is situated between one of the viaducts previously referred to 



m 



The layout shown 
e two illustra- 




tions on this page has 
various feature; 



render it of 

It is operated 

E. R. Sum in 




and the inner single track loop line. All of these are peopled with 

Dinky Toys figures, 

and miniature road 
vehicles and ani 



of 







Litherland, an 
"AfJtf." reader, and 

e pur- 
small 



began with 

of 





a 
clockwork Hornby 

Train Set. In the 
course of nine years 
it has developed to 
such an extent that 
the track is 256 ft. 
long. Thus it is in 

striking contrast with 

the small oval layout 
from which it star 






Dinky Toys 

Series are also in 







evidence. These help 
to give an aspect 

of fife and 
that covers up de- 
fects of ..the type 
pointed out. 





play 
an important part 



in the realism 



of 



the line 



Care 





n taken to 
ment the various ac- 

cessories and features 

that are near the 




A corner on the layoul ol l£.K. bum m erne ki, Lithertamt. The girder bridge in tne foreground crosses Iroin one part 

af the baseboard to the other. Behind the line is a picturesque scenic background. 



line 




means of 







very position of the railway is unusual. The track is 




! 





down permanently on a raised baseboard in the space between the 
roof of its owner's home and the ceilings of the rooms on the top 
floor. A considerable area is thus available and, although there are 

not hampered by the house 
walls as it would be if arranged in the ordinary way in a room 

the lower lioor. 



i , 



sets , 



n 




on 




background scenes, 



•wood and form as it were a series of 




certain limitations, the 



to use a film expression, practically the whole way round 
. At one end the views are of mountain and river scenes. 

and when it 



the 

Then the line curves and 





a 



w 




im- 



passes 
has become wilder and 




more rugged, for 



on 






The operation of trains on the layout is particularly interesting 



emerges the scenery 

mountains alone are in the background along this length. As the 

line curves the country descends to the sea, for mountain and 



and involves the use of a 




range of Hornby material. 




system is of the continuous tvpe, and consists of an outer double 



marine views are the feature of this end of the system. Along 
the remaining side of the layout the scenery is of a more general 



track main line with an inner single line running parallel to it. 




The lineside effects there include a fort and a repro- 



Along the single line are two running loops that branch off from it 
at one point and rejoin it further on. These loops are of considerable 

value in the continuous 
type of working that is 
practised on the sys- 
tem. From the inner 
one branches a line 

- I • - i la 

that ultimately resolves 
itself into two sidings 
serving a 



duction of Windsor Castle, both of which look very picturesque 

and give a distinctly interesting appearance to this part of the line. 

The railway is electrically operated, and the locomotive stud 





1 here are two stations 
for passenger traffic. 
One of these consists of 

struc- 




a single pi 

ture, and the other is 



in the 




of an 



island between 

lin 



inner 



smg 




e 



the 

and 

the inside double track. 

Across two of the 

inner corners of the 



■ 



baseboard viaducts 
built of Meccano parts 

carry 




* 

in 




es 






a 



M 




Royal Scot, 
L.M.S. Locomotive and 

tender, an L.N.E.R, 

E220 Tank Locomotive 

a 
_ric 

The "Royal Sot" of 

course is used to haul 






■ 



motive. 



the 

■ > 

trains 

distances non-stop. The 

Loco- 




run 




Metropolitan 

- M . « 



motive 



is 



used 





most of the 

trains. 



passenger 



are 



arunged 




Another part ot the layout, snowing a passenger station and a goods depot. A splendid appearance oi activity 

is given by the use of Dinky Toy figures and various accessories on the platforms. 



the track that is nearest to the edge of the baseboard at each of these 
points. This is an interesting method of avoiding difficulties at 
corners where the track sometimes is awkwardlv placed. Exactlv 

can be seen 








how these are overcome on this 

in the lower illustration on tins page. 

The corners of the baseboard indeed frequent lv present problems 
to the miniature railway engineer. It is difficult to conceal the fact 
that there the curves of the track are proportionally much sharper 

than they would be in real practice, and as a result it is not easy 
to arrange the lineside features in a satisfactory manner. On 

this system, however, the corners of the layout have all received 

there 



local 

The L.N.Eru. Tank 
engine alone is respon- 
sible for goods 

and is used to haul all 

the express goods trains 

operated on the line. 




The No. 1 Locomotive performs a wide variety of miscellaneous 
duties. 

The rolling stock in use is varied, and well chosen for the different 

services. A unique character is given to some of the main line trains 
by the use of L.M.S. stock along with vehicles of the Internationa] 




ing uar company. These are represented bv Hornby No. 2 
Corridor Coaches and the well-known Riviera "Blue" components 

respectively. For stopping and intermediate services No. 1 Rolling 

Stock is largely employed, No, 1 Pullmans being included in 

trains. For 




composition of the more important of 





treatment. As the baseboard 






is rough lv 



rectan 




local passenger and suburban work Metropolitan stock is chieflv 
in use, along with the Metropolitan Locomotive. 



238 



THE MECCANO 





THE SETTING OF A HORNBY RAILWAY LAYOUT 






consists only of 
1 a layout may 



MINIATURE railway layout 

track is not completely realistic, 

of the greatest interest as regards planning and 
operation, yet it will not look like a real railway unless 
some attention has been given to the setting and general 
surroundings of the line. Rather will it have the appear- 

"nowhere in particular/' for the 



ance of being situated 



natural 







lavout is to enclose 

the 



r a i 1 w a y 



features that are seen on 

absent. 

and simplest step in the improvement of a 



and both kinds .are 



very realistic in 



appearance 





again when 

be a matter of some difficulty. With 




On miniature railways, particularly those of the kind 
have to be put down when required and taken up 

with, the inclusion of cuttings used to 

Cuttings, 
however, any temporary layout can have such features 

arranged in as realistic a manner as on a permanent 

model railway. The cutting banks of fabric material are 

formed to a realistic shape, and the colours used give them 

a verv desirable appearance. As in the case of the 











means 






of fencing, the im 



mediate 

which is to 




better 



and 



of 

give a 
more 




provision of fencing 



or 



some 





is an im- 
matter, as 
companies 






, the 
tings are made to a 
standard length of 
10J in. They can be 
employed effective- 
in conjunction 
with one or other of 
the Hornby Tun- 





s, 



which 




are bound to 

close their 

Hornb v 
Fencing is very use- 
ful and effective for 

lineside use, and for 
setting boundaries 

to the railway premises generally. It possesses the 
valuable feature that it can be curved readily to conform 
with the 
an angle 



are 
of similar 
material and given 
the same finish. 

Sometimes 
nels of special shape 
or size to fit in 
special positions are 
necessary. It is not 




difficult 
ise at 





make 
The 



An interesting phoEograpn snowing the use of a painted background in conjunction wftn a tiamel and other 

actual features. The tunnel face Is of cardboard, arranged as described In the article. 




sweep 








can be bent at 











Then there are natural features 




as 




trees 



and banks at the side of the line. Such items are included 
in the range of Hornby Accessories. Hornby Hedging can 
be used to border the railway property, and it can also be 
used to divide fields or placed along the sides of roads. It 

on a wooden base, so that it is easy to put 



of the tun- 

mav be made 

. and 




up of wood, or even from a strong cardboard 
crumpled brown paper that has previously been soaked in 





be arran 




over 









contours that may be required can easily be obtained by 
laying the covering surface over "hills" consisting of 



is 




down or take up, and as the standard length is 10] in., or 
the same as that of a Hornby Tinplate Straight Rail, it is 



masses of brown paper crum 




to the desired 





a simple matter to find how many lengths are require* 
alongside a given piece of 




c. It 




can 





it- 



required to fit in a particular position, scissors being used 



on the 





g e 



itself and a saw on the base. 



ng alone is not enough to give complete realism. 
Trees also are necessary, and splendid miniature trees are 
available in the Hornby Series, These are manufactured 
in two kinds, representing Oaks and Poplars respectively, 



Cardboard can be used very effectively in the repro- 
duction of the mouth or face of a tunnel. There is a great 
deal of choice in the matter of the architectural features 
of the tunnel mouth, and the type to be adopted can be 
settled according to the taste of the model railway 
owner, A simple but effective design is that shown in the 

on this page. This represents a plain brick- 
built tunnel face having a slightly oval bore or mouth to 
accommodate double track, and there is a 
buttress at each side of the opening, It was constructed 





from 





paper of the 

and similar purpose s 



and finished 

that 





' pasting on it printed 
is sold for dolls' houses 



An interestin 





ure 




out the 




of this tunnel is 



THE 




MAGAZINE 



239 



that there are two marks near the crown of the arch 
where the ** smoke" of the passing trains has dirtied the 
bricks. This is a characteristic feature of tunnel faces and 




es on a steam- operated 



duct ion m 




is a neat touch 




its repro- 

. The 



smoky marks can be painted, or they can be "smudged" 

on with a finger 

on which there 

is just the 

est 
of soot. 

When part of 

the railway cuts 



are then cut out with the aid of a sharp pen-knife, 
guided by a steel rule or a Meccano Girder, and they are 
assembled with the aid of Seccotine or glue, A good plan 
where broad flat surfaces are in use is to stiffen these by 
sticking a strip of wood on the inside of them. 



Passing now from items on or 










t 




7 



a 



river or stream, 
a suitable 
bridge or via- 
duct is neces- 

sary. The 

wJf 

Hornby Series 

Viaduct is of an 

i nteresting de- 
sign and can be 




the line to the 
more remote de- 

we have to 

the 




t 



consider 



provision 

of background 

scenery. It is 

the background 

that com 
the 




th >\ layout and 
adds the finish- 
ing touch to the 

nearer 

. Colour- 



effects 





ed 



papers with 

■ mm 



scenic designs 





to 



bridge 



operations in pr 

therai 





in a small but eflective goods yard. Good use is made ot Hornby paicu renting, wnicn encloses 
ay property and may be considered as forming the simplest type of scenery. 



any real or imaginary waterways. It is so designed that it 
is higher than the rail level, as it usually is difficult, 



on them can be 
used with ad- 




on a 



suitable 





layout 



> 



to arrange any 



Viaduct to cross. For 




reason it is provided with sloping approaches at each end. 



As the Viaduct will accommodate single track only, a 
special system of single track working has to be put into 
operation for trains passing over it when it is incorporated 



in a double track line. Such arran 



real 




are found in 



11 




and even such a famous train as 




Cornish Riviera Limited" has to pass over a sing 




section when 



of 




from Devon into Cornwall 



Brunei's 

If 





ge 





such papers are rather rare in these days, 
alternative, which is really the better method, is to 




of 




make a background that suits the 

layout. An effective way is by painting the required scene 



on strips of plywood, which are then erected at the 



e 




e of the layout. 

This scheme makes it possible for the scenery to follow 

track round curves and so on, if neces- 

f 



the course of 




sary. A very good idea of what can be done in this way 
can be seen from the description of the layout on page 237 



of this issue, where plywood has been used most success- 



fully as a 




round material. Even 



means 

Saltash 

the single span of the 

Viaduct is not sufti- 



por 







\Y 







cient additional 
centre sections can 
be used to extend it. 

Meccano 




r 







S t a t ions are 

lineside ob- 
le necessity 
for them is clear, but 




jects. 







article dealing 



sta- 



an 

with 

tions appeared in the 





e provided with 

scenery in tins way 
if the lengths of ply- 
wood 

with 

ports at the back. 
A favourite scheme 
on permanent lay- 
outs is to use 








am 



blue wallpaper,which 
gives a 







cground, and 
use paints or coloured 




cs 



to 



indicate 

. It 




what is 

is not necessary to 




anv 




The miniature road overbridge, retaining wall and bank give a realistic air to this photograpu, me train 

under the bridge is headed by a Hornby L.K.E.R. locomotive of the "Hunt" class. 










S- 



obtain 

ory results, 
much care 






so t h at t he\ 




Platforms and Signal 



not be specially considered here. Goods 

s are other accessory buildings 





this as in any 

much detail is not 



work 




should 
on a miniature 
. Sufficient 




of importance, each for its own particular purpose. It is main features it is desired to show is all that is necessarj 

~ects such as are seen on many present-da"} 




however, that some 





ing 



often 

structure- is required. Tins inav be a hut, a house, or even 

a factory. For the construction of these cardboard is very 
useful. It requires some little care in its management, 
but if trouble is taken no difficulties should arise. 







should be aimed at. 




is arranged in the form of a strip 

out, it is necessary 




well-built cardboard structure 




a 




long life. When making one it is important to mark out 

the cardboard carefully, according to the measurements 






the 
deep to give the effect 



and the design of the accessory to be constructed. Parts 



running lengthways 
to make this 

distance 
of the 

and it may be three or even four times 

with advantage. 




required-. For good results the 
should be at least "twice that of the trams, 

_-_ — 





height 



240 



THE 



j 






Bran 




New 



'S 



Whitgift School. — The majority of 
meetings have been devoted to _ Hornby 



Train 




A Lecture on "The 



Industrial Railways of Great Britain" was 
given by one of the members. Various 
Competitions have proved an attractive 

feature of the Branch programme, and it is 

arrange for a party to 
me ot tne many factories in the 





L.N.E.R. track. A visit 





to an 



Exhibition held at Castle Station, North- 



ampton, where me 




inspected L.M.S. 



locomotives No. 20002 and 






it 



The Northamptonshire Regiment, 



No. 




and 



a 




train of modern stock. Secretary: E>. G. 
B ush , r ' Ston e I c a , " \\ e s t Haddon , Nr . Hu 

Mr r 

Mexbo rough Secondary School.- — The 

Branch track has been re-arranged each 
week by different members, and alterations 
in timetables have been to provide services 



district. Secretary: C. P. Dear, 36, 
Spring Park Road, Shirley, Surrey. 

re- 
cent ioint Exhibition of the Branch 

■I 

and the associated Meccano club was 



St, Stephens (Salt ash). 




very succ 




ul. The Branch's share of 



the proceeds has been used 




the 

of additional rails and 

points in connection with the electrifi- 




cation scheme. The s 




track is to 




altered s 




i 




so that a model of 



Millbay Station built 




members 





may be brought into use. A novel 
event was a visit from Mr. W. 

of the Plymouth Branch, who 
described his own visit to the Elm side 
Branch, Exeter. Secretary: B. 
Brau nd, 9, Homer Park, Saltastu 



Abergavenny. — Visitors 



to 



the 




Exhibition greatly enjoyed 
train operations, especially at night, 
when stations and trains were electric- 



ITALY 



Milan. 



re 




ar services 




operations continue, 

and the 




greatest importance being paid to punctual- 
ity. Delays are rare, but an event that 



gave rise to keen discussions and a search 



in 




enquiry 

a goods train running 

track 



was a collision caused 




on to a 







of 




occupied by a Pullman 









ally lighted. More locomotives and 

coaches have been purchased, and 
new timetables have been tried out 
with excellent results. Arrangements 

made for a larger 




are now 

Branch room in which the track can 
be extended. Secretary: J. C. Baker, 
White House, Llanfoist, Nr. Aber- 




were 



gavenny, Mon. 
Ply m outh. — Mem 

extremely busy preparing 
successful Annual Exlubition held in 
December, Some of the members 





express. The Christmas Social was very 

enjoyable. Violin selections were 

contributed bv Air. A. Sacchi, and 
Mr. C. 

prizes 
Branch 




won 



0, President, 

members 








and the associated Meccano 



club. Secretary: 
Genova 19, Milan, 




Corso 



Branches ia Course of 

Formation 

The following new Branches of 

the Hornby Railway Company are 

at present in process of formation, 
and anv bovs who are interested and 
desirous of linking up with this 

organisation should communicate with 
the promoters, whose names and 
addresses are given below: 

aston — E. A . Fetherston, Hoi kirk, 
2, Field Drive, Alvaston, Derby. 

ngham — G. Cassidy, 1 1 3, Oxford 






Road, Acocks Green , I -iinningham 27. 

, Hewitt, 13, Barra- 



ADFORD 




clough Buildings, Greengates, Brad- 



ford. 







tADFORD 



G 



Spurr, 



45, 



Ryan 



Street, West Bowling, Bradford. 

Bury St. Edmunds — -M. D. Forster, 2, 



Crown Street. 




St, Edmunds. 



Paymaster Captain w. H. coomber, k..\. (retired* lias been Cnairtnan oi tae 
Bedford School Branch No. 310 since its incorporation in July 1936. The 
Branch has an unusually extensive and Interesting track, well provided with 



Cowley — Capt. D. E. Rowe, 4, The 

Avenue, Cowley, Middlesex. 
Enfield — T. H. Pettifer, 31, 




Lane, Forty Hill, Enfield. 



exhibited models at the St. Stephen's 



iSaltash) Branch Kxhtbition. A Lantern 

Lecture on "York Railway Museum" was 
greatly enjoyed, the slides for this purpose 
being kindly loaned by the L.N.E.R. A new 
permanent track is being constructed 



accessories, on which timetable opera lions are carried out 



Halifax 




without interruption to operations on the 
temporary tracks. 




K*nm 




1 1 re 




made in which two trains are run simul- 
taneously on the same length of track. 



Secretary: R. G. Symons, 8, Glendower 



Road . 




PI v mouth. 



West Haddon District.— Construe- 



tional work has been 



commenced on 




L.M.S. "Rugby" Station on the Branch 

layout, and it is hoped that running to 

will commence shortly. 





L.M.S. and L.N.E.R, Sections have decided 

to electrify their tracks. This is to be done in 
sections. More stations are to be built, and a 



lift 



lin-l-t- 



is being constructed on the 



suitable for different seasons. Good use is 

made of Meccano Dinky Toys and Pave- 
ment Sets, and the running of buses to fit 

in with train services is a great attraction. 

Great interest was shown in a model of the 
world s largest lorry, which was constructed 
bv one of the members. A scheme for 
electrification is being considered. Secre- 
tary; R. A, Agascar, "Woodleigh," 
Dolcliffe Road, Mexborough, Yorks. 

St. Andrew's (Montpelier). — Members 
have had busy times in the marshalling 





yard and on the main and suburban 
passenger lines. Timetable operations now 
proceed normally, and are bein^ ext 
as the track is enlarged. Film Shows 
are given every month. A visit to the 
Central Fire Station has 




* * 



ngs, 



K. 

Mon 




been arranged. 
Bartlett, 33, Bath 
Bristol 6. 



G. Hclliwcll, 202, 

Halifax. 
Ilfracombe — E. Read win, 29, Greenclose 

Road, Ilfracombe. 
Isleworth — D. Manser, 24, Elmer Gar- 









Keighley 




N. Birt whistle, 9, Bronte 



Street, Keighley, Yorks. 

. Briggs, 




22, 

Headingley, Leeds, 6 




Langdale 



Manchester — N. Luckman, 12, Mossbray 

sway, Levenshulme, Man- 




Chester 

Romford 




Marais, 



31, 




orth 



Avenue, Harold Park, Romford, Essex. 
Stockport — T. Holland, 23, Kilburn Road, 



Edg 




f 







Branch Recently Incorporated 

340. Thornton Heath — Mr. W. T. Jaques, 

5, Ingram Road, Thornton Heath, 



Surrey. 






THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






• 




□□□□□□□□□□n 



□ 

□ 

□ 

n 




□ 





pnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnaannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnanann 



annannnnnnn 



D 







a 




Jain the Hornby Rail- 

-pav Company ami 

become eligible for 

the competitions an- 
nounced on ihis page. 



□ 

D 
D 

a 
a 

a 





a 

a 
a 
a 

D 




□ 
□ 

a 
□ 

□□□□□□□□□□D 

Competitions dealin 







□ 





□ 




J ox « the Hornby Rail- 

Company and 
cli 



pnnnnnnnnn A NOVEL NAME contest nnnDDDDann 



* ihlt 

eompe 
nou need on this page. 



f"~| become 




for 

an- 




Wl 




the names of locomotives. 










Names 




si" in the 



famous trains and stations have always been 

~ar with members, and for this month we 
devised one of a novel type. The panel in the centre of 
the page contains 16 short sentences or phrases that refer 
to names of this 

These the competitors are onanDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnnDnnnn 

Jt LJ ft 

asked to find, using the 
phrases in 



□ 
□ 

□ 

D 
D 

□□□□□□□□□CD 

on that line must be stated, and trains must be identified 
completely by adding the names of the places between 

which they run. This information should be summarised 




in a neat list and forwarded in envelopes marked "H.R.C. 



Head- 

Ltd . , 



left-hand 









the same 




as clues in a cross- 

word puzzle. 

As an example of what is 

required we may take the 



first 



of the clues. 



The 



if 



three 







forming 





the engine's name clearly 
suggest 1 

and there cannot be many 

consisting 



names 



engine 

only of these. A little con- 




the knowledge 






names 



that 



all 



H-.lv. {j. 



members possess, will point 

to "E.LJ." tiie name of 
L.M.S. No. 6121 of the 



a 

a 

a 

a 

□ 
n 



n 

n 

□ 

a 

a 

n 

n 

n 

n 
n 

u 
a 




Contest Clues 

1. Three capitals form this engine's name. 

2. Part of the train is blue, but the engine is always green. 

3. A station where trains run in the roof. 

4. Between north and south ; the name includes trees of the forest. 

5. An engine appears to be a Royal possession. 

6. An animal and a building are seen in a station name. 

— 

7. This streamlined locomotive is named after its designer. 

8. A port in the Midlands. 

9. A lion that joined the army. 

10. One black in a class of "reds." 

11. A steam locomotive, yet has no cylinders. 

12. Joint station. Clearly not all-steel. 

13. Cross a river in two ways and get a station. 

14. Cake and marmalade will suggest the name. 

15. Wearer of the red rose. 

16. The name of this place forms part of a ship. 






n 

D 

D 

a 

a 

a 
a 

n 

a 

a 

a 
a 

a 
a 

a 

p 
a 

□ 



a 



quarters, Meccano 
Binns Road, Liverpool 13. 
Before sealing their en- 
velopes competitors should 

e sure that they have 

written their H.R.C, mem- 
numbers on 






The 




w 





be 

into two sections. 



Home and Overseas, and 

prizes 

manufactured by Meccano 







to 



the 



of 21/ 



respective 



15/ 



and 



will be awarded to 

of the three 





10/6 

the 

best solutions in each sec- 
tion. A number of consola- 

tion prizes will also be 



"Royal Scot" class, as the solution. A quick glance over 
the names of other famous engines will show that there 

the first of these 



awarded. In 




case of a 




is no other formed of initials, so 
interesting puzzles is solved. 

In addition to the name, the owning company, class, num- 
ber and wheel arrangement of engines in the list must be 
given. In the case of a station, the company or companies 




tie for any of the prizes, the award will be made to the 

whose entry, in the opinion of the judges, is 
neatest and is presented in the most novel manner. 
The closing date in the Home Section is 30th April, and 
that in the Overseas Section is 30th July. Entries should 

that they do not arrive after the closing 




Railway Photographic Contest 

No. 1 

we commence our annual 




This 
series of Photographic Contests, which will 

. In these 






continue until September 

contests members are given full scope for 

rand enterprise, as they are not 
to special subjects. Instead the 

prizes are offered for the best photographs 
of any railway subjects submitted during 
each month. 

There is no limit to the number of prints 
that competitors mav submit in these 
contests, but no competitor can win more 

one prize in one contest. The only 

condition laid down is that the photographs 
themselves must have been taken by the 
competitors. Development and 
mav be the work of professionals. 

The contest will be divided as usual into 
two sections. Home and Overseas, and the 
prizes to be awarded in each will consist of 
Hornby Train or Meccano products to the 
respective values of 21/-, 15/- and 10/6. 
Any prize-winner who would prefer photo- 
graphic material may choose this instead of 
Meccano products. A number of consolation 
prizes will also be awarded. 




Envelopes containing entries must be 
marked "Photo Contest No. 1," and posted 

Ltd., 



to reach 




uarters at 





Binns Road, Liverpool 13, on or before 

April* The Overseas closing date is 
30th July. 

Competitors in this contest who 
their photographs to be returned if not 
successful in gaining an award, should 
enclose with their entries an addressed 



, COMPETITION RESULTS 



HOME 
Contest."— First 




January 

(30933), Allcstree, Derby. Second: 
53624) "* " "■ 





J. L, Makin 
E. G. Chandler 

Tnng, Herts. Third: L. J. Slater (49094). 
osham, Portsmouth, Hants. Consolation Prizes; K 
Costain (5108), Bolton, Lanes.; B. C. Peart (50953)! 

Hollinwood, Oldham; M. Colson* 

Green, Southampton; D. H. 
Wells Green, Nr, Crewe. 



(30227) , 
Tom kins ox 




. - . . 



(43681), 



envelope 



of 



suitable 



size 



sufficiently 



stamped. It should be noted, however, that 

prize-winning prints become the property 

of Meccano Ltd., and are therefore not 
retu 




January "Locomotive Features Contest."— First- D 

D'Arcy (34560), Padibam, Nr. Burnley. Second* P 

.Mills (31), Kearslev. Nr. lMt»n, Third: f. L. Ma'kis 

(30933), AJIcstree, Derby. Consolation Prizes; F. 
Gheenbask (26666), ChorUon~cum- Hard v, Manchester 
21; P. Zi**KKMA.VN (57091), Enfield, Middlesex. 





e 



OLUTIONS 

November Photograph Voting Contest 

Entries received in tins contest show that 

■ ' ■ 

all the railway photographs reproduced in 
the H.R.C. competition page of th 
November issue of the "M.M" 
strongly to members. No. 1 prov 
most popular, but No. 6 received almost 

and there was strong 

support for each of the others. The actual 
order was as follows: No. I, No. 6, No. 4, 
No. 9, No. 5. No. 2, No. 7, No. 3, No. 8. 




as manv 




OVERSEAS 
October "Drawing Contest,"— First: Jos. M. 

DEMAN-UEI.E (44225), Valletta. .Malta. Second: P. F. 
Smith (5-1173), South Australia, Australia. Third: T. P 
Morris (55944), Southern Rhodesia, South .Africa" 
Consolation Prize: K. R. Cassells (39510), Wellington, 

IN CW /- tr tl I rt H Cl > 



October 



Mis 




Words Contest.' 



— First* J A 
fiNANAnuRAt (33344) Trichiuopoly, S. India. Second! 

S; h EA £\* <3l7 i?L' Sep^y. lndia * T °"-<* i. broug» 

(9112), Bahvyn, k.S, Victoria, Australia. Consolation 

Prizes: S. D. Kurlawalla (28724), Bombay, India; 
Rk£^ K 55 3S59o), Ontario. Canada; W. Carpistkr 

(42a09) t Chnstchurch, New Zealand. 






# 



242 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



- — 






1 




/posticeV 
V Extra / 



10 Canada 



■** 



•t 




** V 



*** 



- f* 



■ *■ 






*»# 



15 
20 

15 

5 
10 

15 

5 Congo 

10 „ 

5 Cuba 
10 .. 
10 China 

15 « •■ 

4 Cayman li. 

5 Cochin 

3 Charkari 

50 Czechoslovakia 



4*1 

«*• 

■ »i 



2d. 

6d. 

6d. 
2d. 

5d. 
8d. 




■ 4 * 



It 



■ »■ 



■A* 



»«■ 
■ •* 

«4a 



4 *ft 



• ft* 



• * » 




* * ■ 



•** 



#4* 



ft** 

««* 
«■« 

* ■* 

* + * 




3 

6d. 

2d, 

d. 

d. 
4d. 

6d. 

2d. 

2d. 

3d. 



10 Chili 
10 Brazil 

15 ( , •*• 

.5 Dominican Rep. 
10 Dantzig 

15 

20 Denmark ... 

10 Dutch Indies 

15 ,. 
10 Egypt 
15 
5 Esthonia 

10 ., 

5 Ecuador 
10 



■ ■* 



■** 



* i* 



#*■ 



f» 



I! 



• ** 



4 i ft 



+ • . 



■ ■# 
* ff * 



*■ ■ 



# # t 



5 Guatemala*.* 

10 
15 



i ft 



• *■ 



ftffl ■ 
# ft 1 



3d. 
2d. 

4d. 
3d. 
2d. 

4d. 
2d. 

3d. 

5d. 

2d. 
4d. 

2d. 

5d. 
2d. 
4d. 
2d. 

4d. 
6d. 








This amazing advertising offer includes Duplicate Album* Perforation Gauge. 100 Titles of Countries, 
Stamps from Philippines, set Bohemia, old Canadians. Swiss, Australians (K.G.), also Metal Watermark 

PN F" 'HI l_ t_ * J 1 * «i* „ * i i j'^ft ■ « i i * a "■• «.*_* j #* ■ * 



Detector. Finally, the beautiful sec of all 



Bridges, 





unused Colonials which include Waterfalls, Maps, 
The whole parcel absolutely free. Just .^end 2d 



postage and request 



approvals* 



LISDURN & TOWNSEND LTD. (Dept. M.M.), LIVERPOOL 




(Stomp collections purchased for prompt cash.) 












J. RUSSELL, 



23. SHANKLIN DRIVE. WESTC LIFF-0N-S EA. 




. British Colonials including Coronations to 

1 ■ ' m* -I ft <m 

applicants tor approvals, sending id* postage. Good 

value* Thornier* 2t f The Avenue* Clayton, Bradford* 





WON 






FUL 



1938 



OFF 





20 NEW ISSUES AND NOVELTIES 

Including ANDORRA (new], Belgium, Canada, Denmark, FRENCH EQUA- 






TORtAL AFRICA (pictorial). GRENADA (King George VI). GREECE (Ball 
vailling scene). Jugo Stavia. IELANTAN (Sultan I.mail). MOZAMBIQUE 
CO. (filraffe), MOROCCO AGENCIES (King George VI. already obsolete). 

Turkey, etc. I will send this collection absolutely free to all stamp 

collectors sending 2d. postage (abroad 4d.]v 



G. P. KEE 



WILLINGDON, EASTBOURNE. ENGLAND 




MANY RARE STAMPS have been found by purchasers 

of The "DIAMOND" Picket, which contains approx. 

1.000 0NS0RTED STAMPS from Convents abroad. 

1 pkt. If 6. 3 pkts. 3/9, 5 okts. 6K Alt post free inland. 

Postage to Colonics 3d. per week extra. S. Africa and 

Foreign 6fl*. extra. Beware of imitations. 

O. NERUSH 




THE FIRST STAMP Ever Issued ! ONE THOUSAND STAMPS 

[British 1840 Penny Black) for P.O. 3/6- It is guaran- 
teed genuine in every respect. Its companion stamp 
(1840* 2d. blue} for a further 5/9 (cat, 17/6)1 Other 
"Classics' 1 which every Collector should have are the 

Cape of Good Hone TriaruTiilars; we offer Id, rose (cat. 

40/-) for 12/6; 4d. blue tear. 15 W for 5/-: and 6d. pale 
lilac (cat. 40/-) at 15K Superb approvals of any 
country against approved English References or 

, Full Lists Frsa. 









APPROVAL 

From which you may select any 100 for 3/-. 




*■ 



A"). 68, TURNPIKE LANE. LONDON, N.B 




Thii selection is nor made up of the very commonest 

varieties, but contains stamps catalogued at If- 

each or more* (I do not sell less than 100,) 

A returnable deposit of £1 is required from overseas 

applicants* 



NORMS & CO, (Dept. M) t Norwood. London. S.E.I 9 



H. HARDY. "Htylantf." Potter Helgham. 




PACKET 





This marvellous packet is offered under cose as an advertisement, 45 different 
stamps each with a ship on It. A regular armada, K0UANG-TCHE0U, new, SENEGAL 
(Canoe), wonderful flotilla of caravel* from DENMARK (complete set), NEW 

CALEDONIA, UKRAINE, a fleet of 7 CHINESE junks usually sold at 10d„ TRINIDAD & TOBAGO. MAURITIUS. KENYA-TAN- 
GANYIKA. NEWFOUNDLAND. U.S.A.. B. GUIANA, set of S. AFRICA. GREECE. POLAND, IND0-CHINA, FRENCH OCEANIA. 
WALLIS & FUTUNA ISLANDS, etc. Price 4id.. postage lid. (abroad 3d. extra). Purchasers of this packet asking 
for approvals receive FREE set of 3 SPAIN (Columbus, each with his ship on it). Senders of addresses of stamp 

collectors receive FREE set of 6 VENEZUELA or 6 PERSIA. 100 BRITISH COLONIALS If-. 20 AIRPOST 6d., 

6 TRIANGULARS 7d.. 50 PERSIA 4/-. 9 POLAND New Pictorials 8d.. VOLUMES OF B.O.P. -tttAP. 



H 




. W ATKINS (M. Dept.), Granville 




BARNET 




•■* 



CORONATION USED 

Jamaica 
Monrserrat 

N. Rhodesia... 

Nyasaland # „ 




f ** 



• ■# 



i * * 



8d. 

9d. 

9d. 
7d, 



. Postage lid. *xtra. 

St, Helena ... ... 9d. 

Seychelles ... „. 1/- 

Swaziland ... ... 9(L 

Virgin Is. ... „, 9d. 







J R. MORRIS, 9. AUDLEY ROAD. FOLKESTONE. KENT 







. USED CORONATIONS 

NIGERIA and GOLD COAST to applicants for Approvals 
(Cofo*.Triang., Airmails, etch from id., sending tid. 

postage* No stamps sent abroad. 
E.F.HtLL(T),37.TEMPLE GARDENS, LONDON. N.W.1 1. 



BARGAIN SQUARE 

Used Coronation Sets. Cayrrvans, Falkfapds, Matte, 9d 
Antigua, Cyprus, Gibraltar, Kenya, Leowards, Newfoundl'd, 10d< 
Bahamas, Barbados, Ba&uto, BechuanalU EL Guiana, Fiji, Gam- 
bia. Monteerrat, SI- Kilts, St. Lucia, Sf, Vincent, lid. Aden. V% 
Mini Jubilees* Hong Kong, VIO; BcKhuanaland, 2'3; Ceylon, 
2'6; Falkfands, Newfoundland, 3'3. All postage e*tra. 

Approvals — Special — Used Coronations, etc, 

8 Recant B.C. Mini New Issues FREE to genuine approval 

applicants, enclosing 2d. postage. 

T. R. HUGHES (P.T.S.), 
'IBIS COTTAGE/ AMERSHAM, BUCKS, 









NUIN 




BARGAIN 




75 Different Foreign and Colonial Stamps selected 
from Collections presented to Hospital* Send 6d. 

and addressed envelope (unstamped] to: 

SECRETARY 
Hospital Hill. Woolwich. LONDON. S.E.18. 




FREE 



110 




STAMPS 




To introduce my approval books of British Colonials, 
priced from id, each less 3d, in the U~ discount, I am pre- 
senting free this excellent packer of stamps, including 
"etc Malay (Tiger),. Australia (Sydney Bridge), 




Krnva And Uganda, Etfypt, etc., etc, and ni;m\ other 

* Stamps to all genuine approval applicants. 







184 



ERIC J. WATTS, 

NORTHAMPTON ROAD, WELLINGBOROUGH. 



BELGIUM Charity Sets. Complete. 8 Princess Josephine 
2f- (4— 6dJ: 8 Queen Astrid with Prince 2/3: 9 Pr. 
Raudouin 3/-: 8 Queen Astrid 2/3: 3 Royal Children 
2/3; RUSSIA, 3 beautiful new Air Mail 9d.: SPANISH 
CIVIL WAR Govt. Issues, 25 dlff. 8d.. 50— 1J6, 100—3/6. 

CORONATIONS: 

First Day Covers. Leeward Is. 2JG; Antigua %\- and 

Mauritius 5/6: 20 diff. used Coronations 2/6, 50—9/-. 

100—30/-. 150—50/-. 200— £5. All Postage Extra. 

WINDSOR STAMP CO. 



(DEPT. M). 59, LEE ROAD. BLACKHEATH. S.E.3. 



Stamp collector, arc offered a unique opportunity of 

adding to and improving their collections — approval 

books containing 1,000 stamps will be sent to approved 

applicants^ — stamps catalogued to 3d. each at 5/- pet 
100 — better >tamp» in proportion. Fine Colonial 

mint sets at I /3rd cat. collections of many countries 



DUPLICATES, 54 



offered at l/6th. 



A tin box found in an attic- 

*vory conceivtibte kind of stamp, many of 

great value! The owner— not a dealer— decides to dispose of them 
in 5'* bags— absolutetv untouched and wirhout being sorted. Ybtt 
may be .ortunafe enough to make a really good find We know that 
included are such well-known siamps as Cape Triangulan and 
Pence Ceyions, also other rare specimens. The whole valuable 
collection to be broken up and sold in parcels of 5'-, Every lot 
guaranteed good value, wiih a chance that you may find some 
exceedingly valuable specimens. Qivcn Free with every order, 
Kfimax Drop -Act ion Pencil, rolfed gold. Money refunded it not 
completely satisfied. Take immediate advantage of this unusual 
offer by sending Cheque or P.CX 5'3 (including 3d. postage and 

packing). 

R.D*M.G. POSTAL DISTRIBUTORS, 
Dept. M.M., 180, Upper High Stroot, Guildford. 




Downs. ALTRINCHAM. Ghes. 



FREE, 50 stamps uud pictorial $cf to approval 
applicants. Gosling, 21* Fowling Road, Ipswich. 



mm 




AIR MAIL COVER 

Send for my approvals including all the latest 
issues. Purchasers to value of 2/6 will receive 
FREE a Roumanian Charity Stamp* S.G. No, C-32 
teat. 2M. Firit six applicants will also receive ran 
Air Mail Cover* Modern and Air Packets, etc* 

W, SAR6EANT. 

19. West field Park f Newbridge Road, Bath. 



Stamps on approval from Jd. upwards. Good value 

Rosers, 30 f Watling Street, E.C.4, 



given 



BARGAINS FOR 



COLLECTORS 

Colonial and 



Have you seen my Bargains? Larpe 
Foreign stock selling from | to | Gibbons, All gra 

supplied from Id. to £1 each and over* 

FINE ATTRACTIVE SELECTIONS. 

B. MAX CAMPBELL, B.P.A,, P.T.S.. 

1, Haldon Avenue. Teigfimouth. Devon. 





Inmi, 

Chile 



SPANISH CIVIL WAR 






To genuine Applicants for my approvals, I offer free 
5 rare Spanish War Stamps, together with oppor- 
tunities of Obtaining regular free additions to your 

collection. French. 48, Holtickwcod Avenue, N.I 2. 






THREE JUBILEE FREE to applicants for Id. approvals. 
Cox, 14. Broadmcad Av„ Worcester Fark. 



Algeria (Anniversary), 

Barbados, Oceana, CANADA (CORONATION), 
(Columbus). Trans-Jordan and 50 different others, all 
post free for 3d. and in addition all buyers of this 

packet who 
ASK TO SEE MY APPROVAL SHEETS 

receive 5 Pictorial stamps FREE. Palace — Temple — 
Ship — Kraal — Waterfall. Ask for my new approval 
sheets. Great variety and pood discount, Exchange 

desired with all Colonics and Dominions. 

F. 0, R0WE. 69, EDGEH1LL ROAD, BOURNEMOUTH. 






APPROVALS 



«ifi 



ould be 




Even if I did not offer a free gitt it w 
worth writing for my approvals. They largely 
consist of modern pictorial and commemorative 

p mostly in s«5 although priced separately. 
You should write, too, for particulars of my extra 

free gift plan. 

Mention 
Meccano Magazine 






MALAY TIGERS 

Fine set of Federated Malay States in the well 
known Springing Tiger design, including the 
10c. purple on yellow. These twelve stamps, now 
obsolete, arc sent free to all genuine applicants 
for approvals enclosing 2d. postage, (Overseas 4|dJ 







THREEPENNY SETS 

4 Kenya 1935. 4 -Stam, ex-King* 5 Canada 1935. 
4 Canada 1937, including Coronation* 4 Mozam« 
bique 1937 pictorials, unused. 6 Greece 1937 



1937 pictorials, unused, 
pictorials, unused, 3 U*S#A. Army* 3 U*S.A. Navy. 
2 Roumania 1936 Air, All at 3d. each. The lot 

for 2/*. Postage extra. 




D 




ROYDON 



WARE 



PoMaxt 

it Extra 






THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



243 




- 



oys 




THE KING GEORGE 



recent feature of stamp 




COLONIAL ISSUES 




FOR British 
collecting has been the swift succession of colonial issues of 
the new reign. Already many of the colonies have brought com- 
plete series into use. Others have introduced odd values, with 

to follow soon, and in the remainder preparations are 







rapidly approac 




the point of issue. 








the 



Without 
new stamps are gems 
design and printing, 

every collector who 

for themselves will 









;h to possess the complete 









series, me average boy may 
lind it difficult to provide 

funds to buy all the new 
issues immediate) >' they ap- 
pear. That need not cause 
any worry, however. Each of 
the new stamps is intended 
to be permanent, and it will be possible to acquire them gradually 
over a period without fear of missing something, or of having 
to pay an inflated price. 

The Falklands series is probably the best of the new issues so far, 

and some idea of its excellence may be gauged from our 
view that the stamps in it are even better than those 
of the fanu his Falklands Centenary issue of 1933, There 
are 11 stamps in the set with values ranging from £d. 
to £\. We have chosen the id., 2^d, and 6d. issues for 

' ration here but the remainder areequatly attractive. 
The -id. stamp shows a rather curious 'monument, 
consisting of an archway of whales' jaw-bones, which 
stands on the green opposite the Cathedral at Port 







vessel of 324 tons displacement, 

was specially designed to 
carry out experiments in the marking of whales 





The designs for 



\v 



hich 



is specially interesting 



the Id. stamp show the black-necked swan 




n of a bright red 
the rest of its plumage 









nasal knob and a black neck, 

is pure white. It breeds only in the remote parts of the* islands. 

memorial at Port Stanley erected to 







Stanley, 




capital of the Falkland Islands. This 




re 





monument is symbolic of the great whaling enterprise 
centred on the dependency of South Georgia. Whaling 
is the colony's most important industry and no less than 
2,364 whales were caught in 1933, the last year for 

complete figures are available. The 2£d. stamp 

next most important occupation in the 
islands, sheep farming. In 1935 there were 615,000 sheep in the 
islands, the total area devoted to the industry being 2,875,500 

acres. The annual output of wool exceeds 4,000,000 lb. 

The design of the 6d. stamp is probably the most interesting of 
the series. It shows the famous Royal Research Ship "Discovery //," 
built in Glasgow in 1930 for the study of the habits of whales and 




The 2d. 

commemorate" the battle of Falkland Islands, fought on 8th 

under Graf von Spee 

British under the command 




icember, 1914, in which a 

was destroyed 
of Sir Doveton 






The 4d. stamp depicts the upland goose, which is used 
extensively as food in the Islands. The species is rather 
smaller than the British domestic goose. It has the 
striking peculiarity that the male bird is coloured black 
and white and the female brown and white, whereas the 
male and female of other geese are of the same colour. 
The curiously-named "Mount Sugar Top" is shown on 
the Is. valne. This mountain is situated near Grytviken. 
South Georgia, the oldest whaling station in the 

and derives its nickname from its perpetual 
cap of ice and snow, which gives it the appearance 




of 




coated with 



sugar 



lem 





The higher values, 2s. 6d., 5s., 10s. and £1, show 

ely a group of Gentoo penguins, a sealion , the 




beautiful Deception Island and the 
arms of the colony. Deception Island is 
specially interesting to stamp collectors 

for the 'fact that its post office is the 
most southerly in the world. 

The Seychelles George VI issue is 

set. This consists 





maximum cruising range of about 1 0,000 m iles. The 9d. stamp shows 
the older R.R.S. "William Scoresby," which also is the property of 
the Government of the Falkland islands. This ship was a smaller 






three 




r very 

of a full range of 15 values, sharing the 

designs 

simple "photographic" 

superimposed 

as 



here. The 

with 




the 






designs, 



portrait of 





nc. 



, . onl y embellishment, provide an unusually 

pleasing note that is novel in British Colonials. The 2c, 9 C ;, 

50c. and 1 r. 50 values show the coco-de-mer palm 
tree, a curious tree that produces for its fruit a unique double 

c"V« T" "V approximately 40 1b. The important 
Seychelles tortoise -shell industry provides the design for the 
3c., 12c, 30c, 75c and 2 r. 25c values, which have on them a 
picture of the big land tortoise that is found on the island of 
Aldabra. The third design, on the 6c, 20c, 45c, 1 r. and 5 r 
stamps, ■* ***■'- * 



weighing 



snows the famous pirogue, an open -decked boat 
commonly used among the islands for fishing. 

The Seychelles Islands— there are 92 of them in all— lie in 

the Indian Ocean just south of the (Continued on page 245) 






244 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



THREE 




STAMP 




CORONATION 








u probably have unused "Coronations, 



*> 



but 



have you gotthemused'They'rescarcer this way. Here 

are two special offers of USED ''CORONATIONS": 



Pack 







A 100 

different Kins George VI 



Packet A 97 

20 different King 



Coronation stamps 




/ 



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ge V 

Coronation i 





f 




o 











Packet A 99 

100 ALL DIFFERENT EMPIRE PICTORIALS 



and unused. The finest Empire Packet of 

■ 



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its kind yet offered. Including Silver 



Jubilees 



and 




ttons. 



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Ask for our FREE 52-page 




of SET BARGAINS 




o 



STANLEY GIBBONS LTD 



♦ 






DEPT. S.15, 391 STRAND, LONDON, W.C.2 



- 






You may see or listen-in to the Boat Race on April 2nd. but you must 
obtain our wonderful APRIL FREE GIFT consisting of many newly issued 
stamps together with many very old issue?. It contains a special rare 
SHANGHAI stamp (showing the Union Jack and Hags of eleven other Powers]; 
HOLLAND (Wilhclmina); new EGYPT (newly crowned King Farouk); scarce 
obsolete SAMOA (Express); new pictorial JAPAN (Rice Harvesting); beauti- 
ful AUSTRALIA [II* Lyre Stamp]; new HUNGARY (St. Stephen): AUSTRIA 
(Peasants]; GREECE (Bull Fight]; GERMANY (Eagle); ITALY (Julius Cunr). 
These are only some of the stamps included in this generous April Gift 
which will be sent you absolutely FREE by requesting approvals and enclosing 
2d # stamps (abroad 6dJ We will also send you in addition a Perforation 

Gauge and Rule Free. 

WINDSOR STAMP CO, (Dcpt. M), 59, LIE ROAD, DLACKHCATH, S.E.3. 



FREE! EXHIBITION PACKET 



containing 50 different stamps. 

including ANTWERP 1894 and 

etc., 250 mounts, duplicate book, 

perforation gauge. Request approvals. Enclose 2d. postage. No approvals 

sent abroad, A. R. DICKIE (Dept. M). 23. Winscombe Crescent, Ealing. W.5. 



BRUSS 




189G EXHIBITIONS 













Box 3 

8 r 6 



cm*u smy 



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and discover/. Every set of Lott's Chemistry is complete with chemicals, 
apparatus and Books of Experiments written by a Doctor of Science and 
fully illustrated. Start this fascinating hobby NOW and be a real scientist. 

Prices: 3'6, 5'-, 8'6, 12'*, 21'- up to 105'-. 



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SPARES LIST. It's FREE on request. It shows 





equipment with which you can 




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scope 




your experiments. Real Chemical 



Apparatus — no make-believe. 



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the makers of LOTT'S 



Lott s Chemistry Sets are 

BRICKS, LODOMO, TUDOR BLOCKS and BUILDEC, real stone 
building sets that cost anything from 1'6 to 30'-. Ask your Toy Dealer for 
full particulars, or write to us (Dept. MM) for illustrated list of all products, 

Id. stamp on p.c, 1£d. stamp on letters, please. 




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UNUSUAL 

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Stamps on paper, etc.* just as received from Convents, Missions, Banks, etc. 
Guaranteed unpicked. Chance of a FIND in everv tot. Send to-day for your 
treasure hunt to-morrow. 3 for 4/3, 6 for 8J-. Abroad, extra postage. FREE! 
25 Br. Cols, including CORONATIONS, to Approval applicants. Also FREE 

EXCHANGE. Enclose ptge. Overseas 3d. Dealers Supplied. 



ASTLEY & CO. (M.2), NEWBOLDS, WOLVERHAMPTON 




KINCSMILL STAMP CLUB 

Do yau belong to a stamp club? No? Here is your great chance* 

There is NO entrance itc t and NO subscription to the KINCSMILL STAMP CLUB, 
but there are many advantages, including a free packet of attractive stamps every 

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is catered for* whether you are a beginner, medium, or advanced* Apply for 

membership now, sending lid- stamp to: 

G. KINGSMILL (D.W.E.C, S.T.P.JL). Dept. M.M.. NEW BARNET, HERTS. 





EW 




We offer a mint set of 4 of the wonderful new sct f one stamp showing the 

fortress thai ranks as a Man-of-War at the Admiralty, another showing 
possibly the oldest Neolithic Monument in the world, for only 6d. post free 
to all serious applicants for our Famous Westminster Blue Books containing 

Pictorials, Jubilees, Coronations, stamps you will be proud to own. 

BANK CHAMBERS, 
■ 32a, STRAND, LONDON, W.C.2. 



WESTMINSTER STAMP CO 




GOLDMINE PACKETS* 1 .000 assorted stamps from 
banks* mission*, etc,, abroad 1(6. J. D B Covvic, 35 * 
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and Id 



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ar*a la. approvals* Many excellent bargains* Good 
discount, ) # Norris, Chi 



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PACKET FREE!! 

This large free Rife parcel contains 509 UNSORTED 
FOREIGN STAMPS, many scarce from MALTA (K.G.VI 
new issue Pictorial), AUSTRALIA (K,G. VI new issue), 
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Scene). NEW ZEALAND K.G. V), etc., etc. ALL FREE!! 
Just send Id. poscnec and request my FAMOUS EXTRA- 
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Jamaica, Ceylon, Niger, etc, Brit, CoL cat. 2/6, 

ere Over 200 Stamps, all different. 









This splendid collection for 6d. only, to appli- 
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Id. Advanced selections also available at 2d, 

upwards per stamp. 

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4. U.S.A. 1936. Set of 6 Army and Navy. 

Any ONE of the above gifts to applicants requesting 
my low-priced approvals containing stamps from id. 
Liberal discount is also wiven. Let me know your 

wants, and send 2d, for postage. 

C. A. RUSH. B.P.A..J.P.S.. P.T.S;, 
38, Oueen's Avenue. Whetstone. N.20. 




THE WONDER PACKET. 



Bargains, 



Ask for my approval sheets and new list«i and enclose .lid. postage and I will send you the 

following packet absolutely FREE— SO FINE STAMPS including new IVORY COAST, a handsome 

stamp, two CORONATION COLONIALS. BRAZIL airpost (curious looking stamp), GREEK. Red Cross, DENMARK (SILVER JUBILEE), 2 new POLISH 

Pictorials (fine), 2 NEW ZEALAND (Zoological Pictorials, new). PALESTINE, etc STAMP BARGAINS. W Persia 3d.. 10 Peru ki.. 100 different British 

Colonials 1I-, 6 Triangular 7d„ 1,000 different 3111. 45 Coronation (one from each Crown Colony! 5/-. 20 Brazil lOd. My new large list of 700 

ost free lid. Send addresses of stamp-collecting friends and receive 6 Venezuela or 3 Ichang. H. C. WATKINS (M. Deot.). 6RANV1LLE ROAD. BARNET. 



U*K' 






. 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 






245 




tamp Collect! ng — (Co*/, from page 243) 



equator. Their total land area is only slightly more than 1,500 

square miles, but the administrative area is a big one. The outlying 

Aldabra group is 680 miles 
south west of the chief island 
Matte, on which stands the 




capital Victoria. 



Bri 



V k • 





also in- 



cludes a palm tree among the 




of its 



three 



new 



stamps. This is the Cohune 
palm shown on the 3c. stamp, 



illustrated here. 



The 



tree 



grows wild on the marshland 
lying inland, and bears a nut 
that is rich in oil but difficult 
to crush, a point that has so far prevented extensive commercial 
development The 4c. stamp also has a most attractive design, the 









designs are as follows: 





ish 




3i re 




into the picture. The rem 
H.M.S. St. Angelo, the only 

rank as a man-of-war; 








(illustrated), Verdata Palace; IJd., a neolithic hypogeum, or under- 
ground chamber, a unitpie monument reputed to date 





B.C.; 



d., the 




to 
of Victoria Gozo, 2Jd., the Grand 



Master de L'Isle Adam, the first of 

the Grand Masters of the Order of St. 






John to rule in Malta, entering Mdina; 



3d 



St 



ventual 







John; 



Grand 




Co-Cathedral, 
of the 










con 



of 




Mnajdra temple; 
Manoel De Vilhena; Is. 



or 



the 



King's head being flanked by streamered panels showing the names 
and specimens of important local products. Reading down the left- 



hand parn:) the first item is 




e, the basis of most chewing gums 



followed by grape-fruit, bananas and sugar. In the i -iglit-hand panel 



the references are to mahogany 




coconuts, cohune 



(illustrated) Maltese girl wearin 
ialdetta, a combined hood and cape 

traditional in Malta; Is. 6d., St. Publius, 
the first Bishop of Malta, mentioned 
in Acts xxviii; 2s., Mdina; 2s. 6d., a view 
the Harbour with the famous bronze 

une iii the foreground; 








statue of 

5s., Palace Square, showing on 
right the Governor's Palace, form 
the Palace of the Grand Masters; 10s 





nuts and rice. 



uras is ra 





grape-fruit industry of British 



growing, and it is fitting that 




5c. value should show a group of fruit trees with natives 
picking fruit. 

Bermuda issued five new stamps in January, and 

J_ *J -* * 

these are worthy specimens. The Id. and 2 Ad. values are 

_ ■ ■ ■ M ■ 




reproduced here. The design of the Id. stamp is 

and shows an old-time four- 

liner in 






also for the lid. 

masted sailing ship and a mo 

Harbour. The 2 id. and Is. values show a view of the 

Great Bay. This is one of the designs retained from a 



previous issue, the only alteration being the substitution 
of the portrait of King George VI for " " ' 





of 
George V. The 3d. value depicts St. David's lighthouse, 
the first landmark visible to travellers approaching 
Bermuda from the east. 

Ceylon has issued nine of its ne^v 
from these we have chosen the 





Paul, the story of whose 
shipwreck and sojourn at Malta is told in Acts xxvii 
and xxviii. The stamps are much larger than previous 
Maltese issues, and the series is an unusually attrac- 
tive one. 

Cook Islands is to issue three new stamps 
at the end of this month. These will consist of a Is. 
value, showing a three-quarter head and shoulders 
portrait of King George VI, set in a framing of Maori 
carving; 2s., depicting a typical native village scene; 
and 3s., a coastal scene with a native outrigger canoe. 

values will be issued 



The 



same designs and 



in the 



Niue Islands simultaneously, the only • difference 
being that they will be inscribed "Niue-Cook Islands" 
and that minor alterations will be made to the framing 

of the 2s. stamp. 

Montscrrat, one of five presidencies constitu 
the Leeward Islands, also is to issue a new series with 




■ 








portrait of the King in 



i!hHtr.jt!on here. This shows an « xc< pii. .ually 

fine picture of Sigiriya, or the Lion Rock, one of 

the most romantic spots in the history of Ceylon. 

It derives its name from a series of carved 

of lions on the rock walls, 400 ft. in height, that 





hound the spiral path leading to the top of the 



m #■ •" 



rock. An artificial lake at its foot is set in forests 
of excepti 






more than 1 ,400 
years ago the*rock was a fortress that was almost 
unassailable. Great rooms, staircases and galleries 



were hewn out of 




e rock and adorned with 




a 

hand corner and the 



badge 




left 

ency 
and 



in the top right corner. The 
5s. values will show a view of Carr's Bay; the 
Id., lid., and 2.|d. values, a cotton field; and 
the 2d., 6d., 

Gardens. 





6d. value a view of th< Botanic 

— 




for the 




5 



St, Lucia will issue a single 
fd. to 3d. values showing a portrait of the 

in the centre, with a framing of roses and fieurs 
de its, surmounted by a crown. There will also 

be 



a 10s. issue with a design consisting of the 

surmounted by a crown 



sculptures, carvings and 




of remarkable brilliance that 



badge of the 



are still to be seen in almost pristine glory. 



The 2r. 




depicts a 




stone, a carved 




found 



at the entrances of most of the ancient temples of Ceylon, fre- 



quently on the first of a 

ancient got 





of steps. The carvings commonly 

presumably, watched over the 










cypher 



imposed on a background of the ira 

Nearer home, tri 

*" the following designs: Jd., 
3d,, views of the Rock from different 
of the Hd. stamp is the same as in the previous issue, the only 



five new stamps 

s Head; Id., l|d., 2d. and 

viewpoints. The design 



glories of the 



t> 




The 






remaining 




bear the same 

V 





of this series 

as in the 



series . 






that the 




gs 




is moved from the right 



differences being the substitution of the 
new King's portrait and the 

of the words 



The 9c. stamp 
as it has become 




omission 




am! revenue. 
withdrawn, 
reduncl.itit valu 



top corner and the badge of the colony from 
the left to the right corner. This new arrangement of the head 
and badge applies in each, of the stamps. 

We wonder how many readers have observed an important 
omission from the designs reproduced this month, except those 
for Bermuda, The hitherto * »•*-*-•*- -• --^—- ..«__,- « 

or "Postage and Revenue" 



inevitable inscriptions "Postage 
have disappeared. Their omission 



in consequence of the introduction 
of the "all-up" air mail service at the 

end of February, The 3c. and He. values 
will now serve 

when a 



postal 





occasions 



of 9- 





be paid. 

British Guiana has issued seven 



new stamps. Except for the 4c. 




which shows a simple 



map of the South American Continent with the country marked 



in black, the 




are preciselv as in the 




issue, exee 

■ 





for the substitution of the portrait of King George VI. 

Malta has issued its complete new series of 15 values, ranging 
from Jd. to 10s, in denomination, of which three are 
here. The |d. value gives a charming panoramic view of the 
Grand Harbour. A specially interesting point in this stamp is the 

omission of the King's portrait and the inclusion of the Royal 
Cypher. The reason is that the stamp is in a miniature format 
and the King's portrait could not have been included on a reasonable 











no significance was attached to the point. 



from 

stamps last year was noted, but 

It seems obvious 



now, however, that a new 




cy has been adapted. 



We thank Stanley Gibbons Ltd. for their courtesy in loaning the stamps from which 



the illustrations 4 or our stamp pages have been made 



* 



246 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 





GOLFWORDS 



CLUES 
HOLE No. 1 

Strange 
Selfish new 

Knock 

Awful 

Offering 

HOLE No. 2 

Move round 

HOLE No, 3 
Proportion 
Poison 

HOLE No. 4 

Created 

Regulate 

Small portion 
Standard 

HOLE No. 5 
Bitter 
Undulating 

HOLE No. 6 

Colour 

HOLE No. 7 




CLUES 
No. 10 

Reprimand 
Frame of steps 
Croup of stars 

HOLE No. U 

Greeted 

■ 

HOLE No. 12 

Juicy fruits 

Magnificence 
Measure 



HOLE No, 13 

Rope-walker 
Field h 





unit 




Faithlessness 






HOLE No. 8 
Music 
Boundary 

HOLE No. 9 
Nickname 



HOLE No. 14 

Mysterious 

HOLE No. 15 

Obstinate 

HOLE No. 16 

Symbol 
Dismissal 

Devastate 

HOLE No. 17 
Govern 

HOLE No. 18 

Separate 
Nearly correct 
Tdl 




sword 



Our readers so greatly enjoy "M.M." 
Puzzles that this month we are setting them a novel 
form of word puzzle developed from them. To this 



we 




given the name "Golf words. 




The illustration on this page represents an 18-hole 

course. The tees are suggested by lettered 
diamonds, the greens by numbered circles, and the ' 
fairways by dotted lines passing through squares. 
The idea of the contest is to start in the top left hand 
corner, and to go round the course by filling in the 
squares with the letters of words to be found from the accompanying 
clues. The competitor who goes round in the smallest number 

of complete words is the winner. 

first word for any hole must start with the letter indicated on 
the tee. Some holes are short, and may be done in one word, but 
others may require two or more. Only words derived from the 
given clues may be used, and the letters marked in certain squares 
must be used in the words passing over them. 

In order to make the idea clear, let us take the short Hole No, 15. 

indicates that there is only one word. This must start with 
P," and the seventh letter is required to be "S." The 









*• 



word "Perverse" fits this, and therefore is the solution. 

Where several clues are given to a hole, the words they lead to 
may be used in any order, but may not all be wanted. Thus for 
Hole No. 13 there are three clues, which suggests that the hole can 



be done either in three or two words, or perhaps in one. With the 
letters indicated as guides, the - 1 — "—•---" ,_____*,_._,- 



clue 



be "Ambulance." Between them these words have the necessary 12" 
letters, so that the hole can be done in two "strokes." But there is a 

third clue. This is a hint that the hole might be done in one word, and 
a little search will lead to the better solution "Funambulator." 

When the course has been completed competitors should add up 
the number of words taken, and mark that number in the top right 
corner of their entries. Prizes of Meccano products value 21/-, 15/-, 
10/6 and 5/- respectively, will be awarded to the senders of t he- 
four best entries in order of merit, and there will be a number of 

prizes. In the event of a tie for any prize, preference 

will be given to the neatest or most novel arrangement. 

Readers who do not wish to cut up their Magazines may make a 
copy of the "golf course" illustrated on this page, or may even 

submit a numbered list of words used. 



u>n 




sugg 




gaiety 



im 



Fun" as one of the words, and "field hospital unit" must 









Entries should be addressed "Golfwords," Meccano 

13, and must reach this office not later than 
There will be a separate section for Overseas readers- 
with similar prizes. Overseas entries must arrive by 30th July. 



The 1938 Photographic Contests 



This month we announce the first of our 
1938 series of photographic competitions, 
which will continue until September at 



and that the print must bear a title. The 





ing and 




may have been 



least. The same easy conditions as in pre- 

years will apply throughout. Each 
month prizes will be offered for the best 



vious 



done professionally, but entrants who have 

done this part of the work themselves are 

asked to write the words "own work 
throughout" on the backs of their entries. 
In. the event of a tie for any prize, prefer 




photographs submitted during the month, ence will be given to a print that is solely 

without any restrictions as to the subject the work of the competitor. 

or the size of the picture, or the make of Each month's entries will be divided into 

camera, plate, film or printing paper. The | two sections, A for readers aged 16 an 

over, B for those under 16, and prizes of 
Meccano products or photographic materi- 







sure 



only requirements are that the 

must have been made by the competitor, 




as chosen bv the winners, to the value- 
of 21/- and 10/6 will be awarded in each 
section. There will be a number of con- 

i 

solation prizes in addition. 

^n tries to this month's competition 





should be addressed "April Photo 
Meccano Magazine, Bums Road, Liverpool 

13," and must reach this office not later 
than 30th April 

There will be separate sections, with; 



prizes of the same val ues, open to Overseas 
readers. Overseas entries must arrive 



not later than 30th July, 









THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



247 




A MOVABLE FEAST 



*» 



*-■ T 



■ "* m 



Tommy Iotis meandering homeward much later than 
his usual suppertime* A friend of the family who 
happened to meet him said: 

"'Why, Tommy, aren't you afraid you will be late 
for supper?" 

"No," replied Tommy, "I've got the food,'* 

t * * * 

Farm Labourer: "Ah, no, there be no money in 
farming these days. Now look at that horse. You 
wouldn't believe the amount he eats. 1 * 

lourist: "What f s he kept for?" 

Farm Labourer: "Farmer has to have him for 
cutting the hay/ 1 

Tourist: "Hay for what?" 

Farm Labourer: "Why, for his feed, of course." 



Convict No- 123: "It's no good taking any notice of 

those advertising slogans. I followed the advice of one, 
and here I am." 

Convict No. 321: "Which one was it?" 

Convict No. 123: "Make money at home,* 1 

• • * « 

First Motorist: "Have you tried that new atomiser 
which they sav reduces vour petrol consumption 

by half?" 

Second Motorist: "Rather. It saved 50 per cent, of 
my petrol. Then I bought a new carburetter, that 

saved 30 per cent,, got another brand of petrol that 
saved 20 per cent., and some special sparking plugs 
which saved another 10 per cent. I then took out the 
car for a test run and, believe me, the petrol tank 
was overflowing before I'd gone five miles!" 



* 



• 



"Jones has got the softest job in town." 
"What does he do?" 

"He's a tester in a feather-bed factory, 

* # • * 



ii 



t 






Doctor. "Was the sleeping powder effective? 1 
Patient: "No. I scattered it over the whole 
but it did no good." 



bed 



- 



Bobbie: "Mother, may I have a penny for the old 
man who is crying outside?" 

Mother. "Yes, dmr, but what is the old man crying 
about?" 

Bobbie; "He's crying * Peanuts, a penny a bag 1 ;" 

* • * * 

Tim: "Why are an engine and an elephant alike?" 
~ " : "I don't know." 




Tim: "Because they both have ears," 
Buck: "An engine doesn't have an ear-* 1 
Tim: "Of course, haven't you ever heard of an 
engineer?" 

m * * ♦ 

GOING OR COMING BACK? 




Old Lady: "Guard, will you help me off the train?" 

Guard: "Sup " 

Old Lady: "You see I'm so stout I have to get off 
backward. The porters think I'm getting or, and 
shove me in again. I'm five stations past my des- 
tination already." 






TLLOTINATING 

Customer; "Anv four-volt two-watt lamps?" 
Electrician: "For what?" 

r: "No, two." 
Electrician: "Two what?" 

Customer "Yes." 

* * * • 




Levy: "Give me a penny to see the sea serpent/ 1 
Isaac: "Don't be yasteful, my boy. Here's a mag- 



nifying glass. Go and find a vorraP 

* * 



A, SHOCK COMING! 






lull i.i 111.11a I i Mr ii kii i ■■ ■■|IM«Ihv 



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Burglan '-Shine yer light a little higher, Bill!" 



* 



* 



* 



ii 






Rude Youth: 41 Do vou sell dog biscuits in this 

rotten little shop? lp 

Assistant: **Yes, sir, Will you eat them here, or shall 

I send them round to vour'tennel?* 1 

* • « • 

"I say, waiter, the flowers on this table are artificial, 
aren't they?" 

Yes, sir. That's the worst of running a vegetarian 
restaurant— if we use real flowers, tbe customers 

eat Ihein." 

* • • » 

A customer sent this note to his grocer: "Please send 
six dozen eggs; it rooc^ I will send cheque. " 

The grocer replied: "Send rli^que; if good, I will 

send six dozen fgRS. M 

* * • # 

The prison chaplain was paying his weekly visit to 
the convicts* In one cell he found a man looking very 




M What's the matter?" he asked sympathetically. 
**Bad news from home t sir* 

» 



j Tm sorry to hear that. What's the matter?' 
"It's me brother, sir. He's gone into the workhouse f 
the first of our family to disgrace us." 

+ * * * 

"What is the difference betw* en an oak tree and a 
tisjht -fitting shoe?" 
"I'll buy it," 

"One makes acorns, and the other makes corns 

achel" 

* * * * 



Tom: "Why is the church bell more obedient than 



i 



the 




' * 




«vn: "The bell sound- when it*S told, but the organ 

says TU be Mowed first 1 . 

# • * * 



■ • 



Teach* r: "Can 



a you give nn> .1 sentence with the word 
-loquacious in it?" 

Charlie: "Yes. My Sister was run over by a motor car 

-because she didn't loquacious going," 

• » • # 

Bus Inspector: "Are vou aware that none of the 
passengers on the top deck has a ticket?" 




Now Conductor: "Bless my soul! That's what comes 
of living in a bungalow," 

• # * * 

THIS MONTH'S HOWLER 

The three highest mountains in Scotland are Ben 
Nevis. Ben Lomond and Ben Jonsbn. 






LOST IN THE VOID 

Albert: "Yes, the bullet struck my head and went 

into space." 

Cecil: "How terrible! Did they get it out?" 

• • • • 




Mi: "My brother had a big scare yesterday, A lizard 

ran up his stocking," 

Bert; "That's nothing, my brother had the sewing* 

machine run up the seam of his pants*" 

* 9 * * 

"You can't stop here/ 1 protested the policeman 

to tbe motorist whose car stopped at the street junction. 



You don't know this car," replied tbe owner 



with a sad smile. 



• 



• 






14 



"Did that crate of chickens reach you safely?" 

"Well > yes, but you didn't pack 'em* properly* After 

searching the neighbourhood I only found 12," 

You did pretty well* I only sent eight." 

# * * • 

"And what are you ^oing to be when vou grow 
up, Freddy?" 

"I'm going to be a philanthropist: those people 
always seem to have such a lot of inonev." 

m m m m 






* 









- 

Hostess: "Are you sure you won't have another 
slice of cake, Tommy?" 

Tommy (politely}: "No f thank you* Til be having 

a proper tea when I get home/ 1 

* * . * ♦ 

"Is ink very expensive, father?" 

Why, no, what makes you think so?" 
^ Well, mother seems quite disturbed because I 

spilled some on the hall carpet." 

* • * » 



11 
it 






■ 1 




husband 



Lady in Post Office: "I want a wireless licence," 
Clerk: "Yes* what name please? 

Lady: "Oh it hasn't a name, it's one 
made himself." 

* m m ♦ 

■ 

Tommy (at the Zoo): "I wonder what that tiger 
would say if it could speak?" 

Dad; "It would probablv sav *Pardon me t sonny, 
but I am a leopard! 1 " 

"When I looked out of the window, John, I was glad 
to see you playing with Bill "" 

"I wasn't playing with BilL mother. We had a fight, 

and I was helping hirn^to find his teeth/' 



>t 



* 



• 



i 



Lady in Restaurant: "Please bring me some fresh 
oranges with soda water/' 

Chinese Waiter: "Velly sorry, madam, ve have no 
oranges, but plentv krrsonges/' 

• m * * 

Boss (as Jenkins comes in half an hour late): "Late 
again!" 

Jenkins: "So am L" 



• 



* 



EVIDENCE AGAINST HIM 




Village boys, trying to coax Ernie into the pond 
a swim: "Come on, Ernie t the water's grand," 

ue: "Can't. Mother 1 II find out. To-night's 
bath-night/' 



for 







my 



248 




MECCANO MAGAZINE 



11 
















11 






Buy a BASSETT-LOWKE Mo 




e 



an 




et your motto 




e 



w 



on 



time! 



// 



* 




Here is theTORON ATION SCOT" model of the 
ue and silver L.M.S. steam driven world record 





■ • 

reaker which touched 114 m.p.h. on her test run 

1 



last J 



un 



e. The same day she left C 



reweworKS 







to enter service, BASSETT-LOWKE'S had a mode 
of her on view at London Branch 





e 



tail 



model snownnere! 







e same super* 
made throughout. 



This model is available in clockwork, d,c. 8 volts, and 
ax. 20 volts. (Gauge "O".) Price £12.12.0 

Write for Free Booklet of Model Trains, "RAILWAY THRILLS" No. 17 
or big Model Railway Catalogue A.I7, Price- 6d. post free. 




THE LITTLE TRAIN WITH THE BIG PULL 



Here it is again this season and going as 

TWIN TRAIN 



strongly 



as ever-the gauge "OO 



ft 



Newmodels include theContinentat 4-6-2 Pacific with long scalebofliecoaches, 
Mitropa wagons, etc, (which can be lighted up), the rwo-coach Di©s©l Flyer, with 
rhe special feature of tait and headlights changmgcolour as the vehicle reverses. 

Write for TT*17 and see all the models described 








Special features include: the TWIN system of working two trainson one line at different speed 

on Bakefite bases with neat method of snapping together and quickly breaking apart: 



5 




first-class electric motor unit running at ail speeds and easily replaceable. 







BASSETT-LOWKE'S Model Ship Department offers the most extensive range of "true to scale" 
models. They specialise in high-class scale model liners, battleships, racing yachts, and alsc 
tess expensive popular Motor Boats and Yachts from Ign. Also 12'6 set of parts for Model 



Buildings of famous little ships like the "CUTTY SAfcK," etc 









Gee 



* 



S.I 7 



Ship Modal 
Catalogue. 



6d 



poaf 
If 



WB.17 



Booklet of 
Ship Sefs. Free. 





LONDON: 112, High Ho 




orn, 



W.C1 



■ 



■ , # ■ 




/ 




MANCHESTER: 28, Corporation Street 




be made more interest- 

■ ■ 

economical 










booklets 





"How to do your own Developing, 



n 



PRINT 




"How to 
1NG." "How 
ENLARGING, etc. 

A Trial Set of Chemicals for 1 7 7 including: 




1-oz. bottle 



AZOL, 



develop 



ACID-FIXING 



spools 3JX2*. 

■ 

. solut 



Packet 



suffi 



Gaslight Prints 



etters 



JOHNSON 



n 



2 



mists Ltd. Londo 





TOYS OF 

MADE #t^ I IV^^ QUALITY 

As supplied to H.M. Forces for Training Purposes 




GUN 




ASTRA TOYS ARE OBTAINABLE FROM 

GOOD CLASS STORES AND TOY SHOPS 




Write (or latest catalogue, illustrating man/ new 





free 



rom 







e sole manufacturers and patentees 



ASTRA PHAROS LTD. 

r 

Landor Works, Shepherds Bush, London, W.12 



- ■■* 



> 









THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



— 

IX 



m 




DUNLOP 




SUPREMACY 



new Dunlop " Jubilee 



remarkably 
dependability. 

unique 



standard 

Dunlop 



tyremanufacturing experience 

possible. 





TUBE 




C.F.H 




' RH/310 










i 



THE 

ENDEAVOUR 



i 







YACHT 
STILLSAILING 

AHEAD. 





and 



not 
this 

win 






get 




the 







All or the hulls are hand made in best yellow pine. The two largest Yachts 
are fitted with Braine type automatic steering. Cabin Skylight extra. 









































* 




















1 




1 








- 




"Dad and I have some real sport 
with my B.S.A. Air Rifle. We have 




Pri 
17 in. Yacht with automatic rudder 
21 in. Yacht with automatic rudder 




*** 



• # + 



12 



/ 



w 






• *■ 



•■* 






27 in, Yacht with Braine type steering 
36 in. Yacht with Braine type steering 



*•# 



-•# 



■ *■ 



mm m 



18'6 
39'6 
75'- 



Do what I did 

SEND THE COUPON 






. 



SPECIAL OFFER TINPLATE TRACK 

THIS WILL JOIN UP WITH THE HORNBY RAILS 

CLOCKWORK: Straights, 2*d. each; Curved (8 rails to circle), 2£d. 

each; I Straights, 2d. each; £ Curved, 2d. each; Parallel Points, 1'6 



each; Crossovers, 5*- each; + Right-angled 




1 



/ 



each; 



competitions-shooting at the tar- 
get. Sometimes we try shooting at 
a swinging tin and that's real fun 

Dad says the accuracy of the B.S.A. 

is making me a good marksman. 

The B.S.A. Air Rifle is powerful too, 

yet ammunition is quite cheap. I and show Dad 

buy B.S.A. lead pellets at 2'7 a f ne B.S.A 

thousand. You should ask your Dad 
to buy you a B.S.A. Air Rifle." 

No firearms certificate necessary to 
purchase providing the purchaser is over 

. 17 years of age. 







* 



** 



< 



* 



Catalogue." 




B.S.A. 
GUNS LTD. 



• 







* 



92. Armoury Rd. 

Birmingham, 11 
Please senrl details of 










e and Reverse Rail, lOd. each. All prices plus postage 



SEND FOR BOND'S 1938 CATALOGUE. Its 200 pages will interest you. 






BOND'S O' EUSTON ROAD LTD 



Breakdown Model 

(illustrated) 

£2.1 Os. or 



> 



f 



B.S.A. Air Rifles. 



r 



* 



name... ... 



,*»»■•* «*»■■«! 



#il»ttlt»T< ■*• ■■#• 



357, E list on Road, London, N.W.1 




/ 




monthly 






'Phone: EUSton 5441-2 



Est. 1887 



+ 



Address.. ... 



• mm m 



t m * m m * m 4 w *•* + •***-•* m.m.m 



■ ■ ft fe* 



..Ift ft******-*-* 







X 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 












*A 



\ 



. 



1 



1 



i 



L 



• % 



*' 



\Vi 






La 



\ 



V% 



iik 



,+ 



our standard tinplate rails are the acknowledged best of their class, we have felt that in order to do 
justice to the speed and hauling power of our locomotives, especially "PRINCESS ELIZABETH" and E420 "ETON 

steel rail was essential. Our object was to produce the perfect miniature railway track, and we have 
our aim in the new system of electric steel rails and points that we introduced recently. These rails are 
of the very highest quality, yet are sold at reasonable prices. We are confident that they will give satisfaction, 



Many owners of Hornby Railways wrlh tinplat* fails 
will want to add solid steel track to their layouts. To 
enable them to do this special Adapting Pieces are 
available. 

Adapting Pieces, per box of six 






not only to Hornby Train users, but to 



model railway 



enthusiasts. The track is joined up by means of fishplates 
which are supplied with each rail 



* 



c 






tfti 



■ ■ 



I \ 1 






\ 



-9\ 



1*1 



J ■ 



AV 






M 



y i 



m " 



• - V 



\ 






h ■ 



Manufactured 

MECCANO LIMITED 

BINNS ROAD 

LIVERPOOL 






QUALITY FEATURES OF NEW 
ELECTRIC SOLID STEEL TRACK 

RAILS* Solid drawn steel section, zinc 
coated to prevent rust and to ensure 

electrical contact. The space 
required for a circle made up of 10 
Curved rails is 6 ft 8 in. 

SLEEPERS. Pressed steal, of similar 
design to the steel sleepers used on 
actual railways; Each steeper is pierced 
so that the track can be screwed down 
to a wood base* 

POINTS. On solid ba&e. providing th 
greatest possible rigidity. Lever move 
ment simple and positive. Right-hand 
and Left-hand points available, 



EB3 



EA3| 









ELECTRIC STRj 

it) 
Raits ... 



RAILS 



Straight Quarter Rails 



*** 



•** 



*■ V 



*** 



■ *■ 



a#* 



««■ 



Mi 



#» m 



TSR Elecr/ital Terminal for Solid Section 






, 



i*p 



**# 



per 



ELECTRIC CURVED RAILS 

Curved Rails .„ 
Curved Half Rail* 



• •t 



■ ** 



#-t 



«■■ 



ft * ft 



■ • ■ 



^ 



ELECTRIC POINTS. (Hand Op.ratod) 



Right-hand Points 
Leff'hand Points 



••* 



*■* 



i * I 






For ioinina up track 



FISHPLATES 



... 



each 2'8 
., 1'7 



r 



pyp 



oach 2' 8 



... Prtc*. doz, 6d 

- 










GAUGE O, If. 











i 



SERIES. 



Hornby Rails, Points and Crossings are built for hard wear and for 
smooth running. 

There is practically no limit to the nu 



n 

ir of rail formations that 
can be built with them. Their adaptability is well shown in the booklets 

How to Plan your Hornby Railway*' and "Hornby Layouts 

ions," both of which may be obtained from your dealer, price 
3d., or from Meccano Ltd., Binns Road, Liverpool 13, price 4d. 

A SELECTION OF RAILS, POINTS AND 



FOR ELECTRIC TRAINS 



■ ■ - ■ 



li-BI Straight rails ... 
EB* :,* half rails 



11 



EA2i Curved quarter rails 

(2 ft. radius) 
EA2 Curved rails (2 ft, radius 

EPPR2 Parallel points, right- 

hand 



per doz. 6/ 

5/ 









E1>S1 Straight rails, double 
track 



*** 



4 *# 



doz. 



»« % 



ft t V 



EPPL2 Parallel points, left- 




. . . 



. . . 



* ft m 



;.erpair 7/- 



EDSR2 Double symmetrical 
points, right-hand (2 ft. 



radius) 
EDSL2 Double symmetrical 



t:u 



pair 7/ 



These points can be used with 
either 1 ft. or 2 ft. radius track, 

EPR2 Right-hand points 
(2 ft. radius) 

E PL2 Lef t h a nd points 

(2 ft. radius) 

EPRl Right-hand points (1 
ft, radius) 



points, left-hand 

radius) 



(2 ft 



* »T 



-,. 



per pair 8/ 



EDSR1 Double 
points, right 
radius) 



Mill 



etricai 
(1 ft. 



* b# 






*it 



m » ■ 



ICPLl Left-hand points (1 ft 



per paii 6/6 



radius) 

¥ 



EDSL1 Double symmetrical 
points, ]eft*hand (1 ft, 

radiusj 



per pair 7/ 






FOR CLOCKWORK TRAINS 



Bl Straight rails . per do«. 4/- 

Al Curved rails (1 ft. radius) „ „ 4/- 

PR1 Right-hand points (I ft.l 

PL1 Left-hand points (1 ft, f"^ r pair 3/6 
radius) ... ... ...J 



C A2 A cu te-angle crossings 
(for 2 ft. radius track) ... 



each 



" 



i 



■** - 



PPR2 Parallel points, right-^ 

hand 

PPL2 Parallel poLnts t left- 
hand 



« -« » 



*« * 



per pair 4/ 






PR2 Right-hand points (2 ft.") 

radius) ... ... ... I 



PL2 Left-hand points (2 ft, |"P* r P 3 * 3 / 6 



These points can be used for 
either 1 ft, or 2 ft. radius track. 

DC2 Curved rafls t double 



radius) 



track, 2 ft, radius only 



m m -ft 



| doz> 



Ask your dealer for an illustrated price list. 



MECCANO LIMITED, Binns Road, 












& 



PR2 



-■l 






CA2 



PPR2 



a ■ 



DC2 



■r 






THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



XI 







I 














cycles 




All over the world, the British Bulldog is noted for his strength 
and tenacity. 

So it is with Seccotine. Seccotine is used all over the world by 
people in every walk of life FOR STICKING ARTICLES. 
Because Seccotine is so very strong and lasting in its results — 
it has many imitators; but it is an established fact that since 




1884. when 



was first made, it 



way to its "next best 



ly sup 



every 



The question of surfaces presents no obstacles to Seccot 




m 



* 



wood, cardboard, etc., can be treated with equal success 



Sold everywhere in pin-stopper tubes, complete with d 



for 



d.. 6d.. and 9d 








are 



miles ahead 






easy-running 



Tom, 




an 



dSa 



u 



m Know 






MODELS 

From £4 I 1 6 ; 6 cash 
{Sturmey Archer 3 -speed 
Ztar 21\* extra, cask). 
Deferred Terms from 
/ — do%vn and 12 equal 
™ monthly payments 
[from 913). Sturmey- 
Archer 3-speed gear 211 
extra mmthli* Dunlop 
tyres and the best of every- 



the Raleigh must be the 
world's finest cycle. They 
know that the Raleigh 

runs easily and sweetly 

that it will stand up to 
hard knocks and school- 
boy treatment. Dad 

knows it too. You'll find 

1 
it much easier to get a 

cycle if you tell him you 
want a Raleigh, 

Send for "The Book of the 




n 



and addre 



nearest dealer. The Raleig 



s$ of 
leizh 




am 



POST THIS COUPON to Dept. M 

M'CAW, STEVENSON & ORR LTD., BELFAST 




Cycle Co. Ltd . , Nott ix 
{Depots and Agents Ei'fitj- 

u/icre.) 



I should like to have, post free, 
copies of your Free Booklets 

which describe the many uses 

■ 

for Seccotine. 



I N CLI I I C «f«itftiiit#«t«i4|«i4| t i|t«t«i iftfM 





r^YUU rC55 * + 44***tt#*n*«**«***«»*ft » * !#■*»«• 



TH 




ALL 



ST 





L 



8 I 




Y 






tit the Sturmey- Archer l-tpeed qear 



near that makes cyelinq eaiv 



XI 1 



THE 




MAGAZINE 





Hornby 




ves 





■ 

o matter what the age or condition of your old Locomotive, 
can exchange it under our "Part-Exchange" Scheme. 






The allowance that will be made for your old Locomotive is shown in a 



list of Part-Exchange allowances for Hornby Locomotives that is 
obtainable from any Meccano or Hornby Train dealer, or direct from 
Meccano Ltd. Please note that the price of the new Hornby Locomotive 



you purchase 




not 







allowance made for your old Locomotive. 



e less than double the Part-Exchange 



» 






HOW THE SCHEME WORKS 

Suppose you have a No. 1 Tank Locomotive that you wish to exch 




e. 






You see from the list that Its exchange allowance is 5/9. You then look 

at the Hornby Train catalogue and choose one of the new Locomotives, 

not less than double 



th 



cost of which is not less th 





the Part-Exchange allowance we make for your No. 1 Tank Locomotive. 

You decide to have, say, a No. 2 Special Tank Locomotive, the price of 
which is 21/-. Pack up your old No. 1 Tank, take it to your dealer, with 



15/3, and he will exchange it for the new model that you require. 
If It Is more convenient you can send your old No. 1 




to us for 




ange. In this case you deduct 5/9 from 21/- (the price of the new 



No. 2 Special Tank), and enclose 16/3, that is 15/3 plus 1/- for carriage 
on the new locomotive. Address your parcel to Meccano Limited. 
ecial Service Department, Binns Road, Liverpool 13. 

We cannot accept more than one old Locomotive in exchange 




for 



a new Locomotive. Tenders cannot be 



changed 



The 





exchange 



cannot 



to 

















« 





We undertake to exchange 
any damaged Meccano parts 
for similar new parts at half 
the current list price, no 



matter 



how old or how 



much damaged the parts 



Send 



them 



to 



Meccano 






Limited, Special Service Depart- 
ment, Binns Road, Liverpool 13, 
together with half the cost of 



the new parts, plus the return 



postage, which 




be exactly 



the same as that you paid on 
the parcel of old parts 



Parts cannot be taken in 
exchange for Outfits. 






HORNBY 
TRACK 




Hornby Clockwork Rails, Points and Crossings can 

the allowance being 



Electric, on a piece-for-piece 

list price of the Clockwork track returned. 





for 



current 



any other 
Meccano 



Send 



your 






track to Meccano Limited, Special Service Department, 
Binns Road, Liverpool 13, together with the cost of the new track less half the price 
of the old track, plus the return postage, which will be exactly the same as that you paid 
on the parcel of old track. 

This applies to Hornby Track only, not to Hornby Accessories fitted 

with rails. 



\ 



► 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



XIII 



— 






1 






I 



f 




I 



Chas* E. Brown 



■ 






i 


















• 



sna 







tk 



• 



is 






With full sails and flag a-flutc 
craft makes a 



er 




this 



snap for Selochrome 




ve 




Roll 




ilm. A good test for the speed of Selochrome 
in poor light, this picture proves that Selochrome 

to yield vigorous negatives of 
ects, even in dull weather. 



is 



fast 



enoue 




movin 




p 




Use Selochrome for uniform success with your 



camera 



an 







for the beautiful true-to-Nature 






tone gradation which its sensi 







to yellows 



-»■ 



OPTICAL 



i 



CRAFTSMEN 



SINCE 



/ 




YOU CAN'T OVERWIND THE FILM 



YOU CAN'T BREAK THE 



BODY 




You 

help 




r 





but 





pictu 





the 



V. 





The 
BRILLIANT V.& 

Six models ran sine 
jTMiri i >-I2-6 with 
FI7.7 Voiutar Inns 
to £9 with FJJ.5 
Voigtar I ens in 
Com pur * Rapid 

outer* 



Jiven if you've never used 
a camera before the Brilliant 
V.6 will get pcrteci ptcturcs- 
lor you. The hooded (inder 

shows you the picture 
almost full -size while you 

tsilce it and for speed work 

t here'* the spom-finder which lei* you "shoot" 

from eye-level. An automatic brake stops you 
from overwinding the him. A hold-all built 
into the side carries light filters* etc* The 
is unbreakable* You get 12 pictures 24 M square 
on standard 8 exposure 34" x 24'" film. Von 
get perfect lens and shutter equipment- You 
get. in short, a luxury camera for as lilt lc as 

£3-12-61 See the V.6 at your dealer's or write 

h"Tmv fnr detail a* 





SCHERING LTD. (Voigtlandc 



r 



Dept 





185/192, HIGH HOLBORN, LONDON. W.C.I 



OPTICAL CRAFTSMEN *-SINCE 





uild 





own engine 

Only a few hand tools required. 

* 

Stuart No. 10* 

Completely machined set with full 

instructions: 

from 18/6 post free. 

All our sets from 5/- upwards, illustrated and 
described in our No, 2 catalogue. 6d. post free. 






72 pages fully illustrated. 

STUART TURNER LTD 

H enley-on-Thames 









greens gives you. 






ROLL FILM 

FITS ALL CAMERAS, INCLUDING MINIATURE SIZES 







FLY/ 



By Aeromodels Ltd. 

(t'24th fan s«o) 

■ 

We stock these spfendid 

fho very finest 

ol their kind- The Kirs are 
a 





complete, with 
fufl instructions, white the 
finished models are really 
excellent flyers. 



Prices 

"LEOPARD" 






«L 




#* 



Of 



MOTH and MILES "MAGfS- 



TER/* Complete Kit 3 '6 



HAWKER 



m 




n 



Made In England by i 

ILFORD LIMITED, ILFORD, LONDON 



MILES "MAGISTER," wing span I/ in. 



4* m 



Postage 6d. extra. 




r 




THE BOYS ARCADIA 




17. HOUGHTON 
LIVERPOOL 1 



ST., CLAYTON SQ. 
T«l. Royal 562 




XIV 



THE MECCANO MAGAZINE 



■ 




For use with one large Twin Cell Battery. 



Rof. 140, Hi mm. Balloon, 6d. ReJ ML 15 mm, Balloon, 6d. 
Obtainable from your dealer, or dtroel, posl lree r gil, each. 

Catalogue Um< VITALITY BULBS. 

Imperial Works (MM), Ryland Road. London. N.W.5, 



Model Racing Yachts 



No, 1 18 ins. long (with auto-tfeeririQ gear) 

2 9? 

3 26 

4 30 

5 36 

6 42 



ti 



.. 



9m 






N 



II 



«» 



P* 






" 




45/- 

57'6 
92'6 
.. 132'6 

9-9 






■»* 



ts ■ 



411 



1/ 






u-'in 





ncr ;vw< tcirtiit 

fr. 
Fur aftir ail 

"it's the finish 
that count*." 



Bermuda Rig 



Union Silk 
Sails 

Hollow 
Metal Spars 



Automatic 

Steering Gear 



Hollow 

Yellow 
Pine Hull 



Plated Fittings 







r 




THE BOYS' ARCADIA 



17, Houghton Street, Clayton Square, 



LIVERPOOL 1 



TeL Royal 652, 




A.SAS. 










SALE OF GENUINE SWISS MADE CHROMIUM CASED 
OFFICERS' WRISTttT (JEWELLED MOVEMENT) 




Actual 

Size 




STOP-WATCHES 



Originally sold by 
us for 15'- each. 

NOW ONLY 




/ 




Post and linx 6tf.. 

ACCURATE 

READINGS TO 

ONE - FIFTH 

SECOND, 

Without doubt the finest 

NEW MODEL. watch value obtainable to-dny. 

Accurate timckoopers. Fully guaranteed* 

Write, cull nr 'phone Holhorn 0276. 
Luminous Dials 6d* extra* Officers* Adjustable 
Solid Leather Straps, only !/- extra. Officers' 

Adjustable Chrome Chains, 2/- extra* 

SatiBiacttrm guaranteed or nwn&y instantly returned* 

MARINE & OVERSEAS SERVICES LT0. (Dapt. 190), 

16. SILVER ST., HIGH KOLBORN, LONDON, W.Ct 



* 




Railway 








EJ5 ENGINEMANS JOB CARD 

forms are useful in arranging ihs various duties of 

cn a Hornby railway layout. Supplied in f 
oi 50 sheers, Price 7 id each, posr tree. 

Meccano Limited, Binns Rood, Liverpool 13 



These 
the 




















Go 




♦ ♦ 



It's 



a gran 





an 





can enjoy 




wherever 




ere's enough water to 



float 



a canoe, an 




that' 



s 




a 



bout four inches. 






a 



di 



ng 



o 



ma 



all 
kes 



will he sent you on 



receipt of a postr 

card. 



FEDERATION OF FOLDING CANOE 

AND BOAT MANUFACTURERS 

79, Buckingham Palace Road, 

London, S.W.I. 




MECCANO ENAMEL 

Meccano enamel has been 
Introduced to enable model* 

builders to convert nickel 
pares to colour or to touch up 

coloured parts should such 
treatment become necessary 

mishandling. It 
Is available In red. blue or 

green, each colour being 

Identical in shade with the 

enamels used In the Meccano Factory for spraying 

Meccano parts, J Price per tin 8d. 





■ 






Meccano Ltd*, Binns Road* Liverpool 13. 






MINIATURE 









AEROPLANE PILOTS 



Aeropl 



ane Parts Nos. 




an 




P100 



v 




Miniature Pilot* are now available for fitting to all 
open cockpit machines built with the Nos, 00, 0. t. 2, 
1 Special and 2 Special Aeroplane Constructor Outfits. 
These attractive little figures, which add a wonderful 
touch of realism, are supplied with green coat and 
orange cap, blue coat and red cap* or red coat and 
green cap. Aero Part No. P99. which Is suitable for 
fitting to the Nos, OO and O Outfit models, is fixed to a 
special bracket that takes the place of the Propeller 
Shaft Bracket In the Outfit. The special bracket Is 
secured by passing bolts through the sides of the fuse- 

i 1 4 4 ^»* 

lage into the threaded holes in the bracket The 
Propeller Shaft rests in the bearing socket formed 

in the Pilot's body. 

Parr No. P100 f Illustrated above) Is used In Nos, 1, 

2, 1 Special and 2 Special Outfit models. The Pilot Is 
fixed to a double angle bracket ready for bolting co 
the sHet of the fuselage. 



Prices: 



P99 Aeroplane Pilot 
PI 00 



#* * 



• *• 



#ach 44 

44 



it 



Meccano Ltd., Binns Road, Liverpool 13 







Pity Peter's painful plight 



Plodding homeward pushing bike, 

Cannot ride, has to hike» 
Lamp expired, will not light. 
Peter! Ponder! Why not get 
A Pifco Dynamo Lighting Set? 

Unfailing brill in nt light generated as 
you ride, 100 ft. headlight beam, red 
rear light, Silent running. Quickly fitted. 

Save* money. Guaranteed. 

ff>«FC© 

DYNAMO LIGHTING SET 





PI FCO" Service" 
fi'Vott dynamo, 

hfOiliamPi red 
r ar lamp, all 
ch ftw*t*m ptatttL 






k VOID AND REFUSE SUBSTITUTES ' 

FREE, Write for Catalogue of Britain's 

Ucst CycU Lamps* 

PIFCO LTD., Watling St.. Manchester 

and at: 58, City Road, London, E*C*L 




I rota &H 

Cycle Shops 



THE 1938 



MODEL 
RAILWAY 

EXHIBITION 



Locomotives, 



ing 










agons, etc. 



and Antiques. 





Rid 



es 




Free Cinema 



CENTRAL HALL 



WESTMINSTER 



AP 




19th 



23rd 



Tuesday, 2 p m to 10 p.m* 

Other days, 1, am. fo 10 p.m 



ADMISSION: 



Adults 1'3 

(Incl. Tax) 



Children 6d 

(under 12] 



Resi Lounge. Restaurant and Refreshments in the Exhibition. 

Special rales for parties, apply Hon. Sec, 85, Wood 

Vale. London, N.tGL 




BUILD UP 




HOME LABORATORY 



A first essenti ! is a good supply of test 



tubes 




all sizes. We therefore offer a 




TUBE 




«* 



which consists of 3 nests, each containing 

■ — 






4* x | 

5* x i 



the following sizes: 



5J- x 1- 



43* K j* 

6* x 1j* 






CARR. 
PAID. 




Together with a brush for cleaning. 
Booklet of tested experiments 6d. post free. 

Catalogue sent free on request. 

DCrif (Scientific Dept. GK 60, HirJi St.. 
DtViV Stoke NewingLon, London, N.16. 



MECCANO 

LUBRICATING 

Before commencing to oper- 
ate ft Meccano model, or to run 
a Hornby Train, all gears and 
bearings should be oiled 
thoroughly wfth Meccano Lubri- 
cating OIL This oil li specially 

prepared and Is of the 
consistency for chft 




right 
purpose* 



Price per bottle 6d. 

Meccano Ltd., Btnna Road, 

Liverpool 13. 







J- 




First and Best in 




/ 



72 



nd 






Scale Modelling 



LATEST PRODUCTION 




THE 



II 



HANNOVERANER 



rr 




nstructive 




/ 



price 




/ 




Wonderfully Realistic 

Accessories 

A A Gun and Crew price 

Trailer for AA Gun 





Service Lorry wi 

Figures 




Two 



f* 




/ 




Sound Locator Unit... 



ft 



9d. 





ectric 
Mod 



oo 



StOI 



e 



eac 




d Light 

Airports 



Light; 



// 



6d 






Accurate Models-All British Made 

SKYB1RD Models make a most fascinatng 
obby-there is a complete range 

accessories for making War Scenes, 








Gvi 




Airports 



or 





Mod 

romes. 



ern 



Service 




Sen 

REVIEW, 



stamps 76. for a copy of AIR 

_ _^B -M _ _ 




e 



off. 



icra 



organ o 



f 




e 



SKYBIRD LEAGUE, 



Write for FRHE ill 




leaflet, Price 




at 





hip Form. 



&t 



SKYBIRDS 



M 



(Desk B) 




# 



Aldcrmanbury Avenue 

London, E.C.2 



PISTOLS (Toy). Famous 'G man,' 4/6. orhers 3/6, 2/6, 
1/6. post free. Vickery. 25, Park Road. Twickenham. 

MODEL PETROL ENGINES. Build i h. P . Petrol 
Engines. Full Set Part Tooled Ca.-rings, 9/9. Car. 3d. 
Hurler. Profit-Sharing Works, Littleovcr, Derby. 



OIL 



ALWAYS HANDY 



WHEN KEPT 



MODERN 

1 



ves 



GU 



! 



LEAKPROOF 

Ask your Dealer to show them to you, or 



write 



i 



brochure. 






Parker-Hale Ltd., Birmingham, 4. 



- t 
T>- 



















MECCANO MAGAZINE 










otographers 



< 




WELLC 

POSU 



M 




» 






CALCULATOR 



HANDBOOK AND DIARY 

1938 EDITION 

Tells correct exposure at a 
glance. Contains speed 
factors for nearly 300 plates 

and films. 

Price 1j6 from Photographie Dealers 

Write for descriptive literature 

Burroughs Wellcome a Co 







SNOW MILL BUILDINGS LONDON K, C- f 



* 7375 



OFYRIGHT 



- 




BARGAIN 



INSTRUMENT WIRE ot 



OFFER 




Double Cotton Covered. 

104 lbs. 25 SWG 1/8 per lb. 

12S lbs. 28 SWG 2/2 per lb. 
38 lbs. 30 SWG 2/7 per |b 
32 lbs, 32 SWG 3/2 per lb 
43 lbs. 34 SWG 3/9 pei lb. 
52 lbs. 36 SWG 4/5 par lb. 



Double Silk Covered. 

37 lbs. 26 SWG 3/- per lb. 
72 lbs. 28 SWG 3/3 per lb 
72 lbs. 30 SWG 3/6 por lb, 

60 fbs. 32 SWG 4/- per Jb. 
56 lbs. 34 SWG 4/9 per lb. 
70 lbs. 36 SWG 5/10 pr, lb. 
39 lbs. 40 SWG 9/- per lb. 
13 lbs. 42 SWG 11/3 per lb. 



Enamelled and DDC. 

49 lbs. 30 SWG 3/4 per lb. u ios. nt awu 11/ j per ID 

Prgo.iSd-cmall orcftrs under ICK-. Roots free. Any quantity supplred 

** BOAT MOTOR 

A highly efficient 4-volf Motor o( 
surprising power with Laminated 
Armature, Permanent Magnet, 

very low current consumption 

Practical results obtained from 
flash lamp bartery. 

Eaialaxuc tor other Models, 4d. 

post free. 

204. Lower Addiscombe Road. 

Croydon, Surrey 




Post 44* 




WILKINSON, 



l 





TALL 



in 



Your Height increased 
14 day* or money 

backl 5-5 inchea rapidly 
fcined. Amazing Complete Course sent for 5J- 
.O. t or derails free. Write Stabbing System. 

Dept. M. 28. Dean Road. London. H W 2 




THE WEB1EY SERVICE AIR RIFLE M 



mo 
WRiTr rr** 

OEstffi^tiva 
p o 1 o § a 

■ 



PVMCKA&I 




This extremely 

accurate and power- 
ful Air ftifle h rdeal foi 
Target Practice in the garden 

or for eareiminating R*u and 
similar vermin. 
Calibre 22 or 177 With feafiighi and poepsight. 

WebIeyAScoULId..87.WeamanSt..BlnnlnRtiam4 




This Space i^L' ,, 4 S? "■ ? nd -** 1 * */ 

a******* per rnrmth. The sum is 

^M. T 1 ■ ■ 




i*u. uw pne* of a whole page -«,«:. m-h«c..u. wr, 
2M1 uuo boy* and parents read the "Meccano Maeatinf 
each_jnonth. Yon can therefore reach this exclusiv 



less 



MECCANO MAGAZINE 

SPRING BACK BINDER 



ri 



■ 



There 



is no better way of keeping your Maga- 
zines clean and tidy 
than by binding them 
in one of the special 
binders we supply. 







These 
strong 
covered 



binders have 

stiff backs, 

with black 








ttatlon leather* 

Jly tooled, ^nd are 
lettered in gold. Th 
large binder holds 12 

Magazines — price 3/6 
post free. The small 
binder holds 4 

2/4 



Magazines 



price 



post frae. 

Meccano Ltd., Btnns Rd. t Llv«r» 







XV 




be 



a 




u*b or 






n 









a 



11 



your 



Li f e 



"What you put into your head while still 
young decides what sort or a position you 
will occupy later on. Brain, trained brain, 
Is the power that wins a position of respon- 
sibility and a good income. You must be 
systematically trained in the work of your 
choice, and that, usually, is only possibl 

in spare time. "Tell me how a young man 
spends his evening hours,'* a great industrial 
leader has said, "and 111 tell you whether 
lie will achieve success or remain a sub- 

ordinate. 



Th 



c 




ternational Correspondence 



Schools offer you the training you may need. 




There is none better, none more convenient 

for the student. It was the I.C.S. that made 
the postal method of instruction what it is 

and the LOS. remains the greatest 
institution of its kind in the world, 

LCS. Courses cost no more than those of 
other reputable schools teaching by correspond' 
ence; indeed, in some cases they cost less. An 
important consideration lies in the fact thai all 
LCS. instruction books and special textbooks 
are supplied without extra charge. The students 

of many postal concerns have to buy the books 
required, that often involving an expenditure 

of several pounds. 

WRITE TO-DAY FOR FREE BOOKLET 
and advice on any one or more of the 

following subjects: 



JOURNALISM 
MARINE ENGINEERING 

MECHANICAL ENG. 







ACCOUNTANCY 
ADVERTISING 
AERONAUTICAL ENG. 
AGRICULTURE 
AIR CONDITIONING 
ARCHITECTURE 

BOOK-KEEPING 

BUILDING 
CHEMICAL ENG. 

COMMERCIAL ART 
COMMERCIAL TRAINING 
CIVIL ENGINEERING 
DIESEL ENGINEERING 
ORAUBHTSMANSHIP 
ELECTRICAL ENG. 
FRENCH AND SPANISH 

BfNERAL EDUCATION 
HORTICULTURE 

INSURANCE 

EXAMINATIONS: 

Technical. Professional. Civil Service, Matriculation 



MOTOR ENGINEERING 

PLUMBING 

RADIO 

SALESMANSHIP 

SANITARY ENG. 

SCIENTIFIC MOMENT 

SECRETARIAL WORK 

SHORT-STORY WRITING 
SURVEYING 

TELEVISION 

TEXTILE MANUF'G 

WORKS MANAGEMENT 
WINDOW DRESSING 
WOODWORKING 



INTERNATIONAL 
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS LTD. 
Dept. 21 S, International Buildings 

Kin** way, London, W.C.2 



1 

XVI 



READERS 



r 



SALES 



Readers should note that all advertisements of Hornby 
Trains mid other Meccano products included in this 
column relate to items no longer featured in the catalogue. 
Advertisements of current products cannot be accepted 
for this column. 




Sale. Chromatic Accordion (£1/10/6), 19/-* 
scope, 7/6; Palhescopc' Motor, 12/6; Kodak 620. 15/-; 
Wireless Parts; linsigu Camera (£6-10/-), 32/6. Write 
for list of bargains.— P. R. Lincoln, 60, High Road, 
Potters Bar. 

Sale. £4/4/- Iiassett-Lowke Electric Engine with 
Tender. 15 iris, (6-volts). Also 25/- Clockwork Engine, 
erfect condition. Both 42/-, or separate. — Copp, 30E, 




mperors Gate, London, S.W.7. 

Sale. Sky birds, Seagull, Hendon, and others, ISO 
Britain's Soldiers, and Meccano Steam Engine, Applv — 
ttadrield, The Maples. Map!* Avenue, Bishop's 
S tor l ford. Hertfordshire. 



Sale. Complete Electric Trix Miniature Railway, 
Almost new. Comprises four Remote Control Points, 
two Engines, full Rolling Stock, designed for A.C. 
Mains with Transformers, Controllers. Splendid long 
layout with full Permanent Way Accessories* Cost 

Richards, 




£9/10/-. Accept £6/10/-.— Richards, 38, 
Gardens, WiUesden, N.W.10, 

Sale, About £3 Meccano (Red, Green, Nickel); No, 2 
Clockwork Motor; all IW)6*U»37 "Meccano Magazines* 1 ; 
28 other numbers. No reasonable offer refused. Sold 
separately,— Hepworth, 122, London Road, Peter* 
borough. # 

"Model Rait way News," January 1925- February 
1938 complete, Volume One bound. "Wonderful 
Models," Two Volumes. All excellent coudition. £3 
lot and carriage.— Grab ana Gadsby, Bridgnorth, 
Shropshire. 

Wanted. "Rapkiu" Challenge Albums or Binders 
only, Green, 124"x II". State price and condition.— 
Evans, 59, Crystal Pdace Koad, London, S.K.2'2. 

Sale. Brand New Chromium-plated ti-volt Bicycle 
Dynamo Lighting Set, complete with Headlamp, 
Tail Light, Ilex, etc. Cost 21/-. Take 10/6,-— Elson, 
480, Biuley Road, Uinfey, Coventry, 








60, 



no, mostly Red and Green, 20v. Motor and 
Transformer/ Cost £11. Aero Parts, and Motor. Cost 
24/-. Offers. — Berry, Southarn Road, Halt Green, 

BinnifiifhaiLL 

Sale, 1,000 different Stamps, 4/6.— D 
Vkkerman Street, Halifax, Yorkshire. 

Lolt's Chemistry Set. Hardly ever used. Condition 
perfect. Complete. Cost 42/^ Sell £U Rolling Stock, 
complete Track. Lists, — Spencer, Oak Dene, Carr 
Koad, Burnley. 

For Sale. Gilbert Electric Rye, new, with Batteries* 
Cost 29/6. Reasonable oiler accepted. — Vernon, West- 
end, Asblelgh Koad, Horsham. 

Selling. Over £« worth of Red^Green Meccano, 
including Electric and Clockwork Motors. Will sell by 
parts or complete. Send for lists to—Peter Fleming, 
School House, Kildary, Ross 

Sale, Birtg 0-6*4 Flying Fox, IQ/- # Bowman Steam 
Engine, 15/-. "Model Railway News/' Raleigh Bicycle* 
Electric Gramophone-, stamp details, — B* Woodman. 

II, Lyridhurst Road, N.W& 




Loco for sale. Bassett-Lowke Schools Class. Perfect 

condition. Cost 5 guineas. 20-volt AX. \\ hat offers? 
Harris Lawrence, Hai ley bury College, Hertford. 

Wanted. Old Railway Tickets- Please send any you 
can spare to C. H. llemson, Hotel Imperial, Lowestoft, 

Sale. "ALM.'s," 1925, 1926, 1927. Also 3 volumes 
Shakespeare; "Comedies, 11 "Histories/' "Tragedies/' 
Facsimile original published 1623. Cost £3/10/- per 
volume. Oilers,— Guy, 22 , Hue Street, Jersey. 



Camera, Folding Kodak* F8 Lens. Perfect condition* 
£3/3/-. Bargain 25/-.— Wilson, 73, Cefdeston 
Road, Loudon, E.5. 




Sale 



H. 



Koclatoy Motor-driven Cinematograph, with 
Accessories. Good condition. Cost £7. Take 50/- 

Neison. ^Achill/ 1 Glenageary (Co.). Dublin. 

£5 Red Green .Meccano and Electric Motor. Good 
condition. £2 or offer.— Carpenter, Mcrok, Barn hill 
Road, Wembley, Middlesex. 

Sal % 



11 Shipping Wonders of 




the 



■. Complete sets. 

World" and "Engineering Wonders of the 

UntuumL 10/- each. As new.— Baher, 229, Belmont 
Road, Belfast* 

Advertiser, retired professional man, is open to 
purchase several stamp collections, large loose lots or 
small dealer's stock, Cbieflv interested in British 
Colonials and U.S.A. 
Bank and Solicitors 1 




n ion 




an not desired. 
Collector, Ho U ins 

w ■ . ■ ■ ■ ■ 



re in rc nces. — 
Chambers, 6-ta, Bridge Street, Manchester. 

"M.M.V 1933-1936, complete, new condition. 8/6, 

or 2/3 per year.— Gates, 6, Birehdale Gardens, Chad- 
well Heath. Essex, 



I ■ 





Hayes, 111, Beech- 



"MJU/s/* 1934-37. "Scoops." enure issue. "Mag 
nets." "Chums Animate," * 'Practical Mechanics/ 1 
Foreign Stamps. Write for list.— 
mount Avenue, London. W.7. 

Size 4 Meccano (Red-Green), in excellent condition. 
Beit •Her accepted. — G, Lawrence, High Street* 
Fleur-d«-Lis v Mon. 



CLOSE OF SEASON OFFER 

Siam»Wa!lttfwtrhpcrf.gauseh mounts, 100 diff, stamps 

tfccludiTijc Col. and S. Rhodesia Cor^CoK and Dominion 

Jubilee*, mint Br. Cols, of 3 reigns, Spanish Civil War* 

eta, 7n. with approvals, llli without Approvals. 

■111. POaiiT TOWN. MANSFIELD* NOTTS. 



\ 













i 



MECCANO MAGAZINE 










is Month's Special Articles i 



r 

I 

I 
I 

I 

i 

| Books to KeA*d ... 
I Careers in the R.A.F 

Competition Corner 



I 

I 



A Great Canadian Gold Mine 

m** V WS *mt mm* mm* 







** fr 



*#* 



-#* 



** r 



** ¥ 



Page 

194 
208 



I 

i 

i 



Destruction of Famous Niagara Bridge 
Elect riik-(i Wirral lines... 



I 

I 

| Engineering News 

I Famous Engineers: John Ericsson (II) 

I Fireside Fun 



- ■ 






222 | 

217 I 

246 I 

I 



• »* 



#* • 



+ ■ fc 



*#># 



216 
210 



I 
214 | 

196 I 

247 I 



I 



From Our Readers 



. m - 



I Great Ports of the World: Bombay 



*# ■ 



#* + 



•■••# 



| Guild Pages 

| Hornby Railway Company Pages 

I Miles Low Wing Monoplanes *.. 

I Model-Building Compel ui-ms ... 

I 

I 

i 



224 

218 

234-5 



I 

I 
I 

I 



Model-Building Competition Results 

New Meccano Models „. 



• ** 



■ m m 



#•* 



#•• 



•*■ 



236-24 1 | 

206 I 
232 I 



Photography 
| Kail way News 
| Shipping News 
I 



■ * * 



V- * 



«* ■ 



** - 



«*f 



*-- 



233 

226, 230 

202 






I 

I 
I 










eclion 



... 



I Stamp Collecting 

J Tilbury Section of the L.M.S. 






4 # f> 



m i 

■ 

204 | 

228 I 
243 ! 



J Visit to a Famous Pottery Works 



I 

I 



212 

200 



I 
I 

I 




■ 



150 




PHOTOGRAPHS 



Send 3d* for specimen postcard and our 
Lists of over 1,150 different real 



Illustrated 

over E,1)U a nte rent real photograph* of 
Liners, Freighters, etc., including Cunard-White Star. 
Harrison, Blue Funnel* etc,, 2d* each. 2/- per dozen, 
postage free. Photographs of the new liners: "Awatca/ - 
"City of Pretoria, 1 * and "Delane'* now available. 

B. & A. FEUD EN (M.M.). 
12, Harlech Road, Blundelfsands, Liverpool. 

(Trade Enquiries Invited, I 



23. Ens. 



^™ 



RAILWAYS, SHIPS & AEROPLANES 

PHOTOGRAPHS: 3,000 SUBJECTS* 
Over 54,000 postcards in stock. 

Send 4d. for list and specimen card (stating section). 

ALL PHOTOQRAPHS iposuard size) 3d. each. 

21& per dot. {post tree.) 

REAL PHOTOGRAPHS CO. 

(Dopt. M), COOPER'S BUILDINGS, LIVERPOOL, 1. 




from 37/6 



CINEMATOGRAPHS 
CINEMATOCRAPH FILMS 

Standard Size only. Write for Catalogue, post 
free. Sample Film and Catalogue 1/- and 2/S, 

Filmerics Co.. 57. Lancaster Rd„ Leytonstone. E.11 



WHEN WRITING TO ADVERTISERS 

I 

Readers are urged to observe the following pointa 
when u riling to advertisers: 

1* MentioQ the **M,M. M and any special reference 
number quoted in the advertisement This helpi 
the rtdveriJser* lo give prompt attention. 

2. See that the full amount of the price and any 
postage U Included, It is unfair to expect adver- 
tisers to full! their undertakfngi promptly if lhort 
remittance* are sent. 

3. GIVE YOLR FULL ADDRESS, 

THE ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER 
MECCANO MAGAZINE, Binns Road. LIVERPOOL 13 



■ 





OWN 





this year, save hire charges. Canoes, dinghies, from 
49/6. Build yourself KITS from 27/6. Send for lists 



to makers 



* .. 



POUNCY "Meta-Craft" CM.M.), Christchurch. Hanta. 

London Stockist: C. A. Lewis, Weybridge Station, Surrey. 

Ireland: H. 9. Hammond, 1 04, Middle Abbey St,. Dublin. 






PEA BULBS 




iVot ttss 
than six 




Light up your railway stations! 
signals* mcdels, alarm docks* 
ere* with thase brilliant 4v .25 amp. 
Opal. Pea Bulbs with MIS fining 



(Oh"/ dfid 30 in. Hex, Light from 4v.pock#t 
^*. w battery o* accumulator: Foreign - 

H. FRANKS. DepLI. 81. New Oxrord St. UND0N.WX.1. 



6 for 1/. 

20 for 216 

6 d« 7/6 



— 





Registered at G~P.Q* $ London, for irammissim h} 

Canadian Magazine Post. 

EDITORIAL AND ADVERTISING OFFICE: 

Liverpool 13, England. 



Telegrams: "Meccano.. Liverpool" 









Publication Date. The "Af,Af." is published on 
the 1st of each month and may be ordered from any 
Meccano dealer f or from any bookstall or newsagent, 

pries 6d, per copy. It will be mailed direct from 

this office, §/*m for &t% issues and 8/- for twelve issues. 
To Contributors. The Editor will consider articles 




and photographs of general interest and payment will 
be made for those published. Whilst every care will 
be taken of articles, etc, submitted, the Editor cannot 

responsibility for any loss or damage, A 
stamped addressed envelope of the requisite sk# should 
be sent where the contribution is to be returned if 
unacceptable. 

Readers* Sales and Wants. Private advertisements 
t.e, ( not trade) are charged Id, per word, minimum 1/- 
"asfa with order. Editorial and Advertising matters 
should not be dealt with on the same sheet of paper. 




Small Advertisements. 1/6 per line (average seven 
words to the line), or 16/- per inch (average 12 lines 
to the inch). Cash with order 

for space' bookings, and 



Quotations for space bookings, 
latest net sale figures, will be sent on request. 




Press Day f etc* Copy should be sent as early in 
the mouth as possible tor insertion in following issue. 
We usually close for press on or before 6th of each 
mouth for following issue. Hall -tone blocks up to 
1110 screen, 



. 



Proofs .of advertisements will be sent when possible 
for space bookings of not less than half-an-iuch. 

Voucher copies. Sent free to advertisers booking 
one inch or over. Other advertisers desiring vouchers 
should add 8d. to their remittance and should order 
voucher copy at same time. 

Remittances. Postal Orders and Cheques should be 
made payable to Meccano Ltd. 



Ordering the "M.M/* Overseas 



i 



Readers Overseas and in foreign countries may 
order the "Meccano Magazine" from regular Meccano 
dealers or direct from tins otiice. The price and 
subscription rates are as above* except in the ca&e£of 
Australia, where the price is 1/2 per copy (postage 
extras and the subscription rates »/- for six months 
and 16/- for 12 months (post free) f Caiiada# where 
the price is 10c* per copy, and the subscription rates 
65c, for six mouths, and $1,25 (or 12 months (post paid). 

1 he U,S.A. price is 15c* per copy, and the subscription 

rates $1 and $2 for 6 and 12 months respectively 
(post free)* 



Overseas 




are reminded 
the "A/.il/." 



that the prices 

shown throughout the "Ai.*W/ f are those relating to 
the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland. Current 

Overseas Price Lists of Meccano Products will be- mailed 
fret- ou request to any of the undermentioned agencies. 
Prices of other goods advertised may 1ms obtained 
direct from the linns concerned. 

CANADA: Meccano Ltd., 167-189, Church St, Toronto. 

UNTIED SIA'IES: Meccano Co, of America Inc., 

New Haven, Conn,, Meccano Co. ot America 
Inc., 2UU t l-ilth Av, f New York, 

AUSTRALIA: Messrs, L, G, Page & Co., 

52, Clarence Street, bydney, N.S.W. 



tF.O. 



NEW ZEALAND: Models Limited, Ihird Floor, 

Paykcl's liuikliitgs, 9, An^ac Avenue 

Box 129), Auckland, C L 

SOUTH AFRICA: Mr. A, K.' Harris {P.O> Box 1199), 

142, Market Slrtet; Johannesburg. 

INDIA: Karachi: Daryanamal and liros., Elphinstone 

Street, Horn nay; Bombay bports Depot, 

DboUi "lalao, Calcutta; Ltomuuy Sports 
Depot, 2, Lindsay Street, Madras; liom- 
bay Sports Depot, 162, Mount! Koad, 

The Editor wishes to make known the fact that 
it is not necessary for any reader u* pay more than 
the published price* Anyone who is being overcharged 
should lodge a complaint with the Meccano agent 
in his country or write direct to the Editor, 



WEBLEY AIR pistols 






Marvellously 
Accurate for 

target practice. 



No license required to purchase. 




Senior 45S Mark X 32'6. 
Junior 2 1 '-, Webley Air Rifle 95'. 

Write for List, Webley & Scott Ltd., 
87, Weaham St., Birmingham, Eng. 



THE MECCANO MAGAZhni. 




The 193/-S issue ol the- Hornby Book of Trains is the finest that has ever been 



produced. It contains splendid articles, hilly illustrated by photographs, dealing with 
British express trains and locomotives, the mysteries of an engine shed, the fascination of 
operating a miniature railway, and othei interesting topics. 



n addition the book forms a complete catalogue ot Hornby Trams for elscinc and 
clockwork railways. The Hornby Locomotives. Rolling Stock and Accessories are 

beautilully illustrated in full colour. 



How to o 




am 




e 



Boo 




7Tm Hnrribv Book of Trains may be drained from any Meccano dealer, price 3d.. 01 direct from Meccano Ltd. 
[Den 1 AMI, BinfVj Road, Liverpool 13, price 4 id post free. In fhft latter rase a remittance in '.lamps should, be semf 
.:,r.'i im name and address of the sender should be clear!/ wrilten. 

Readers living in Au Iralia. New Zealand or South Africa who require* topics should send iheir postal orders 
for Bri (which includes postage) lo th© addres-e* givsn below, The M&ccano Bianch at Toronto will deal with 

Canadian otx'er* and the price fs 12 cents pot*.paid 

■ 

Readers hvrng in countries oiher than iho&e mentioned should order from Meccano Lid,, Binns. Road. Liverpool 13, 
^enomy 6d. in stamp* with their order. 



Overseas Agencies: 

AUSTRALIA: E 0, Psqe 8 Co , 52. Ctef?nco Sr . Svdnsy [P.O. Box !S32k) 

NFW t E ALAND Model* Limited, Fa-Ae's Euifd 1 gs. Ansae Avenue, Auckland C 1 (P O- Bux 129). 

SOUTH AfRlCA Arthur I HaffJ"^ Ul Uf"ol Sneei, J©fom*jfcjjri.ft (P.O. Lo* 11991, 
CANADA. Meccano Ud. r IB7-189, Church Sireel. Toronto. 

PubKiM 

MECCANO LTD. (Depr. A.M.), BINNS ROAD, LIVERPOOL 13 




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